posts about or somewhat related to ‘Netflix’

If you use Netflix, you’ve probably wondered about the specific genres that it suggests to you. Some of them just seem so specific that it’s absurd. Emotional Fight-the-System Documentaries? Period Pieces About Royalty Based on Real Life? Foreign Satanic Stories from the 1980s?

If Netflix can show such tiny slices of cinema to any given user, and they have 40 million users, how vast did their set of “personalized genres” need to be to describe the entire Hollywood universe?

This idle wonder turned to rabid fascination when I realized that I could capture each and every microgenre that Netflix’s algorithm has ever created.

Through a combination of elbow grease and spam-level repetition, we discovered that Netflix possesses not several hundred genres, or even several thousand, but 76,897 unique ways to describe types of movies…

…What emerged from the work is this conclusion: Netflix has meticulously analyzed and tagged every movie and TV show imaginable. They possess a stockpile of data about Hollywood entertainment that is absolutely unprecedented. The genres that I scraped and that we caricature above are just the surface manifestation of this deeper database.

— Alexis C. Madrigal, The Atlantic. How Netflix Reverse Engineered Hollywood.

Netflix Uses Piracy Data to Select Its Programs
Netflix chooses its programming based on what shows and movies are popular on piracy sites, Netflix’s Vice President of Content Acquisition, Kelly Merryman, told Tweakers. Netflix looks at what people are downloading and then buys the rights to the titles in highest demand.
According to TorrentFreak, Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, suggests that offering people what they want will sway them to use Netflix instead of BitTorrent as their source of entertainment. The idea may not be far-fetched, since BitTorrent traffic in Canada dropped 50% after Netflix appeared three years ago. 
Via TorrentFreak:

“Netflix is so much easier than torrenting. You don’t have to deal with files, you don’t have to download them and move them around. You just click and watch,” Hastings says.

Image: BoingBoing

Netflix Uses Piracy Data to Select Its Programs

Netflix chooses its programming based on what shows and movies are popular on piracy sites, Netflix’s Vice President of Content Acquisition, Kelly Merryman, told Tweakers. Netflix looks at what people are downloading and then buys the rights to the titles in highest demand.

According to TorrentFreak, Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings, suggests that offering people what they want will sway them to use Netflix instead of BitTorrent as their source of entertainment. The idea may not be far-fetched, since BitTorrent traffic in Canada dropped 50% after Netflix appeared three years ago. 

Via TorrentFreak:

“Netflix is so much easier than torrenting. You don’t have to deal with files, you don’t have to download them and move them around. You just click and watch,” Hastings says.

Image: BoingBoing

CEO of Cablevision Sees a Future Without TV →

Via ABC News

Cable companies are increasingly facing demands for higher fees by TV programmers as it becomes harder to find new broadband customers. Meanwhile, consumers are increasingly turning to the Internet for programming. Last week, Cablevision reported total customers fell by 11,000 to 3.22 million in the second quarter.

On an average monthly basis, U.S. viewers spent an average of 8 hours 20 minutes watching video on the Internet in the first quarter of 2013, according to data from Nielsen, up from 5 hours 24 minutes watching video on the Internet in the same quarter last year.

And the saddest quote of the year award goes to:

Dolan, 58, said that his young children prefer to watch online video service Netflix using Cablevision broadband. 

Television is television, no matter what pipe brings it to the screen.

Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s chief content officer, as quoted in the New York Times last week. The company, which earned 14 Emmy nominations for its original content (including “Arrested Development,” “House of Cards,” “Orange is the New Black,” and “Hemlock Grove”), seems to have a firm grasp on what television will be like in the future. 

Reed Hastings, Netflix CEO, released a letter to the investors for Q2, and revealed:

Beyond series, we will be expanding our Originals initiative to include broadly appealing feature documentaries and stand-up comedy specials. Netflix has become a big destination for fans of these much loved and often under-distributed genres.

Disruptive Companies Infographic

Disruptive companies create innovations that invade the market, force change, and create new sectors of the industry. Here we examine a list of disruptive companies, and the industry effects of their innovation.

iPad, Google Apps, Skype, Zynga, Tata Nano, Netflix, Pandora
via Focus

Disruptive Companies Infographic

Disruptive companies create innovations that invade the market, force change, and create new sectors of the industry. Here we examine a list of disruptive companies, and the industry effects of their innovation.

iPad, Google Apps, Skype, Zynga, Tata Nano, Netflix, Pandora

via Focus

The reason that incumbents can’t react is that their revenue and defensibility are continued by serving the high-end of the market for which it would take too much time & money for any competitors to effectively challenge. In Netflix’s case this is their DVD distribution business. It’s hard to imagine somebody else being able to effectively compete with that.

But the real threat comes from the change in technologies that rule the old business obsolete. Streaming. It’s clear that in the future movies & TV will be delivered to our homes from the cloud. Indeed for many this is already the case.

To win the future he needs to attack his core assets by building new ones. Very few companies ever do this.

— Entrepreneur and investor Mark Suster on why he thinks Netflix CEO Reed Hastings should be applauded for his courage spinning off Qwikster from Netflix, even as the blogosphere seethes. 

(Source: bothsidesofthetable.com)

Does Comcast actually owe Netflix a share of broadband Internet subscription fees? Before dismissing the question out of hand, take a second to consider; in May it was reported that Netflix accounts for 25 percent of all North American Internet traffic. That’s a whopping number, and one that puts pirating of copyrighted material to shame, as a percentage of overall Internet usage. 
So do ISPs then owe some of there growth to Neflix? At the All Things D Conference, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings had this to say:

We haven’t yet said [to broadband providers], ‘Of your $40 [per month] broadband [service], we are 30% of the traffic, so we want 30% of the revenue,’” he said, according to a transcript by BTIG LLC. “We haven’t done that, [so] there is still a good relationship.”

That’s one side of the argument, and one that would likely resonate with the movie-streaming public. However, those in the know say that Hastings in bluffing, in the face of tighter restrictions on bandwidth, with net neutrality facing an uncertain future.
Michael Patcher, and analyst with Wedbush Securities had this to say:

"The Netflix service adds a layer of cost to broadband service, and it is inconceivable that a significant number of Netflix users sign up for broadband solely to access Netflix. That’s like Angry Birds creator Rovio asking Apple [Inc.] for a portion of iPhone revenues and asking AT&T [Inc.] for a portion of data-plan revenues … simply a silly concept."

If Angry Birds comprised 30 percent of traffic to the iTunes App Store, this line of argument might carry more weight. After all, Netflix put together the business model and content partnerships that drive the traffic over ISPs networks. Angry Birds, as an app, is one of more than 500,000—albeit a riotously popular one. 

Does Comcast actually owe Netflix a share of broadband Internet subscription fees? Before dismissing the question out of hand, take a second to consider; in May it was reported that Netflix accounts for 25 percent of all North American Internet traffic. That’s a whopping number, and one that puts pirating of copyrighted material to shame, as a percentage of overall Internet usage. 

So do ISPs then owe some of there growth to Neflix? At the All Things D Conference, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings had this to say:

We haven’t yet said [to broadband providers], ‘Of your $40 [per month] broadband [service], we are 30% of the traffic, so we want 30% of the revenue,’” he said, according to a transcript by BTIG LLC. “We haven’t done that, [so] there is still a good relationship.”

That’s one side of the argument, and one that would likely resonate with the movie-streaming public. However, those in the know say that Hastings in bluffing, in the face of tighter restrictions on bandwidth, with net neutrality facing an uncertain future.

Michael Patcher, and analyst with Wedbush Securities had this to say:

"The Netflix service adds a layer of cost to broadband service, and it is inconceivable that a significant number of Netflix users sign up for broadband solely to access Netflix. That’s like Angry Birds creator Rovio asking Apple [Inc.] for a portion of iPhone revenues and asking AT&T [Inc.] for a portion of data-plan revenues … simply a silly concept."

If Angry Birds comprised 30 percent of traffic to the iTunes App Store, this line of argument might carry more weight. After all, Netflix put together the business model and content partnerships that drive the traffic over ISPs networks. Angry Birds, as an app, is one of more than 500,000—albeit a riotously popular one. 

Netflix is now the nation’s leading bandwidth hog. And we can’t stop lovin’ em! 

Netflix is now the nation’s leading bandwidth hog. And we can’t stop lovin’ em!