Posts tagged with ‘Newsweek’

Today’s tween is no longer a child but not yet an adolescent; too old for Barbie dolls and Disney Junior, too young for Facebook and to understand the search results that pop up when she googles “sexy.” She is old enough to text, want designer jeans and use Instagram, but too young to have her own credit card and driver’s license. Still, she is a malleable thinker, consumer and marketing target. Each day, she is exposed to eight to 12 hours of media, depending on her age, that hones her understanding of how she is supposed to act. She spends a significant portion of her day plugged in – communicating, posting photos, playing games, surfing the web, watching videos and socializing. When TV, music, social media and the Internet are used as baby-sitters – when adults don’t ask girls questions or encourage them to think critically (and sometimes even when they do) – a dangerous scenario emerges: The media start to parent.

Abigail Jones, Sex and the Single TweenNewsweek.

An important and slightly horrifying long-read on pre-teen girls and media.

Related 01, and Horrifying: The YoutTube trend in which girls ask they internet if they are pretty or ugly.

Related 02, and Awesome: It’s Girls Being Girls, a YouTube Channel and Tumblr by Tessa, a senior at ASU, featuring and supporting cool, interesting, personal, inspiring content for girls by girls. Get in touch with her if you want to contribute!

#BuhBye

#BuhBye

Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition targeted for a highly mobile, opinion-leading audience who want to learn about world events in a sophisticated context. Newsweek Global will be supported by paid subscription and will be available through e-readers for both tablet and the Web, with select content available on The Daily Beast.

Tina Brown & Baba Shetty on the Newsweek of the future. (via newsweek)

Will it work?

fjp-latinamerica:

Lorena Guillén: Historia, Memoria y Silencios

A simple but highly evocative and personal book, derived from a caché of family slides that she was able to rescue from oblivion. Via Newsweek’s Picture Department:

Channeling memory and emotion through images made by her grandfather in Argentina more than a generation earlier, Lorena Guillén Vaschetti’s book Historia, Memoria, y Silencios captures feelings of the textured caress and mood of loss, anticipation, and desire. The images all made with slide film were nearly thrown away by Lorena’s mother but in a fortuitous moment some work was saved. History, Memory, and Silence is a moving and creative compendium of emotions that powerfully distills the always evolving nature of history into the living and breathing present.

From her introduction to the project:

Memory is certainly capricious and organic, permanently building and rebuilding itself. How is it that the truth, once repeated over and over again, becomes somehow another truth? What is the relationship between memory and the past? What role could photography play in such relationship?

Background: Lorena was born in Argentina in 1974, and has lived most of her life in Buenos Aires, where she studied Anthropology and Architecture before commiting to photography. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and exhibits throughout Latin America, the United States and Europe.

Bonus: Here is another amazing set of photos shot by Lorena in Perú for the Blue Earth Alliance. The photo project documents Incan healing techniques that use the curative properties of native crops in the fertile Sacred Valley.

Images: Historia, Memoria y Silencios. Via Picture Dept.

FJP stamp of appreciation and approval.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

Meme 1, Newsweek 0
Tina Brown’s latest Newsweek cover does what a Tina Brown cover does best: combine provocative imagery with an inflammatory title that gets people talking about the magazine.
In this case, “MUSLIM RAGE” screams the headline with two intense men wailing in protest underneath.
The cover itself is meta, playing on the “Why do they hate us?” meme that runs through the American press. Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, captures the absurdity of the premise:

One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage…
…On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute report on Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:

"It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now."

That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right to protest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator.

So, Newsweek is playing the ahistorical questions running through traditional media channels and while doing so, asks readers to chime in on Twitter with their thoughts using the #MuslimRage hashtag.
And that’s when, the Internet being the Internet, things got fun and users wrestled back the narrative:
"Lost your kid Jihad at the airport. Can’t yell for him. #MuslimRage" — @LSal92.
"I’m having such a good hair day. No one even knows. #MuslimRage" — @LibertyLibya.
"So you’re telling me that in this entire sporting goods store you don’t have a single ski turban? #muslimrage" — @TomGara.
"Ramadan in Iceland when days are 23 hours long. #muslimrage" — @iron_emu.
Coincidently, Michael Wolff recently wrote about Tina Brown and the challenges she faces with Newsweek from his new column at USA Today:

The most famous magazine editor of her generation is engaged in a desperate and operatic struggle, which almost no one anywhere believes has any chance of success, to reinvent Newsweek as a sustainable business proposition. In this, she is arguably no different from anybody else with a venerable media brand, except that Newsweek is in more dire extremis and her notoriety personalizes the fight…
…The issue was starkly simple: Could a traditional brand be reinvented in what is called a “digital first” context — and soon migrate entirely to digital — and, even more challenging, could it be reinvented by a traditional editor?

This week’s answer to that question is a clumsy MUSLIM RAGE cover with two stand-ins representing a billion-plus people. It’s analog link bait, a purposeful troll.
Yet, in a digital world where people can talk back and wrestle premises away from brands and organizations, the audience is mocking it. — Michael.
Image: Muslim Rave, via @max_read.

Meme 1, Newsweek 0

Tina Brown’s latest Newsweek cover does what a Tina Brown cover does best: combine provocative imagery with an inflammatory title that gets people talking about the magazine.

In this case, “MUSLIM RAGE” screams the headline with two intense men wailing in protest underneath.

The cover itself is meta, playing on the “Why do they hate us?” meme that runs through the American press. Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, captures the absurdity of the premise:

One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage…

…On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute report on Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:

"It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now."

That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right to protest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator.

So, Newsweek is playing the ahistorical questions running through traditional media channels and while doing so, asks readers to chime in on Twitter with their thoughts using the #MuslimRage hashtag.

And that’s when, the Internet being the Internet, things got fun and users wrestled back the narrative:

  • "Lost your kid Jihad at the airport. Can’t yell for him. #MuslimRage" — @LSal92.
  • "I’m having such a good hair day. No one even knows. #MuslimRage" — @LibertyLibya.
  • "So you’re telling me that in this entire sporting goods store you don’t have a single ski turban? #muslimrage" — @TomGara.
  • "Ramadan in Iceland when days are 23 hours long. #muslimrage" — @iron_emu.

Coincidently, Michael Wolff recently wrote about Tina Brown and the challenges she faces with Newsweek from his new column at USA Today:

The most famous magazine editor of her generation is engaged in a desperate and operatic struggle, which almost no one anywhere believes has any chance of success, to reinvent Newsweek as a sustainable business proposition. In this, she is arguably no different from anybody else with a venerable media brand, except that Newsweek is in more dire extremis and her notoriety personalizes the fight…

…The issue was starkly simple: Could a traditional brand be reinvented in what is called a “digital first” context — and soon migrate entirely to digital — and, even more challenging, could it be reinvented by a traditional editor?

This week’s answer to that question is a clumsy MUSLIM RAGE cover with two stand-ins representing a billion-plus people. It’s analog link bait, a purposeful troll.

Yet, in a digital world where people can talk back and wrestle premises away from brands and organizations, the audience is mocking it. — Michael.

Image: Muslim Rave, via @max_read.

newsweek:

We’ve got some cool news from the Department of the Future: NewsBeast is super proud to be launching our first Daily Beast Election Ad Tracker!
We’ve partnered with the fine folks at Super PAC App to help track political ads that air over the next 80 days until November 6th. Through our dashboard, you can watch and rate the political ads, read articles about the issues, and learn about the (oftentimes shadowy) groups that are producing these ads.
The end result: you’ll be more informed about all the messages screaming at your brain throughout the entirety of the 2012 election season.
So check it out. Download Super Pac App to your iPhone. Then go play around with the dashboard on the site. The more you know, the more informed you’ll be on election day.

FJP: Neat, excited to play with this.

newsweek:

We’ve got some cool news from the Department of the Future: NewsBeast is super proud to be launching our first Daily Beast Election Ad Tracker!

We’ve partnered with the fine folks at Super PAC App to help track political ads that air over the next 80 days until November 6th. Through our dashboard, you can watch and rate the political ads, read articles about the issues, and learn about the (oftentimes shadowy) groups that are producing these ads.

The end result: you’ll be more informed about all the messages screaming at your brain throughout the entirety of the 2012 election season.

So check it out. Download Super Pac App to your iPhone. Then go play around with the dashboard on the site. The more you know, the more informed you’ll be on election day.

FJP: Neat, excited to play with this.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko
FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?
UPDATE, via Eater:
But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko

FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?

UPDATE, via Eater:

But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Journalism Ranks 8th on Newsweek's List of 13 Most Useless Majors →

How they did it:

This year we started with new research (PDF) from Georgetown University—which drew from two years of census data to determine the prospects for myriad majors—to narrow down our list to more than three dozen popular college majors. We also used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, equally weighing the following categories to determine current and future employment and earnings potential for our final ranking.

The final ranking stats for journalism:

Unemployment, recent grad: 7.7 percent
Unemployment, experienced grad: 6.0 percent
Earnings, recent grad: $32,000
Earnings, experienced grad: $58,000
Projected growth, 2010–2020: -6 percent
Related occupations: Reporter, correspondent, broadcast news analyst

newsweek:

The Liberian journalist Mae Azango has been living in fear since March 8, International Women’s Day, when a newspaper published an article she had written about the negative health implications of female genital cutting, which is practiced among a powerful secret women’s society in many of the country’s rural counties. 
Says Azango: The callers warned that “they will grab me and put me in the Sande bush and cut me. And for putting my mouth in this business, I will pay for it.”
But that’s not stopping Azango.
“I won’t back away. Let me tell you that: I won’t back away,” she told us by telephone from Monrovia. “I am not saying I will do it today or tomorrow, but eventually I will do a story on it. Because this thing needs a lot of public awareness.”
Our story. Her story. 
Read them and be aware.

newsweek:

The Liberian journalist Mae Azango has been living in fear since March 8, International Women’s Day, when a newspaper published an article she had written about the negative health implications of female genital cutting, which is practiced among a powerful secret women’s society in many of the country’s rural counties. 

Says Azango: The callers warned that “they will grab me and put me in the Sande bush and cut me. And for putting my mouth in this business, I will pay for it.”

But that’s not stopping Azango.

“I won’t back away. Let me tell you that: I won’t back away,” she told us by telephone from Monrovia. “I am not saying I will do it today or tomorrow, but eventually I will do a story on it. Because this thing needs a lot of public awareness.”

Our story. Her story

Read them and be aware.

Jon Stewart on this week’s Newsweek cover featuring Michele Bachmann

Newsweek featured Michele Bachmann in this week’s issue and put, how shall we say, a rather unflattering photo of her on its cover.

Her supporters, unsurprisingly, lashed out but even many of her opponents are calling foul with Terry O’Neill, president of National Organization for Women telling the Daily Caller that the cover’s blatantly sexist because a man would never receive such treatment.

Elsewhere, at Salon, Joan Walsh says the cover’s not sexist, writing:

[Newsweek editor Tina] Brown has nothing to apologize for. Newsweek picked a striking photo that distilled Bachmann to her newsworthy essence. It’s also simply true that Bachmann does something very interesting with her eyes when there’s a camera in her sights. Sometimes she’s looking at something off camera, as she did when she delivered the Tea Party rebuttal to the State of the Union, which makes her seem distracted and/or demented. Often she just keeps them open impossibly wide and unblinking, which led Chris Matthews to ask her memorably if she was hypnotized on Election Night 2010.

Slate’s Jack Schafer has a different take. He supports Brown’s decision to run the image, but chastises her for pretending to be innocent of stirring up the pot:

There is nothing remotely unfair about making a strong visual statement about a profile subject if that graphic treatment harmonizes with the copy… The transgression comes only when the editor pretends—as Brown has with the Bachmann and Diana covers—that she wasn’t playing let’s-goose-the-public with sensationalist images. Obvious lies, such as Brown’s about merely trying to convey “intensity” with the Bachmann portrait, end up conveying contempt for the reader. And that’s not a pretty picture.

For more, New York Times Caucus blog covers the back and forth over whether the cover’s sexist. 

But what thinks you: Is the cover fair game or sexist?


 
IAC’s Diller: Daily Beast/Newsweek Losses Are More Than Tolerable
“I look at Newsweek as a startup and we’re building a serious asset in new publishing,” Diller said “What I mean by that a completely new model of publishing in terms of being both an offline magazine and an online one. We’re the only people taking an original online product, The Beast, which has grown phenomenally, and fused it with an existing print publication. We now have 10 million uniques, which is quite strong.”

IAC’s Diller: Daily Beast/Newsweek Losses Are More Than Tolerable

“I look at Newsweek as a startup and we’re building a serious asset in new publishing,” Diller said “What I mean by that a completely new model of publishing in terms of being both an offline magazine and an online one. We’re the only people taking an original online product, The Beast, which has grown phenomenally, and fused it with an existing print publication. We now have 10 million uniques, which is quite strong.”

(via scribemedia)

The death of the newsweek.com URL marks the official end of what was once a fully staffed and hugely trafficked site in its own right.

According to this article in New York Magazine, on July 19th the Newsweek URL will no longer exist. instead, all users will be redirected to the Daily Beast, its sister site.

Are there distinguishable factors that led to the demise of Newsweek or is it just one of many publications to submit to the pressures of new media?

The "Diana at 50" issue is, on the one hand, a heck of an attention-getting stunt for the struggling weekly, and a chance at last to show off some of that vintage Tina Brown shamelessness that’s been so restrained since she took over as editor in March. On the other hand, when you’re a magazine with the word “news” in your name, devoting a cover story to an elaborate piece of fanfic doesn’t exactly spell “journalistic credibility.” Come with Newsweek, won’t you, on a journey to alterna-2011, a place where a princess emerged unscathed from a Paris tunnel in 1997, and Helen Mirren surely does not have an Academy Award. On the magazine’s cover, a Diana with dark lines on her face to signify the cruel passage of time is disastrously Photoshopped next to the newlywed Duchess of Cambridge, while inside, the magazine imagines her gamely clutching an iPhone – the better to tweet from.

Mary Elizabeth WIlliams, Salon, Newsweek digs up Princess Diana.

We’re partial to Vanity Fair’s Exhumed Royalty Watch: James II at 310.

Pencil Study Newsweek Cover

Designer Edel Rodriguez gives us a peak into how he created this week’s Newsweek cover. Shown here is a pencil study of Osama Bin Laden and then the final cover.

Via Edel:

The next morning, Monday, I woke up a little groggy to a message in my inbox titled “Newsweek / Urgent / portrait commission”, and wish I hadn’t stayed up so late the night before.  The magazine was going to publish a Special Issue on the historic event and they needed the portrait the next day.

I immediately started sketching Bin Laden, trying to come up with an idea that would capture the moment.  While drawing his face from the reference photos, I instinctively painted over his eyes, and this ended up being the sketch that made it to the cover.

Click through to see the rest of Edel’s sketches and his design process.