Posts tagged with ‘PEW’

One in every seven statehouse reporters today (or 14% of the total) is a college student.

— Statehouse reporters, who cover state government and public policy, are on the decline, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. Get the facts here.  (via pewresearch)

Evolution, or Lack Thereof
Via Pew Research Center, Public Views on Human Evolution.

Evolution, or Lack Thereof

Via Pew Research Center, Public Views on Human Evolution.

Study says Journalists are Getting Less Respect

via Poynter

27 percent of Americans say journalists contribute little or nothing to society’s well being, according to a study by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life.

The percentage of Americans who say journalists contribute a lot to society has shrunk since 2009. The trend is particularly notable among women, 29 percent of whom said journalists contribute a lot. In 2009, 46 percent of women held high opinions of journalists.

Images: Polls conducted by Pew Research Center

latimes:

Twitter is not the world: Or America, for that matter. In a new study from Pew Research, reactions to events on Twitter often are detached from society’s reactions as a whole. While Pew found that Twitter consensus moves back and forth from liberal to conservative, what really sticks out is just how much more negative Twitter discussions can be.

For both [presidential] candidates, negative comments exceeded positive comments by a wide margin throughout the fall campaign season. But from September through November, Romney was consistently the target of more negative reactions than was Obama.

And as always, it’s important to understand the limitations of Twitter’s reach.

The overall reach of Twitter is modest. In the Pew Research Center’s 2012 biennial news consumption survey, just 13% of adults said they ever use Twitter or read Twitter messages; only 3% said they regularly or sometimes tweet or retweet news or news headlines on Twitter.

Read Pew’s full study here (or follow them on Tumblr, which will hopefully be proven to be more positive than Twitter).
Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP

latimes:

Twitter is not the world: Or America, for that matter. In a new study from Pew Research, reactions to events on Twitter often are detached from society’s reactions as a whole. While Pew found that Twitter consensus moves back and forth from liberal to conservative, what really sticks out is just how much more negative Twitter discussions can be.

For both [presidential] candidates, negative comments exceeded positive comments by a wide margin throughout the fall campaign season. But from September through November, Romney was consistently the target of more negative reactions than was Obama.

And as always, it’s important to understand the limitations of Twitter’s reach.

The overall reach of Twitter is modest. In the Pew Research Center’s 2012 biennial news consumption survey, just 13% of adults said they ever use Twitter or read Twitter messages; only 3% said they regularly or sometimes tweet or retweet news or news headlines on Twitter.

Read Pew’s full study here (or follow them on Tumblr, which will hopefully be proven to be more positive than Twitter).

Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP

Small Town News
The Pew Research Center released a report today in partnership with the Knight Foundation that explores how US adults get local news by community type.
Fun facts from the report:

Urban residents: People who live in large cities rely on a wider combination of platforms for information than others and are more likely to get local news and information via a range of digital activities, including internet searches, Twitter, blogs and the websites of local TV stations and newspapers. Urbanites were also those least tied to their communities in terms of how long they lived in the community and how many people they know…
…Suburban residents: Those who live in suburban communities are more likely than others to rely on local radio as a platform (perhaps because of relatively longer commuting times); they are more interested than others in news and information about arts and cultural events; and they are particularly interested in local restaurants, traffic, and taxes. Like urbanites, they are heavy digital participators who comment and share the news…
…Small town residents: Along with rural residents, people who live in smaller towns are more likely to rely on traditional news platforms such as television and newspapers to get local news; newspapers are especially important to them for civic information. Small town Americans prefer the local newspaper for a long list of information—including local weather, crime, community events, schools, arts and culture, taxes, housing, zoning, local government and social services. Residents of smaller towns are also the most likely to worry about what would happen if the local newspaper no longer existed.
Rural residents: Those who live in rural communities generally are less interested in almost all local topics than those in other communities. The one exception is taxes. They are also more reliant on traditional platforms such as newspapers and TV for most of the topics we queried. And they are less likely than others to say it is easier now to keep up with local information.

Pew Research Center, How people get local news and information in different communities (PDF).

Small Town News

The Pew Research Center released a report today in partnership with the Knight Foundation that explores how US adults get local news by community type.

Fun facts from the report:

Urban residents: People who live in large cities rely on a wider combination of platforms for information than others and are more likely to get local news and information via a range of digital activities, including internet searches, Twitter, blogs and the websites of local TV stations and newspapers. Urbanites were also those least tied to their communities in terms of how long they lived in the community and how many people they know…

Suburban residents: Those who live in suburban communities are more likely than others to rely on local radio as a platform (perhaps because of relatively longer commuting times); they are more interested than others in news and information about arts and cultural events; and they are particularly interested in local restaurants, traffic, and taxes. Like urbanites, they are heavy digital participators who comment and share the news…

Small town residents: Along with rural residents, people who live in smaller towns are more likely to rely on traditional news platforms such as television and newspapers to get local news; newspapers are especially important to them for civic information. Small town Americans prefer the local newspaper for a long list of information—including local weather, crime, community events, schools, arts and culture, taxes, housing, zoning, local government and social services. Residents of smaller towns are also the most likely to worry about what would happen if the local newspaper no longer existed.

Rural residents: Those who live in rural communities generally are less interested in almost all local topics than those in other communities. The one exception is taxes. They are also more reliant on traditional platforms such as newspapers and TV for most of the topics we queried. And they are less likely than others to say it is easier now to keep up with local information.

Pew Research Center, How people get local news and information in different communities (PDF).

pewinternet:

Who owns smartphones? Have a look -

FJP: Props to that 11% of 65+ year olds.

pewinternet:

Who owns smartphones? Have a look -

FJP: Props to that 11% of 65+ year olds.

(via houstonpublicmedianews)

The Politics of Social Media
The Pew Research Center released a study yesterday exploring how people, politics and social media interrelate. Some key findings: 

36% of social networking site (SNS) users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in keeping up with political news.
26% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in recruiting people to get involved in political issues that matter to them.
25% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them for debating or discussing political issues with others.
25% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in finding other people who share their views about important political issues.

Those numbers aside, it’s been 100% fun keeping up with Twitter while listening to convention speeches. It’s like chocolate and peanut butter how well the two go hand in hand. — Michael
Image: Detail from Who Uses Social Networking Sites (PDF), via Pew Internet and American Life Project. 

The Politics of Social Media

The Pew Research Center released a study yesterday exploring how people, politics and social media interrelate. Some key findings

  • 36% of social networking site (SNS) users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in keeping up with political news.
  • 26% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in recruiting people to get involved in political issues that matter to them.
  • 25% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them for debating or discussing political issues with others.
  • 25% of SNS users say the sites are “very important” or “somewhat important” to them in finding other people who share their views about important political issues.

Those numbers aside, it’s been 100% fun keeping up with Twitter while listening to convention speeches. It’s like chocolate and peanut butter how well the two go hand in hand. — Michael

Image: Detail from Who Uses Social Networking Sites (PDF), via Pew Internet and American Life Project. 

News Coverage of Trayvon Martin Case Drops But Still Public’s Top Story
Via the Pew Research Center:

For the third straight week, the controversy over the shooting death of Trayvon Martin was the public’s top story, though coverage dropped considerably. A third of the public (33%) say they followed news about the death of the African American teenager in Florida more closely than any other news, about twice the percentage citing the economy (16%) or the 2012 elections (15%). News about the controversy made up 7% of coverage, down from 18% one week earlier, according to a separate analysis by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ).
African Americans continue to follow news about the controversy more closely than whites. About seven-in-ten blacks (72%) say they followed Trayvon Martin developments more closely than any other story, compared with 26% of whites. Looking at partisans, 45% of Democrats say this was their top story last week, three times the 15% of Republicans that say this. Among independents more than a third (36%) say this was their top story.

News Coverage of Trayvon Martin Case Drops But Still Public’s Top Story

Via the Pew Research Center:

For the third straight week, the controversy over the shooting death of Trayvon Martin was the public’s top story, though coverage dropped considerably. A third of the public (33%) say they followed news about the death of the African American teenager in Florida more closely than any other news, about twice the percentage citing the economy (16%) or the 2012 elections (15%). News about the controversy made up 7% of coverage, down from 18% one week earlier, according to a separate analysis by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ).

African Americans continue to follow news about the controversy more closely than whites. About seven-in-ten blacks (72%) say they followed Trayvon Martin developments more closely than any other story, compared with 26% of whites. Looking at partisans, 45% of Democrats say this was their top story last week, three times the 15% of Republicans that say this. Among independents more than a third (36%) say this was their top story.

The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism generated gasps when it reported that newspapers are losing $7 in print advertising for every $1 of digital revenue that they gain. But the situation is even worse. In fact, publishers since 2005 have lost $26.7 billion in print advertising revenues while gaining only $1.2 billion in new digital revenue. Thus, the true ratio of print loss to digital gain is 22 to 1, not the 7 to 1 reported by Pew in March.

Liberating Disruption in Journalism →

When the Pew Research Center released its 2012 State of the News Media report the other day, one of its findings was that tech companies — rather than news organizations — were benefitting most from online and mobile advertising.

We identified this as a new type of digital divide with news organizations becoming increasingly reliant on the Googles, Apples, Twitters and Facebooks of the world.

Writing at the Online Journalism Review, Robert Niles inverts the concern and believes that this economic and power shift liberates the journalists who actually report the news:

I’ve never believed that newspaper companies are the originators of journalism. To me, the true originators of journalism are reporters and sources. Newspapers were yesterday’s middlemen, bringing together reporters, an audience, and the advertisers who were willing to pay to reach the audience that journalists’ reports would attract. Sure, newspaper companies played a vital role, but calling them the originators of content is akin to giving credit to an talent agent for an actor’s performance.

Today, tech companies have disrupted these arrangements. As a journalist, I can use Google’s Blogger to create my own publication and Google’s AdSense will pay me for the advertising revenue that my work attracts. And let’s not forget those downloads from Amazon and Apple, either, which provide an even more direct route for today’s writers to earn income from an audience. I don’t need a job with a newspaper a make living as a journalist now. Tech companies have become the new middlemen, through which sources and writers can reach an audience and customers, instead of having to rely on newspaper and broadcast companies to make that match, as they did so often in the past.

In this view, Pew’s report is not a depiction of a news industry losing control of its revenue future to the tech industry. It is instead a map of how tech companies are disrupting publishing monopolies, creating new avenues for journalists to travel in their careers.

Some of these new avenues are yet uncharted. Others won’t lead to any reasonable income. Others still will turn out to offer immense profit. All my work writing over the past few years on OJR about entrepreneurial journalism has been to help you find the best new avenue for you. But just because newspaper companies are getting squeezed doesn’t mean that you have to lose your future in the journalism business.

While I wouldn’t recommend anyone quit their day job for potential AdSense riches, I think Niles’ overall point is important to remember. Yes, I’d like to see legacy organizations with their histories and infrastructure for supporting great journalism survive. But more important I want to see great journalism itself survive.

I’m not convinced that the two are necessarily related.

Robert Niles, OJR. Turn news industry disruptions to your advantage.

News Technology's Digital Divide →

While not what we traditionally think of when we think digital divides, the Pew Research Center’s 2012 State of the Media report notes a growing gap between news organizations and technology companies, with news organizations becoming increasingly reliant on them:

At the same time, a more fundamental challenge that we identified in this report last year has intensified — the extent to which technology intermediaries now control the future of news.

Two trends in the last year overlap and reinforce the sense that the gap between the news and technology industries is widening. First, the explosion of new mobile platforms and social media channels represents another layer of technology with which news organizations must keep pace.

Second, in the last year a small number of technology giants began rapidly moving to consolidate their power by becoming makers of “everything” in our digital lives. Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and a few others are maneuvering to make the hardware people use, the operating systems that run those devices, the browsers on which people navigate, the e-mail services on which they communicate, the social networks on which they share and the web platforms on which they shop and play. And all of this will provide these companies with detailed personal data about each consumer…

…A year ago, we wrote here: “The news industry, late to adapt and culturally more tied to content creation than engineering, finds itself more a follower than leader shaping its business.” In 2012, that phenomenon has grown.

Seventy-four Percent of Tea Party Republicans Believe the News is Biased
A new Pew Research Center report on how Americans get their political news shows 74% of Tea Party Republicans believe the media is biased.
In the report, Pew notes that “[a]mong news audiences, those who cite the Fox News Channel or the radio as their main source of campaign news are the most likely to say there is a great deal of bias in news coverage.”
By contrast, 30% of moderate to conservative Democrats believe the media is biased.
Other findings include:
Cable television is the primary political news source for Americans;
The number of people getting their news from online news sources has leveled off after explosive growth between 2002 and 2008;
News consumption from newspapers and local and network television stations is in steep decline;
About 20% of Americans get campaign information via Facebook;
Just 5% get campaign information via Twitter;
Only 20% of people under 30 say they are following the campaign closely.
The Pew Research Center is available here and can be read online or downloaded.

Seventy-four Percent of Tea Party Republicans Believe the News is Biased

A new Pew Research Center report on how Americans get their political news shows 74% of Tea Party Republicans believe the media is biased.

In the report, Pew notes that “[a]mong news audiences, those who cite the Fox News Channel or the radio as their main source of campaign news are the most likely to say there is a great deal of bias in news coverage.”

By contrast, 30% of moderate to conservative Democrats believe the media is biased.

Other findings include:

  • Cable television is the primary political news source for Americans;
  • The number of people getting their news from online news sources has leveled off after explosive growth between 2002 and 2008;
  • News consumption from newspapers and local and network television stations is in steep decline;
  • About 20% of Americans get campaign information via Facebook;
  • Just 5% get campaign information via Twitter;
  • Only 20% of people under 30 say they are following the campaign closely.

The Pew Research Center is available here and can be read online or downloaded.

Young People Following SOPA. Old(er) People, Not So Much →

Each week the Pew Research Center releases its News Interest Index examining the most followed stories in the US market. 

Last week’s top stories were the sunken Italian cruise ship and the 2012 US elections.

SOPA also happened last week and it comes in at a somewhat respectable fourth (just after economic news stories). But what’s interesting is how it registered across age groups.

While just seven percent of people overall say they followed the SOPA debate, 23 percent of those under 30 surveyed say they followed news about the anti-piracy bill. That 23 percent is higher for this age group than any other news story.

Currently SOPA is off the table as lawmakers tinker with it to make it more “amenable” for re-introduction. As a congressional aid tells ReadWriteWeb, “I think, like anything else, if there’s not strong constituent opposition, it makes it easier for us to move forward on issues like this.”

Something to consider as older demographics largely ignore SOPA and other legislation affecting copyright.

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism and The George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs collaborated on a report that examined 3,600 tweets from 13 news organizations for the week of Feb. 14-20. The analysis found that 93% of the tweets contained links to the organization’s own site. Only 6% of the tweets contained no link, only 1% linked to another news site and another 1% linked to non-news content.

Twitter Engagement by News Organizations “Rare” [STUDY]

(via shaneguiter)

FJP: In other words, news orgs are using Twitter as a glorified RSS feed.

(via shaneguiter)