Posts tagged with ‘PIPA’

When SOPA-PIPA blew up, it was a transformative event. There were eight million e-mails [to elected representatives] in two days. People were dropping their names as co-sponsors within minutes, not hours…

These bills are dead, they’re not coming back. And they shouldn’t… I think we’re better served by sitting down [with the tech sector and SOPA opponents] and seeing what we agree on.

Chris Dodd, CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America, during a talk at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club earlier this week. Dodd was a US Senator for 30 years before becoming the MPAA’s top lobbyist.

Ars Technica, MPAA chief admits: SOPA and PIPA “are dead, they’re not coming back.”

Just like I told a French journalist and to the lady at the Washington Post, pirates are thieves and they do steal. Yeah yeah, “when I steal your DVD, you have no DVD, but when I copy a file, you still have a file” – I get that BS. We all know that it’s BS too. However, SOPAs and PIPAs create tyranny. If given the choice between thieves and tyranny, I’d rather stay with the thieves.

Suren Ter, creator of YouHaveDownloaded.com to Privacy Online News.

You Have Downloaded indexes IP addresses that have been used to download torrent files. If you visit the site, it will display what files have been downloaded on your network. 

The site, says Ter, is a proof of concept to show visitors what the entertainment industry might see as it tracks downloads across peer-to-peer networks.

H/T: Slashdot.



Frederic Filloux says Piracy is a big part of the digital ecosystem, and its role is both revered and ridiculed:
 

In October 2003, Wired ran this interesting piece about a company specialized in tracking entertainment contents over the internet. BigChampagne, located in Beverly Hills, is for the digital era what Billboard magazine was in the analog world. Except that BigChampagne is essentially tracking illegal contents that circulates on the web. It does so with incredible precision by matching IP numbers and zip code, finding out what’s hot on peer-to-peer networks. In his Wired piece, Jeff Howe explains:
BigChampagne’s clients can pull up information about popularity and market share (what percentage of file-sharers have a given song). They can also drill down into specific markets - to see, for example, that 38.35 percent of file-sharers in Omaha, Nebraska, have a song from the new 50 Cent album.
No wonder some clients pay BigChampagne up to $40,000 a month for such data. They  use BigChampagne’s valuable intelligence to apply gentle pressure on local radio station to air the very tunes favored by downloaders. For a long time, illegal file-sharing has been a powerful market and promotional tool for the music industry.

Piracy is still a problem, especially for software giants like Microsoft. Filloux points out that in China, so rampant is the problem of digital piracy for the company, that Microsoft sales are the same there as in the Netherlands, a country with just 16 million people—many of whom must be paying full fare for computer programs.

Frederic Filloux says Piracy is a big part of the digital ecosystem, and its role is both revered and ridiculed:

 

In October 2003, Wired ran this interesting piece about a company specialized in tracking entertainment contents over the internet. BigChampagne, located in Beverly Hills, is for the digital era what Billboard magazine was in the analog world. Except that BigChampagne is essentially tracking illegal contents that circulates on the web. It does so with incredible precision by matching IP numbers and zip code, finding out what’s hot on peer-to-peer networks. In his Wired piece, Jeff Howe explains:

BigChampagne’s clients can pull up information about popularity and market share (what percentage of file-sharers have a given song). They can also drill down into specific markets - to see, for example, that 38.35 percent of file-sharers in Omaha, Nebraska, have a song from the new 50 Cent album.

No wonder some clients pay BigChampagne up to $40,000 a month for such data. They  use BigChampagne’s valuable intelligence to apply gentle pressure on local radio station to air the very tunes favored by downloaders. For a long time, illegal file-sharing has been a powerful market and promotional tool for the music industry.

Piracy is still a problem, especially for software giants like Microsoft. Filloux points out that in China, so rampant is the problem of digital piracy for the company, that Microsoft sales are the same there as in the Netherlands, a country with just 16 million people—many of whom must be paying full fare for computer programs.

Jon Stewart on SOPA

I had to find out about SOPA and with Wikipedia down I had to turn to a notoriously unreliable source… the news.

Rushing something with such potential for far-reaching consequences is something I cannot support and that’s why I will not only vote against moving the bill forward next week but also remove my cosponsorship of the bill. Given the legitimate vocal concerns, it is imperative that we take a step back to allow everyone to come together and find a reasonable solution.

— Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) in a statement this afternoon coming out in opposition to PIPA, a bill he formerly cosponsored.

Your Images on SOPA
Via Steve Jurvetson.

Your Images on SOPA

Via Steve Jurvetson.

SOPA and PIPA are prime examples of big companies trying to do everything they can to stop new competitors from innovating. They’re also examples of how lobbying in the United States has become one of the most effective ways of limiting this sort of competition.

— James Allworth and Maxwell Wessel, Harvard Business Review. The Real SOPA Battle: Innovators vs. Goliath.

5 Ways to Get Your Own Copy of Wikipedia →

thenextweb:

The apps don’t require you to be online to view the pages, and you’ll be able to reference Wikipedia no matter where you are, even when it goes dark on Wednesday.

FJP: The English language version of Wikipedia will be offline this Wednesday in protest of the SOPA/PIPA bills currently in the US Congress. So, if you can’t do without, check out these apps.

(via ianhillmedia)

SOPA Dead, PIPA Next? →

Via the Examiner:

In a surprise move today, Representative Eric Cantor(R-VA) announced that he will stop all action on SOPA, effectively killing the bill. This move was most likely due to several things. One of those things is that SOPA and PIPA met huge online protest against the bills. Another reason would be that the White House threatened to veto the bill if it had passed. However, it isn’t quite time yet to celebrate, as PIPA(the Senate’s version of SOPA) is still up for consideration.

A common refrain in Silicon Valley is that Congress should be smart enough to know how the Internet works. It may sound reasonable, but it isn’t. There are 535 people in Congress who are responsible for passing laws that relate to the environment, pharmaceuticals, transportation, infrastructure, foreign policy, social services — every topic under the sun.

Although it’s a top-of-mind issue for us, neither California Senator Dianne Feinstein nor Senator Barbara Boxer list PIPA (the Senate equivalent of SOPA) on their top issues pages. It’s unreasonable to expect that members of Congress, many of whom are career politicians, study our business. Some make gut reactions in the name of privacy or fear of “hacking.”…

…In an accident of geography, technology has to fight for advocacy in Congress with Hollywood because both are represented by senators from California. If you look at campaign contributions alone, Hollywood does a much better job at reaching out to Senators Feinstein and Boxer than the Internet industry does. According to OpenSecrets.org, Feinstein has received $168,000 from the TV/movie/music industry vs. $86,465 from the Internet industry in the 2012 campaign cycle. Boxer has received $898,568 from Hollywood vs. $431,489 from the Internet industry.

Both of California’s senators are listed as co-sponsors of PIPA.

The cynical thing to do is assume that members of Congress are acting purely in their own financial interests. That may be true for some, but just as many believe that they are doing the right thing. That’s because we suck at presenting our side.

Rocky Agrawal, VentureBeat. If SOPA passes, we’re as much to blame as Congress and Hollywood.

Agrawal argues that SOPA and PIPA opponents must do a better job at educating politicians and the media on these issues and their consequences.

Under SOPA, websites can be blacklisted and removed from the Internet if they appear to be infringing on intellectual property or distributing copyrighted works. This is especially troublesome for artists whose work depends on fair use law and resides at the intersection of art, mass media critique and appropriation.

If SOPA passes, the U.S. government would easily be able to remove art from the Internet by seeking a court order against either the artist or the hosting provider. Corporate lobbyists would decide what art could and could not be shown online.

Alicia Eler, ReadWriteWeb. How SOPA Would Kill Art & Creativity Online.

In related news:

Speaking of Piracy →

On Thursday the House Judiciary Committee will vote on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). Meanwhile the Protect IP Act is making its way through the Senate.

As the Center for Democracy and Technology writes, “If passed, these bills would cripple online innovation, chill online free expression, subvert the inner workings of Internet security, and compromise user privacy.”

At 1WebDesign, they’ve put together the following list of resources for background on SOPA and PIPA:

Don’t Censor the Net has resources for signing petitions and contacting representatives here.