Posts tagged Palestine

History of Israel/Palestine, Animation Edition

Nina Paley, copyleft advocate and creator of the ever lovely Sita Sings the Blues, takes on the history of Israel/Palestine in this animated short.

Starting with with the first human settlers of the region to the Egyptians, Assyrians and Romans who each controlled it throughout the millennia, she navigates her way down to current day Israelis and Palestinians while focusing on a a fairly simple theme: it’s a perpetual and ongoing battleground.

Confused who’s who? View Nina’s Viewer Guide to her cast of characters.

Run Time: ~3:30

In comparison with other areas on the globe, the West Bank and Gaza might seem to many to be “flooded” with media. This is true in a sense, but it also misses a point. Traditional media, including local outlets, tend to go to the most expected places, and film the familiar shots over and over again. Both Israelis and Palestinians are tired of hearing the same news, and media outlets are less inclined to send crews to film an “occupation.” This leaves a great deal of space for citizen journalists, and the West Bank contains many of them.

Our model of citizen journalism is based on working with the “regular” local population, rather than with activists, and many of the videos we publish are filmed from windows, balconies and roofs rather than by someone involved in the incidents. This, I think, gives the videos a special quality, and helps the Israeli audience see the reality from the eyes, or camera lenses, of ordinary Palestinians. It is also important in terms of access, and allows us to monitor and document incidents that occur daily in Palestinian streets and fields.
Yoav Gross, Video Department Director of the Israeli citizen journalism organization B’Tselem to Witness.org. Citizen Video for Journalists: How One Israeli Group Became a Trusted Source for News.
World Press Photo of the Year 2012 contest winners
newsflick:

Paul Hansen of Sweden, a photographer working for the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter, has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 with this picture of a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City taken on November 20, 2012. Jury member Mayu Mohanna said about the photo: The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.

Picture: REUTERS/Paul Hansen/Dagens Nyheter/World Press Photo

World Press Photo of the Year 2012 contest winners

newsflick:

Paul Hansen of Sweden, a photographer working for the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter, has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 with this picture of a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City taken on November 20, 2012. Jury member Mayu Mohanna said about the photo: The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.

Picture: REUTERS/Paul Hansen/Dagens Nyheter/World Press Photo

There is something grotesque and disturbing about two parties with a long history of conflict live-narrating the launching of bombs that kill civilians and destroy communities.

The Israeli military and Hamas are livetweeting their war, including images of killed and wounded children. This certainly raises some questions, including for the companies whose platforms they’re using.

(The linked articles notes that the Israeli army’s Twitter account was briefly suspended. However, this is based on a report in the Daily Dot that does not cite sources for its claim, so I would treat it with caution.)

The Washington Post has more, including on a Youtube video from the Israeli military that was briefly taken down but has been reinstated.

(via curiousontheroad)

FJP: Agreeing with the next sentence: “There is no empowerment or revolution here: just a dark, sinking feeling as we watch the bloodshed unfold in real time.”

And in the things they didn’t teach you in school department, to delete the content or suspend the accounts “is not a decision a couple of hundred engineers in North California want to be making.”

Jessica Roy, BetaBeat. Social Media Companies Have Absolutely No Idea How to Handle the Gaza Conflict.

Currently on the Israeli Defense Forces Twitter Feed

Live blogging its attack on Hamas.

Images: Screenshots from @IDFSpokesperson. Select to embiggen.

"Occupation, Not Culture, Is Holding Palestinians Back"

iradeh:

By Palestinian businessman Munib Masri

EARLIER this week, while Israel’s cheerleaders and Las Vegas casino moguls were parsing every syllable uttered by Mitt Romney in Jerusalem as fastidiously as the Olympic judges were scrutinizing every back flip in London, millions of Palestinians issued a giant collective yawn.

The most excellent (and accurate) first line to a New York Times article ever. Worth a read.

FJP: It is a pretty great first sentence.

Assange TV Launches with Interview of Hizballah Chief
Via Radio Free Europe:

The mystery first guest on the new television talk show hosted by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was Hizballah chief Hassan Nasrallah. 
Assange said it was Nasrallah’s first interview with Western media since 2006.
"I want to know: why is he called a freedom fighter by millions and at the same time a terrorist by millions of others?" Assange said.
"This is his first interview in the West since the 2006 Israel-Lebanon war. His party, Hizballah, is a member of the Lebanese government."
Nasrallah, who is considered a terrorist by Israel and the United States, spoke via computer link from Beirut in the interview.

The episode can be watched on the Russian-backed, English-language RT news channel.

Assange TV Launches with Interview of Hizballah Chief

Via Radio Free Europe:

The mystery first guest on the new television talk show hosted by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was Hizballah chief Hassan Nasrallah. 

Assange said it was Nasrallah’s first interview with Western media since 2006.

"I want to know: why is he called a freedom fighter by millions and at the same time a terrorist by millions of others?" Assange said.

"This is his first interview in the West since the 2006 Israel-Lebanon war. His party, Hizballah, is a member of the Lebanese government."

Nasrallah, who is considered a terrorist by Israel and the United States, spoke via computer link from Beirut in the interview.

The episode can be watched on the Russian-backed, English-language RT news channel.

Israel Warns Media On Gaza Flotilla

Say you cover the Middle East and want to get a first hand look at the Gaza-bound flotilla activists are scheduled to sail in the upcoming days. Israel suggests you shouldn’t go, or it might prevent you from entering the country for the next 10 years.

Via Al Jazeera

Israel has warned journalists that they could be banned from entering the country for 10 years if they travel aboard an aid flotilla scheduled to set sail for the Gaza Strip.

The Israeli government issued the warning on Sunday, saying the journalists could also have their equipment seized in addition to other sanctions.

The threat came as pro-Palestinian activists prepared to set sail for Gaza from Greece and elsewhere in an effort to break Israel’s blockade of the coastal territory.

Eleven ships - nine passenger boats and two cargo ships - carrying about 1,000 activists from 20 countries are said to be taking part in the second Freedom Flotilla.

Among the activists are many Israelis, including Amira Hass, a prominent journalist of the Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

Facebook Removes Palestinian Intifada Page

It’s no easy task being the social network for the world’s conflicts.

Via the New York Times:

After complaints by Israeli government officials and Jewish organizations in the United States, Facebook took down a page today by Palestinian supporters that called for violence against Jews and an uprising against Israel…

…The conflict over the page illustrates the challenges that Facebook and other social networks are now wrestling with as their platforms, once used primarily for sharing photos and swapping updates with friends, have become powerful communication and organizing tools by advocates, especially in countries with limits on freedom of expression. Facebook and other companies, trying to maintain a neutral position, have been relying on their existing terms of service to manage the conflicts that arise.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes claims calls for violence among the 340,000 members of the Page were both common and increasing.