Posts tagged with ‘Pew Internet Survey’

A new Pew Internet and American Life Project survey explores how people learn about their local communities.
Our friend the newspaper still leads the way. Most don’t recognize that though.
Via Pew:

On the surface, most people do not feel that their local newspaper is a key source that they rely on for local information. For instance, when asked, “If your local newspaper no longer existed, would that have a major impact, a minor impact, or no impact on your ability to keep up with information and news about your local community?” a large majority of Americans, 69%, believe the death of their local newspaper would have no impact (39%) or only a minor impact (30%) on their ability to get local information.
Younger adults, age 18-29, were especially unconcerned. Fully 75% say their ability to get local information would not be affected in a major way by the absence of their local paper. The same was true of heavier technology users: 74% of home broadband users say losing their paper would have no impact or only a minor impact on their ability to get local information.
Yet when asked about specific local topics and which sources they rely on for that information, it turns out that many adults are quite reliant on newspapers and their websites. Of the 16 specific local topics queried, newspapers ranked as the most, or tied as the most, relied upon source for 11 of the 16. 

Image: Via Six Revisions.

A new Pew Internet and American Life Project survey explores how people learn about their local communities.

Our friend the newspaper still leads the way. Most don’t recognize that though.

Via Pew:

On the surface, most people do not feel that their local newspaper is a key source that they rely on for local information. For instance, when asked, “If your local newspaper no longer existed, would that have a major impact, a minor impact, or no impact on your ability to keep up with information and news about your local community?” a large majority of Americans, 69%, believe the death of their local newspaper would have no impact (39%) or only a minor impact (30%) on their ability to get local information.

Younger adults, age 18-29, were especially unconcerned. Fully 75% say their ability to get local information would not be affected in a major way by the absence of their local paper. The same was true of heavier technology users: 74% of home broadband users say losing their paper would have no impact or only a minor impact on their ability to get local information.

Yet when asked about specific local topics and which sources they rely on for that information, it turns out that many adults are quite reliant on newspapers and their websites. Of the 16 specific local topics queried, newspapers ranked as the most, or tied as the most, relied upon source for 11 of the 16. 

Image: Via Six Revisions.

General Adult Use Gender Use Age Comparison

Via the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project:

Among internet users, social networking sites are most popular with women and young adults under age 30. Young adult women ages 18-29 are the power users of social networking; fully 89% of those who are online use the sites overall and 69% do so on an average day. As of May 2011, there are no significant differences in use of social networking sites based on race and ethnicity, household income, education level, or whether the internet user lives in an urban, suburban, or rural environment. 

Let us bow before our power users.

Select images to enlarge.

A Pew Internet report released last week says that 92 percent of US Internet users are on Facebook. It also has some interesting facts about MySpace, LinkedIn and Twitter.
Via SocialTimes:

LinkedIn has more users than Twitter, 18 percent and 13 percent, which I find surprising. However, Twitter users, like Facebook users, are more involved with their networking, tweeting. It’s really comparing apples to oranges because it appears to be two different types of users. Only 6 percent of LinkedIn users visit the social network daily, whereas Twitter users are routinely at the platform tweeting away.
LinkedIn users are the best educated — 37 percent have a bachelor’s degree and 38 percent a graduate degree, whereas 21 percent and 18 percent for Twitter and 20 percent and 15 percent for Facebook. So, I am definitely a LinkedIn users by far.
What about good old MySpace? It is seeing the end of the journey with 29 percent of those surveyed are users. Of those users, only 7 percent actually visit it every day. Pew reports “MySpace users are more likely to be open to opposing points of view.” Facebook users are friendlier and like to hang with like-minded folks. 

A Pew Internet report released last week says that 92 percent of US Internet users are on Facebook. It also has some interesting facts about MySpace, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Via SocialTimes:

LinkedIn has more users than Twitter, 18 percent and 13 percent, which I find surprising. However, Twitter users, like Facebook users, are more involved with their networking, tweeting. It’s really comparing apples to oranges because it appears to be two different types of users. Only 6 percent of LinkedIn users visit the social network daily, whereas Twitter users are routinely at the platform tweeting away.

LinkedIn users are the best educated — 37 percent have a bachelor’s degree and 38 percent a graduate degree, whereas 21 percent and 18 percent for Twitter and 20 percent and 15 percent for Facebook. So, I am definitely a LinkedIn users by far.

What about good old MySpace? It is seeing the end of the journey with 29 percent of those surveyed are users. Of those users, only 7 percent actually visit it every day. Pew reports “MySpace users are more likely to be open to opposing points of view.” Facebook users are friendlier and like to hang with like-minded folks. 

Half of all adults get local news or information on a cell phone or tablet computer.
Source: Pew Internet Survey.

Half of all adults get local news or information on a cell phone or tablet computer.

Source: Pew Internet Survey.

Stats: Who’s Paying for What Online?

There’s an old yarn about people’s unwillingness to pay for content online, but the latest data from The Pew Internet Survey show how this notion continues to unravel. A sliver under two-thirds of all Internet users (65 percent) are buying something online, with the average survey respondent spending $47 per month on online content.

  • 33% of internet users have paid for digital music online
  • 33% have paid for software
  • 21% have paid for apps for their cell phones or tablet computers
  • 19% have paid for digital games
  • 18% have paid for digital newspaper, magazine, or journal articles or reports
  • 16% have paid for videos, movies, or TV shows
  • 15% have paid for ringtones
  • 12% have paid for digital photos
  • 11% have paid for members-only premium content from a website that has other free material on it
  • 10% have paid for e-books
  • 7% have paid for podcasts
  • 5% have paid for tools or materials to use in video or computer games
  • 5% have paid for “cheats or codes” to help them in video games
  • 5% have paid to access particular websites such as online dating sites or services
  • 2% have paid for adult content

Of the 755 survey respondents, nearly one in five (18 percent) said that they had paid for journalistic or editorial content of some kind, which should be good news for newspaper publishers. However, as we’ve seen with iPad versions of magazines, enthusiasm has been tepid overall. 

Perhaps it’s time for legacy media outlets to begin diversifying their online content offerings, seeing themselves as portals or curators of premium content worth buying. Without reprising the role of filters and analysts of the important news of the day, top media brands could engage and broaden their audience through myriad premium content offerings that subsidize the unprofitable, but essential journalism that established their brands in the first place.  

(Source: gigaom.com)