Posts tagged Public Media

Public Radio Bracket Madness: Down to the Elite Eight
Who you got? All Things Considered v Radiolab; Fresh Air v Talk of the Nation; The Moth Radio Hour v Wait Wait; BBC Newshour v This American Life. 
Going to be tight. Voting’s here.
If I were a betting man, I’d go RadioLab v This American Life in the finals. And then… my head explodes. — Michael
Image: Public Radio Bracket Madness by Southern California Public Radio. Select to embiggen.

Public Radio Bracket Madness: Down to the Elite Eight

Who you got? All Things Considered v Radiolab; Fresh Air v Talk of the Nation; The Moth Radio Hour v Wait Wait; BBC Newshour v This American Life. 

Going to be tight. Voting’s here.

If I were a betting man, I’d go RadioLab v This American Life in the finals. And then… my head explodes. — Michael

Image: Public Radio Bracket Madness by Southern California Public Radio. Select to embiggen.

The FJP stands with Big Bird.

More public media Tumblrs!

npr:

We’ve gotten requests in the past for links to other public media Tumblrs. We’ve re-blogged some other people’s lists before.

Now we’ve finally built our own list of links to other public media Tumblrs you could follow.

Check it out!

FJP: Sesame Street!

The other day we noted that Republican proposed funding cuts would affect PBS much more drastically than NPR. Slate’s Mark Oppenheimer says there’s no need to worry, PBS should be put out to pasture anyway. While NPR’s noted for its continuing innovation, PBS, he argues, has barely evolved.

The other day we noted that Republican proposed funding cuts would affect PBS much more drastically than NPR. Slate’s Mark Oppenheimer says there’s no need to worry, PBS should be put out to pasture anyway. While NPR’s noted for its continuing innovation, PBS, he argues, has barely evolved.

What would public broadcasting do with $178 billion?

Via Salon:

Apparently Americans want to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting because they think 5% of the federal budget goes to NPR and PBS. That was the media guess in a CNN poll released Friday. If that were true, Talking Points Memo noted, that would mean the CPB would receive $178 billion a year from the government. (And that’s not even counting what they get from Archer Daniels Midland and viewers like you.)

BBC, the largest broadcaster in the world, takes in $7.5 billion in income a year. If Americans were right, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would have a bigger budget than every military on Earth besides our own. NPR would beat China in an arms race.

What would the Corporation for Public Broadcasting even do with that kind of money, besides continue to have a liberal bias and support the establishment of sharia law?

Personal favorite: "Frontline" would always be in IMAX 3D.

Don't Forget PBS

Via the New Republic:

Ever since the Republican budget proposed to cut federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, everyone has been worried about what the reductions would mean for NPR…

…[But] it’s likely that the damage done to PBS would be even worse. While NPR’s national organization takes less than 2 percent of its budget from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, PBS gets 16 percent. Add this to the fees PBS collects from local stations, which fund the national organization in a fashion similar to NPR, and the loss in funding could affect 48 percent of PBS’s budget.

House Republicans called an “emergency meeting” last week, suspending the usual procedures to rush an urgent piece of legislation to the floor…

… This particular emergency involved the lower end of the FM-radio dial. Republicans, in an urgent budget-cutting maneuver, were voting to cut off funding for National Public Radio. All $5 million of it — or one ten-thousandth of 1 percent of the federal budget.
Dana Milbank, Washington Post, The NPR ‘emergency’.
In February, NYU’s Rodney Benson & Matthew Powers published Public Media and Political Independence: Lessons for the Future of Journalism from Around the World (PDF). Above are public media per capita spending numbers from the study that compare 14 countries.
What you’re seeing is a high of $134 for Sweden Norway and a low of $4 for the United States.
In the introduction to the report, the two write:

In report after report, America’s public and noncommercial media sector has been held up as a core component to the future of hard-hitting, accountability journalism. All of the major reports released in 2009 and 2010 agreed that there is a vital role for public and noncommercial media to play, and that the federal government must work to strengthen and expand funding for it.1 Together, these reports sparked inquiries at both the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.
However, too often the moderate proposals for federal funding and public media run into a wave of protest and knee-jerk reactions against any and all government action. In fact, government has always and will always influence how our media system functions, from the early newspaper postal subsidies to handing out broadcast licenses and subsidizing broadband deployment. The question is not if government should be involved, but how, and that is a question that demands an in-depth conversation, not a shouting match.

And while the recent NPR flair-up had not occurred as of the report’s release, political pressure is nothing new when it comes to America’s public media.

And as the recent efforts by politicians to punish NPR for its firing of Juan Williams suggest, public media in America possess little autonomy from direct political pressure. How can public media be adequately funded and adequately protected from partisan political meddling? These decisions do not need to be made in a vacuum. The lessons of other democratic nations, many of whose public media systems have been around long before American public broadcasting, are instructive.

Two good articles exploring the report come from Miller-McCune and Nieman Labs. Journo geeks can download the report from FreePress.

In February, NYU’s Rodney Benson & Matthew Powers published Public Media and Political Independence: Lessons for the Future of Journalism from Around the World (PDF). Above are public media per capita spending numbers from the study that compare 14 countries.

What you’re seeing is a high of $134 for Sweden Norway and a low of $4 for the United States.

In the introduction to the report, the two write:

In report after report, America’s public and noncommercial media sector has been held up as a core component to the future of hard-hitting, accountability journalism. All of the major reports released in 2009 and 2010 agreed that there is a vital role for public and noncommercial media to play, and that the federal government must work to strengthen and expand funding for it.1 Together, these reports sparked inquiries at both the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.

However, too often the moderate proposals for federal funding and public media run into a wave of protest and knee-jerk reactions against any and all government action. In fact, government has always and will always influence how our media system functions, from the early newspaper postal subsidies to handing out broadcast licenses and subsidizing broadband deployment. The question is not if government should be involved, but how, and that is a question that demands an in-depth conversation, not a shouting match.

And while the recent NPR flair-up had not occurred as of the report’s release, political pressure is nothing new when it comes to America’s public media.

And as the recent efforts by politicians to punish NPR for its firing of Juan Williams suggest, public media in America possess little autonomy from direct political pressure. How can public media be adequately funded and adequately protected from partisan political meddling? These decisions do not need to be made in a vacuum. The lessons of other democratic nations, many of whose public media systems have been around long before American public broadcasting, are instructive.

Two good articles exploring the report come from Miller-McCune and Nieman Labs. Journo geeks can download the report from FreePress.

Rodney Benson and doctoral student Matthew Powers surveyed public media systems in 14 countries for a Free Press report that documents this. In every Western European democracy they examined, public broadcasting channels attract at least a third of the national TV audience. Public spending per capita on media in all 14 countries ranges from $30 to $134 a year. In the U.S., that figure is less than $4. It goes up to about $9 when individual and corporate donations are included.

In all 14 countries, public media offered higher quality coverage of public affairs, more critical coverage of government and a wider diversity of viewpoints than their commercial counterparts (a pattern that holds for NPR). And these foreign public media stations have the freedom to schedule news programming during prime time, a luxury not afforded to the American viewer who doesn’t get home from work in time to watch the nightly news — at 5:30.

As a result, studies show that the level of knowledge about public affairs in many of these countries is both higher than it is in the U.S. and more equitably spread across education, class, race, ethnicity and gender.
Emily Badger, Miller-McCune, Might Public Broadcasting Follow BBC Model?

Why the NYT Should Go NPR

FROM THE PAGE:

There’s a lot of harrumphing around the blogosphere about the New York Times' decision to again put up paywalls for digital access (the last attempt, TimesSelect, was shuttered in 2007). People are gaming out the angles: Have they chosen the right price points at as much as $20 a month? Why the different prices for the iPad app vs. website access vs. print subscriptions?

But the whole approach is wrong-headed. With its large, affluent, reasonably liberal and guilt-ridden audience, the Times would have more monetary success and more brand success with an NPR-like pay-what-you-will membership model with free events, tote bags, and other goodies thrown in…

The paper should build up [its] goodwill rather than make [readers and fans] feel bilked, or have to puzzle over the merits of various pricing models as though we were shopping for cable packages.

Coming to a State Near You
The Participatory Politics Foundation and the Sunlight Foundation launched OpenGovernment.org yesterday to track government data, state legislatures, voting information and media mentions on the state level. Currently, information is available for California, Texas, Wisconsin, Louisiana and Maryland with funding efforts in place to bring the project to all 50 states.
Alex Howard reports on O’Reilly Radar:

"We’re providing a concentrated activity stream that offers a more calibrated way of staying in touch with state government," said David Moore, executive director of the Participatory Politics Foundation. "We believe in the power of peer-to-peer communications, which means connecting with people online and empowering them to share information with one another."
The idea, said Moore, is simple in conception but difficult in execution: create a free, open source platform where “it’s as easy to follow your state senator as it is to follow your friends on Facebook.” 
To get to launch today, the team rewrote the code base for OpenCongress, including an improved Ruby wrapper for open government APIs. The code for the wrapper is available through GitHub. Official legislative information is integrated with Follow the Money, ratings, news and blog information.

Coming to a State Near You

The Participatory Politics Foundation and the Sunlight Foundation launched OpenGovernment.org yesterday to track government data, state legislatures, voting information and media mentions on the state level. Currently, information is available for California, Texas, Wisconsin, Louisiana and Maryland with funding efforts in place to bring the project to all 50 states.

Alex Howard reports on O’Reilly Radar:

"We’re providing a concentrated activity stream that offers a more calibrated way of staying in touch with state government," said David Moore, executive director of the Participatory Politics Foundation. "We believe in the power of peer-to-peer communications, which means connecting with people online and empowering them to share information with one another."

The idea, said Moore, is simple in conception but difficult in execution: create a free, open source platform where “it’s as easy to follow your state senator as it is to follow your friends on Facebook.”

To get to launch today, the team rewrote the code base for OpenCongress, including an improved Ruby wrapper for open government APIs. The code for the wrapper is available through GitHub. Official legislative information is integrated with Follow the Money, ratings, news and blog information.

This legislation would ultimately dictate the daily editorial schedules and news programs of nearly one thousand public radio stations across America.

LA Loses Its PBS Affiliate

Via LA Times:

Next week, in addition to being without an NFL franchise, Los Angeles will lose another hallmark asset that major cities typically claim — a flagship PBS affiliate. Why couldn’t the nation’s second-largest media market sustain a thriving PBS affiliate that operated a top national player? If New York, Boston and Washington, D.C., can do it, why couldn’t Los Angeles?

Hint: audience engagement and quality original content.