Posts tagged RIP

RIP
Molhem Barakat, 17-year-old photographer, killed while covering battle at Al-Kendi Hospital, Aleppo, Syria. Via Dita Sely.

RIP

Molhem Barakat, 17-year-old photographer, killed while covering battle at Al-Kendi Hospital, Aleppo, Syria. Via Dita Sely.

1918 - 2013
Images: Selected newspaper front pages from around the world, via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

1918 - 2013

Images: Selected newspaper front pages from around the world, via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

We knew what the people wanted: the same thing the Doors wanted. Freedom.

Ray Manzarek, legendary Doors co-founder and keyboardist, who passed away yesterday. RIP.

Rolling Stone:

Doors co-founder and keyboardist Ray Manzarek died today in Rosenheim, Germany, after a long battle with bile duct cancer. He was 74. 

I was deeply saddened to hear about the passing of my friend and bandmate Ray Manzarek today,” Doors guitarist Robby Krieger said in a statement.  “I’m just glad to have been able to have played Doors songs with him for the last decade. Ray was a huge part of my life and I will always miss him.” 

Manzarek grew up in Chicago, then moved to Los Angeles in 1962 to study film at UCLA. It was there he first met Doors singer Jim Morrison, though they didn’t talk about forming a band until they bumped into each other on a beach in Venice, California, in the summer of 1965 and Morrison told Manzarek that he had been working on some music. “And there it was!” Manzarek wrote in his 1998 biography, Light My Fire. “It dropped quite simply, quite innocently from his lips, but it changed our collective destinies.”

Read on.

RIP Roger Ebert

Video: Remaking My Voice, via TED.

Obit of the Day: Britain’s Photographer of the Stars

obitoftheday:

For forty years Cornel Lucas was the best known photographer of Hollywood’s greatest actors when they were in England. Lucas, who first became interested in photography while working in a film processing lab, honed his skills in the Royal Air Force’s experimental school of photography.

Following the war Lucas worked for British Film Studios and began taking portraits of film stars who were making movies in the U.K. In 1951 he had a life-changing encounter with the legendary Marlene Dietrich. Dietrich, who knew nearly as much about photography as Lucas, was a difficult client but the results of the session were so stunning (top left) that he was given his own studio at Pinewood Studios.

He became a freelancer in 1959 and would continue to take portraits into the 1980s. Lucas’ work was celebrated in international exhibitions and is found in the National Portrait Gallery (UK) and the National Museum of Photography (UK). His achievements were recognized when he received the first ever “BAFTA” (the British Oscar) for a photographer in 1998. The Royal Mail also issued a series of postage stamps featuring Lucas’ portraits and labeled “Photograph by Cornel Lucas” in 1985.

Cornel Lucas passed away at the age of 92.

Sources: The Daily Telegraph and The Cornel Lucas Collection

Images, all copyright of Cornel Lucas:

Marlene Dietrich, 1951, courtesy of Time Lightbox (click for a full slideshow of Lucas’ work)

Joan Collins, 1953, courtesy of La Petite Melancolie

Self-Portrait, 1957, with upside down image of Lucas’ first wife Belinda Lee, courtesy of T for Tout (a tumblr)

Katharine Hepburn, 1948, courtesy of Mutual Art

Susan and Linda Travers, 1961,  courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Susan was his second wife

I’ve always liked this portrait. — Michael

“I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer, born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace and propelled by compressible flow.” — Neil Armstrong (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012)
Image: The view from the Apollo 11 Command and Service Module shows the Earth rising above the Moon’s horizon on July 20th, 1969. NASA, via Boston.com.
H/T: Sarah Zhang

“I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer, born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace and propelled by compressible flow.” — Neil Armstrong (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012)

Image: The view from the Apollo 11 Command and Service Module shows the Earth rising above the Moon’s horizon on July 20th, 1969. NASA, via Boston.com.

H/T: Sarah Zhang

Horst Faas, War Photography

Earlier this month, Pulitzer prize winning conflict photographer Horst Faas passed away.

The German is best known for his Vietnam War photography with over a decade spent with the AP in Southeast Asia, and was responsible for publishing iconic work by his colleagues.

These include the “Napalm Girl" photograph by Nick Ut of then nine-year-old Phan Thi Kim Phuc running naked from a US bombing attack; and "Saigon Execution" by Eddie Adams of a prisoner being executed in the street by police chief Nguyen Ngoc Loan.

Faas’ first Pulitzer in 1965 came for his Vietnam War coverage. He won his second in 1972 for his conflict coverage in Bangladesh.

Faas died from complications due to an infection he contracted during a 2005 correspondents’ reunion in Hanoi that eventually paralyzed him from the waist down.

Images via Der Spiegel:

  • Top left: South Vietnamese troops and their US advisers wait for a Viet Cong attack. (1965)
  • Top right: South Vietnamese children stare at an American paratrooper holding an M79 grenade launcher. (1966>
  • Middle: Horst Faas
  • Bottom left: A South Vietnamese woman mourns over the remains of husband after he was found in a mass grave. (1969)
  • Bottom right: A man walks past the bodies of US and Vietnamese soldiers killed while fighting the Viet Cong at the Michelin rubber plantation (1965).

Select any to embiggen.

Bob Marley, February 6, 1945 - May 11, 1981

Video: War, from the 1979 Amandla Concert at Harvard University.

Christopher Hitchens, 1949 - 2011.

Via Vanity Fair:

Christopher Hitchens—the incomparable critic, masterful rhetorician, fiery wit, and fearless bon vivant—died today at the age of 62.

The death of the newsweek.com URL marks the official end of what was once a fully staffed and hugely trafficked site in its own right.

According to this article in New York Magazine, on July 19th the Newsweek URL will no longer exist. instead, all users will be redirected to the Daily Beast, its sister site.

Are there distinguishable factors that led to the demise of Newsweek or is it just one of many publications to submit to the pressures of new media?