posts about or somewhat related to ‘SENSEable City Lab,’

MIT’s SENSEable City Lab currently has an exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum.
Called LIVE Singapore!, the MIT group collects realtime data and visualizes it across different categories such as ship traffic (Singapore has the world’s busiest ports), traffic patterns and cell phone use.
As the Lab explains:

Instead of focusing on any one specific application or limited number and type of data stream, this project explores up solutions that can cater for a large number of streams of very different kind of data, emphasizing the possibility of creatively combining multiple streams in the subsequent design of applications on top of the platform.

Pictured above is a visualization of what the team calls Urban Heat Islands. That is, the rise and fall of temperatures throughout the city. As the group notes, “It is documented that temperatures in cities are several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside, but as temperature rises we use more air-conditioning, which in turn results in even higher temperatures.”
Best yet, the Lab is releasing an API for developers to create visualizations of their own.

MIT’s SENSEable City Lab currently has an exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum.

Called LIVE Singapore!, the MIT group collects realtime data and visualizes it across different categories such as ship traffic (Singapore has the world’s busiest ports), traffic patterns and cell phone use.

As the Lab explains:

Instead of focusing on any one specific application or limited number and type of data stream, this project explores up solutions that can cater for a large number of streams of very different kind of data, emphasizing the possibility of creatively combining multiple streams in the subsequent design of applications on top of the platform.

Pictured above is a visualization of what the team calls Urban Heat Islands. That is, the rise and fall of temperatures throughout the city. As the group notes, “It is documented that temperatures in cities are several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside, but as temperature rises we use more air-conditioning, which in turn results in even higher temperatures.”

Best yet, the Lab is releasing an API for developers to create visualizations of their own.