Posts tagged with ‘Shakespeare’

smithsonianmag:

The History of English in 10 Minutes

A compilation of ten videos on the history of the English language.

Video source

Ed note: Watch as one woman works to bring back the language of the Ohlone, a Northern California tribe.

(via smithsonianmag)

Just two weeks ago we were impressed with Jesse Anderson’s announcement that he’d written an application that mimicked a million monkeys typing and it had successfully written Shakespeare’s A Lover’s Complaint.

Now fast forward and Anderson claims his digital primates have successfully recreated all of Shakespeare’s works.

Via Anderson:

The monkeys accomplished their goal of recreating all 38 works of Shakespeare. The last work, The Taming Of The Shrew, was completed at 2 AM PST on October 6, 2011. This is the first time every work of Shakespeare has actually been randomly reproduced. Furthermore, this is the largest work ever randomly reproduced. It is one small step for a monkey, one giant leap for virtual primates everywhere. This page shows what day each work of Shakespeare was completed on.

A Million Monkeys Just Might Write Shakespeare →

Jesse Anderson created an application that mimics monkeys tapping away at keyboards. The result, as he writes, is Shakespeare:

Today (2011-09-23) at 2:30 PST the monkeys successfully randomly recreated A Lover’s Complaint. This is the first time a work of Shakespeare has actually been randomly reproduced.  Furthermore, this is the largest work ever randomly reproduced. It is one small step for a monkey, one giant leap for virtual primates everywhere.

Anderson’s non-technical explanation runs like so:

Instead of having real monkeys typing on keyboards, I have virtual, computerized monkeys that output random gibberish. This is supposed to mimic a monkey randomly mashing the keys on a keyboard. The computer program I wrote compares that monkey’s gibberish to every work of Shakespeare to see if it actually matches a small portion of what Shakespeare wrote. 

Click through for a more technical explanation, including his use of Hadoop and Amazon EC2.

H/T: Slashdot.