posts about or somewhat related to ‘Tim Hetherington’

Training War Reporters in the Bronx
Last Spring, Sebastien Junger founded Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) in honor of his friend and Restrepo co-director Tim Hetherington’s 2011 death while covering the Libyan revolution. 
With the increase of freelancers covering conflict areas, RISC creates three-day training programs to “equip freelance journalists in all media to treat life-threatening injuries on the battlefield.”
Wired profiles a recent training session that took place in at the Bronx Documentary Center:

The need for medical training among journalists is especially desperate now as news outlets are employing freelancers — many without insurance or institutional support – to deliver stories.
“The industry is closing down bureaus. Increasing we are relying on freelancers for photographs. Look at the images from Syria, almost all of those are by freelancers, many of whom are without medical training or medical kits. It’s a recipe for disaster,” says [Michael] Kamber, who has reported from over a dozen conflict zones during his career and even admits that he was unprepared in the past.
In recent years, the deaths of several photojournalists have reminded us of the extreme dangers faced by reporters in conflict zones. Getty photographer Chris Hondros died in the same mortar explosion as Hetherington; Anton Hammerle was killed by Gaddafi loyalists in April 2011; and Rémi Ochlik died in the bombing of Homs, Syria, in February of this year.

Image: Conflict Training for Reporters, by Katie Khouri, via Wired

Training War Reporters in the Bronx

Last Spring, Sebastien Junger founded Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) in honor of his friend and Restrepo co-director Tim Hetherington’s 2011 death while covering the Libyan revolution. 

With the increase of freelancers covering conflict areas, RISC creates three-day training programs to “equip freelance journalists in all media to treat life-threatening injuries on the battlefield.”

Wired profiles a recent training session that took place in at the Bronx Documentary Center:

The need for medical training among journalists is especially desperate now as news outlets are employing freelancers — many without insurance or institutional support – to deliver stories.

“The industry is closing down bureaus. Increasing we are relying on freelancers for photographs. Look at the images from Syria, almost all of those are by freelancers, many of whom are without medical training or medical kits. It’s a recipe for disaster,” says [Michael] Kamber, who has reported from over a dozen conflict zones during his career and even admits that he was unprepared in the past.

In recent years, the deaths of several photojournalists have reminded us of the extreme dangers faced by reporters in conflict zones. Getty photographer Chris Hondros died in the same mortar explosion as Hetherington; Anton Hammerle was killed by Gaddafi loyalists in April 2011; and Rémi Ochlik died in the bombing of Homs, Syria, in February of this year.

Image: Conflict Training for Reporters, by Katie Khouri, via Wired

Photojournalism: Tim Hetherington Grant Application Opens

World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch are now accepting applications for the second Tim Hetherington Grant.

Created to celebrate the legacy of photojournalist and filmmaker Tim Hetherington, the “annual grant, worth €20,000, will be awarded to a photographer to complete an existing project on a human rights theme. The judges will look for the qualities that defined Tim’s career when reviewing the applications: work that operates on multiple platforms and in a variety of formats; that crosses boundaries between breaking news and longer-term investigation; and that demonstrates a consistent moral commitment to the lives and stories of the photographic subjects.”

Last year, Stephen Ferry used the grant for Violentology: A Manual of the Colombian Conflict.

Applications are due November 15 and can be found here.

Years later, when I put together a book about those events in Liberia, I included a photograph of one of the people who had been killed outside of the beer factory. I thought it was an important picture but didn’t dwell on what it might mean for the mother of that boy to come across it printed in a book. My thoughts about this resurfaced recently as I put together a new book about a group of American soldiers I spent a lot of time with in Afghanistan. They reminded me a lot of the young Liberian rebel fighters, and yet, when I came to selecting a picture of one of their dead in the battlefield, I hesitated and wondered if printing a graphic image was appropriate. It was an image I had made of a young man shot in the head after the American lines had been overrun—not dissimilar from the one in Liberia. My hesitation troubled me. Was I sensitive this time because the soldier wasn’t a nameless African? Perhaps I had changed and realized that there should be limits on what is released into the public? I certainly wouldn’t have been in that questioning position if I’d never taken the photograph in the first place… but I did, and perhaps these things are worth thinking about and confronting after all.

Tim Hetherington, from a chapter in Photographs Not Taken, a new book of essays by more than 60 photographers about times when they couldn’t, or wouldn’t, take a picture. Hetherington died from wounds suffered while covering the Libyan civil war in 2011. Via Time Lightbox.

If you’re in New York City there’s a panel discussion with the book’s editor and a few of its contributors at PS1 Sunday April 22 from 2-4pm.

Tim Hetherington’s ‘Diary’

Via Dana Stevens on Slate:

If Tim Hetherington (who, at 40, had only just begun his career as a feature-length filmmaker after years spent working as a photojournalist in West Africa) could be said to have a directorial style, it lay in this sense of rawness and disorientation. He sought to document the experience of war and political unrest from the point of view of an individual, a vulnerable body struggling to make sense of chaos and violence—which makes the news of his death, that ultimate vulnerability, all the more sickeningly sad.

Hetherington’s highly subjective, almost poetic vision of the events he spent his life documenting is on plain view in his remarkable 2010 short film Diary. (View it in full here.) Diary isn’t, by any meaningful definition of the term, a documentary. It’s an impressionistic 20-minute collage of images and sounds, a sketchbook of Hetherington’s memories from a decade of war reporting. While watching it for the first time the day Hetherington died—watching it because he died—I felt a pang at the thought that, in addition to losing a brave journalist who also seems to have been a lovely man, we have lost what could have been a great filmmaking career.

Run Time: 19:08

NPR

Some NPR coverage of photojournalist Tim Hetherington who was killed in Libya yesterday:

New York TImes journalist CJ Chivers writes about what happened and how, and gives his personal reflections on his Tumblr:

ABC News has an interview with Sebastian Junger, Hetherington’s collaborator on the Afghanistan documentary Restrepo: