Posts tagged Video

Live video isn’t working for newspapers because they try to do TV (which has its own problems) & it’s not done well

via newsplexer:

In the past five years, the Times, the Journal, the Post, POLITICO and others have dedicated more resources to video than to any other new endeavor, and, to date, have lost money in every case, sources at those organizations said. Creating compelling television, it turned out, meant more than putting talking heads around a table. It required millions of dollars, new innovations, and, most important, experienced producers and compelling on-air talent.

Now, the hope for live digital television is all but dead, and the entire industry is on a “course correction.” The focus has shifted from live programming to brief video packages requiring minimal cost and production efforts. Even here, news organizations have struggled to turn video into a lucrative business, let alone a robust revenue generator. In 2013, the Times couldn’t even draw enough viewers to deliver on its advertisement deals.

FJP: Let’s bring lack of imagination into this equation.

Just as early radio emulated print, and early TV emulated radio, early Web-based video is emulating contemporary TV.

Think different.

When there are global events such as the recent Ukrainian uprising, hundreds of thousand tuned into Epreso TV. Same same when we watched Tahrir Square via Al Jazeera. 

This doesn’t happen often though so consider what the Web delivery system actually is: text, graphics, video, words, interaction. It’s not TV and shouldn’t try to be.

Your successful video is created within that context, and within that delivery mechanism. Think through your medium and program accordingly. — Michael

Shoot Footage, Playback on ipad, Scan ipad, Animate

ANIMAL:

To create the video for Gabriel Garzón-Montano’s “Everything Is Everything,” filmmakers Santiago Carrasquilla and Joe Hollier shot footage, played it back on an iPad, scanned the iPad screen, then animated those individually-scanned frames together. The resulting clip occupies a pleasing middle space between analog and digital, with warm, inviting shots interrupted by disarming glitches and splashes of color. The song, a laid-back, funky R&B cut — and not a Lauryn Hill cover — is pretty damned good as well.

Hip-Hop At Harvard

Ammunition Group:

When multi-platinum hiphop artist Nas was growing up in the housing projects in Queensbridge, New York, he probably wouldn’t have guessed Harvard would ask to create a hiphop fellowship in his name 30 years later. But it’s happening. So how do you design a home for hiphop at Harvard? We ventured to find out.

Look Up, Wave, Say Hello

Via Nature

Imagine using Google Earth or other online mapping tools to zoom in on high-resolution satellite images of the planet taken just hours or days ago. Navigating backwards and forwards in time, one could track changes in everything from crops, forests and wildlife movement to urban sprawl and natural disasters, all with unrivalled temporal precision.

San Francisco-based Planet Labs, founded in 2010 by three former NASA scientists, is scheduled to launch 28 of its ‘Doves’ on 8 January. Each toaster-sized device weighs about 5 kilograms and can take images at a resolution of 3–5 metres.This is the vision of two Californian start-up companies that are set to launch swarms of small imaging satellites, which, by virtue of their sheer numbers, will be able to revisit and photograph huge swathes of the planet as often as several times each day — a frequency much higher than that achieved by current Earth-observing satellites.

At Skybox Imaging in nearby Palo Alto, plans are afoot for a swarm of 24 satellites, each weighing about 100 kilograms, which will take images of 1 metre resolution or better. Skybox launched its first satellite on 21 November and plans to launch another this year, followed by the remainder between 2015 and 2017.

In a first — at least for civilian satellites — Skybox’s devices will also stream short segments of near-live high-resolution video footage of the planet. So, too, will UrtheCast, a start-up based in Vancouver, Canada, whose cameras will hitch a ride on the International Space Station (see ‘Earth goes under video surveillance’).

FJP: So, “statellite swarms” is now part of our working vocabulary.

Stills from Skybox can be viewed here. The level of detail is startling.

Looking Back at 2013 in Citizen Video

Via WITNESS:

Police brutality, torture, chemical weapons attacks. Through the lenses of bystanders, witnesses, and sometimes even perpetrators, we were transported to this year’s the darkest episodes of humanity, all with the ease of a click, and the speed of an upload…

…In 2013, the Human Rights Channel curated nearly 2300 videos from 100 countries. Collectively, they reveal not only what citizen journalists filmed this year, but how that video was seen and used. Never before have YouTube videos brought egregious abuse to such influential audiences. But as the importance of citizen video becomes clear, so too do the challenges it involves, including the need for verification and the potential of misuse.

Warning: Graphic Footage

Disclosure: WITNESS’ Human Rights Channel is a partnership between WITNESS – where I run digital – and Storyful. – Michael

2013: What Brought Us Together

Jean-Louis Nguyen is back with a year in review that “explores the moments, people and stories that ‘brought us together’ this year, from tragic to triumphant, challenging or inspiring.’”

Feeling nostalgic and want to look back at 2012. Jean-Louis created a similar tribute back then.

Happy holidays, cheers to what’s passed and to the upcoming new year.

You can find Jean-Louis on Google+Twitter or, of course, back at YouTube.

Visualizing Our Drone Future

Via Alex Cornell:

Our Drone Future explores the technology, capability, and purpose of drones, as their presence becomes an increasingly pervasive reality in the skies of tomorrow.

In the near future, cities use semi-autonomous drones for urban security. Human officers monitor drone feeds remotely, and data reports are displayed with a detailed HUD and communicated via a simulated human voice (designed to mitigate discomfort with sentient drone technology). While the drones operate independently, they are “guided” by the human monitors, who can suggest alternate mission plans and ask questions.

Specializing in predictive analysis, the security drones can retask themselves to investigate potential threats. As shown in this video, an urban security drone surveys San Francisco’s landmarks and encounters fierce civilian resistance.

Run Time: ~3:00.

If Only For a Second

Absolute must watch. 20 cancer patients participate in a unique makeover experience. Runtime~3:44. By the Mimi Foundation.

An Animated Video Survival Guide for Journalists

Related to our last post about the lack of support and training freelance journalists are often faced with, check this out: an animated video guide of survival tips and techniques while reporting in war zones or areas of conflict. 

CJR reports:

Released in August by the Lebanon-based SKeyes Center for Media and Cultural Freedom, the unconventional how-to manual seeks to fill a void in do-it-yourself correspondent preparation. “Young freelance journalists are going to the most dangerous places in the world without any kind of training,” says Ayman Mhanna, the executive director of the SKeyes Center. The organization is a subsidiary of the Samir Kassir Foundation, which works to defend freedom of expression in the Arab world in memory of a journalist assassinated in Beirut in 2005.

The guide includes 14 animated videos available in both Arabic and English, covering everything from physical safety to online security. It’s fantastic.

Video: Lesson #2 from the series: How to protect your sources’ identities?

Puppets Explain Basics of YouTube Copyright

Puppets, Glove and Boots, and copyright lawyer, Fred von Lohmann, star in YouTube’s Copyright Basics video. The video explains everything from filing a complaint to fair use — intercutting the important information with clips of singing puppet apes. 

For more details on the subject, you can check out YouTube’s Copyright Center.

It’s no accident Facebook made Instagram’s new videos exactly as long as a television commercial

Which, according to Quartz, is a strategic move:

FJP: Interesting take. 15 seconds does feel a bit long for the Instagram attention span. Here’s a Digiday round-up of reactions to Instagram video.

cheatsheet:

Maurice Sendak would have been 85 today. Watch this animated short with audio from a Newsweek interview in which he talks about his childhood. 

FJP: The latest in the series by PBS Digital Studios & Blank on Blank. We love it. See also: The Beastie Boys on Being Stupid and James Brown on Conviction, Respect and Reagan.

Bonus: Our interview with Blank on Blank’s founder.

Why It’s Time to Rethink Web Video Entirely
Producer Adam Westbrook recently built an essay called The Web Video Problem about how cinematic video content is wrong for the web, and that we can and ought to recreate the visual storytelling experience on the web entirely. Toward that end, he’s working on web publishing house (Hot Pursuit).
He writes:

In visual storytelling on the web we are still talking about images in deliberate sequence. We are juxtaposing these images, either over time (in a linear audio/visual way) or in space (like a web comic might).
If we accept this definition of visual storytelling (in the purest sense) then it doesn’t matter if it’s video, a web comic or even an animated GIF - or a combination of all these and more.
Combine this with the growing capabilities of the web browser, and the connectedness of the internet, and potentially we have the ability to tell dynamic, visual stories in a way that hasn’t been done before.
This excites me very much.

The essay is nicely built and designed with bold, scrolling visuals (using the curtain jquery plug-in, which yes, is very popular these days and can be downloaded here for your own building pleasure) so that you can choose to read the whole thing or just get the highlights. It’s worth checking out. 
Bonus: He provides some great resources on visual storytelling:

A good briefing on the principles of visual storytelling are featured in the second issue of Inside the Story Magazine, available here. If you don’t want to pay for the whole thing, this free articlecovers a lot of the same ground. Scott McCloud’s comic book on comic books is an essential read for visual storytellers. Craig Mod’s essay on Subcompact Publishing informed some of the ideas about thinking web-natively, as did this article by John Pavlus and this piece by Bryan Goldberg. Finally, Steven Benedict’sanalysis of Spielberg’s cinematic storytelling skills demonstrate what visual narrative can acheive, and let Steven Soderbergh tell you why this new thing shouldn’t become like the movie business.

Image: Screenshot from The Web Video Problem

Why It’s Time to Rethink Web Video Entirely

Producer Adam Westbrook recently built an essay called The Web Video Problem about how cinematic video content is wrong for the web, and that we can and ought to recreate the visual storytelling experience on the web entirely. Toward that end, he’s working on web publishing house (Hot Pursuit).

He writes:

In visual storytelling on the web we are still talking about images in deliberate sequence. We are juxtaposing these images, either over time (in a linear audio/visual way) or in space (like a web comic might).

If we accept this definition of visual storytelling (in the purest sense) then it doesn’t matter if it’s video, a web comic or even an animated GIF - or a combination of all these and more.

Combine this with the growing capabilities of the web browser, and the connectedness of the internet, and potentially we have the ability to tell dynamic, visual stories in a way that hasn’t been done before.

This excites me very much.

The essay is nicely built and designed with bold, scrolling visuals (using the curtain jquery plug-in, which yes, is very popular these days and can be downloaded here for your own building pleasure) so that you can choose to read the whole thing or just get the highlights. It’s worth checking out. 

Bonus: He provides some great resources on visual storytelling:

A good briefing on the principles of visual storytelling are featured in the second issue of Inside the Story Magazine, available here. If you don’t want to pay for the whole thing, this free articlecovers a lot of the same ground. Scott McCloud’s comic book on comic books is an essential read for visual storytellers. Craig Mod’s essay on Subcompact Publishing informed some of the ideas about thinking web-natively, as did this article by John Pavlus and this piece by Bryan Goldberg. Finally, Steven Benedict’sanalysis of Spielberg’s cinematic storytelling skills demonstrate what visual narrative can acheive, and let Steven Soderbergh tell you why this new thing shouldn’t become like the movie business.

Image: Screenshot from The Web Video Problem

Stabilize that Camera

Ever have problems with a shaky cam when you’re shooting in the field? We all do, but check this new camera stabilizer.

Via Gizmodo:

The product is called MōVI, created by Freefly, longtime maker of crazy camera-drone equipment and stabilizers. [Vincent] LaForet is presenting a short film and behind-the-scenes video to illustrate its abilities, which consists of a completely custom-made gimbal and 3-axis gyroscope that digitally stabilizes the camera (a Canon 1DC in this case). It looks to be very light and portable, a far cry from giant metal arms, vests, and weights that almost the entire camera support world is based on.

Via Vincent LaForet:

This device isn’t the end of the sticks, Steadicam, slider, dolly or jib to be sure… but it sure will make you think twice about using those tools on many of your shots when you find out how quickly this device allows you to execute a similar shot but in a fraction of the time.   It can literally take longer to explain a shot,  than it would to execute a perfect shot with the MōVI.

It’s way beyond our price range, coming in at $15,000 for the version currently in production with smaller model to be released for around $7,500, according to LaForet. Still, would be good for a day rental on an important shoot.

Or, hopefully, as Gizmodo suggests, the technology will trickle down to more affordable models and spinoffs in the nearish future.