Posts tagged with ‘Web’

Kevin Kelly: The Next 5,000 Days on the Web 

TED junkies are probably familiar with this presentation by Kevin Kelly in which he talks about how all our connected devices are creating a single global machine.

We post it as to note that Hongkiat has put together a great list of TED design talks. These range from Stefan Sagmeister’s “Happy Design” to Tim Berners Lee’s “The Next Web” to Denis Dutton’s “Darwinian Theory of Beauty” among others.

Definitely worthwhile to spend time with these.

Source.

fiftyyrsoftech asked: I suspect our blogs will share much in common.. Do you plan to post more on the history of technology and products?

Hi there, 

I think you might be referencing posts we tag with “Jurassic Technology”.

We don’t go out of our way to find it but are certainly happy when we come across old computers, visions of the future and assorted odds and ends that sort of somewhat demonstrate where we’ve come from.

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that the history of  modern computing is over 60 years old, the Internet is over 40 years old, the Web over 20.

Or that the first calculator dates back to 2400 BC.

It’s taking longer than expected but we’ll be launching a Web site soon.
Designers and developers welcome to join in.
(Select image to embiggen.)

It’s taking longer than expected but we’ll be launching a Web site soon.

Designers and developers welcome to join in.

(Select image to embiggen.)

Semantic Web Gets a Boost →

Via Technology Review:

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo have teamed up to encourage Web page operators to make the meaning of their pages understandable to search engines.

The move may finally encourage widespread use of technology that makes online information as comprehensible to computers as it is to humans. If the effort works, the result will be not only better search results, but also a wave of other intelligent apps and services able to understand online information almost as well as we do.

The three big Web companies launched the initiative, known as Schema.org, last week. It defines an interconnected vocabulary of terms that can be added to the HTML markup of a Web page to communicate the meaning of concepts on the page. A location referred to in text could be defined as a courthouse, which Schema.org understands as being a specific type of government building. People and events can also be defined, as can attributes like distance, mass, or duration. This data will allow search engines to better understand how useful a page may be for a given search query—for example, by making it clear that a page is about the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, not five-sided regular shapes.

The article goes on to note that Schema.org standards support microformats microdata* rather than RDFa which is supported and promoted by the international Web standards body W3C.

Still, if it can gain traction, it’s a big step forward for machine understanding of all this content we’re throwing at the Web which, in turn, means a whole new class of applications using such data might be in our near future.

*Hat tip to Aaron Bradley (@aaranged) on Twitter for pointing out that it’s microdata, not microformats, that Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are supporting.

The Pilates approach: How CNN is trouncing its competitors on the web


       Using numbers from multiple analytics firms, it has long been apparent that CNN beats not only its cable news competitors on the web, but nearly every other major news source, as well. According to comScore, CNN received an average of 8.5 million unique U.S. visitors a day for the first three months of this year, figures that dwarf MSNBC’s 7.4 million daily visitors and Fox’s 2.3 million. A comScore spokesman provided me with charts showing that CNN, with 75.9 million US visitors, is beaten only by Yahoo! News Network’s 88 million. In U.S. monthly uniques, CNN outperforms MSNBC.com (51 million), AOL News (40 million), Fox News (20 million), CBS News (16.4 million), and The New York Times (32.9 million).

The Pilates approach: How CNN is trouncing its competitors on the web

      Using numbers from multiple analytics firms, it has long been apparent that CNN beats not only its cable news competitors on the web, but nearly every other major news source, as well. According to comScore, CNN received an average of 8.5 million unique U.S. visitors a day for the first three months of this year, figures that dwarf MSNBC’s 7.4 million daily visitors and Fox’s 2.3 million. A comScore spokesman provided me with charts showing that CNN, with 75.9 million US visitors, is beaten only by Yahoo! News Network’s 88 million. In U.S. monthly uniques, CNN outperforms MSNBC.com (51 million), AOL News (40 million), Fox News (20 million), CBS News (16.4 million), and The New York Times (32.9 million).

Bob Sacha Makes Some Great Notes on the Difference Between Broadcast Video and Video for the Web →

What is the difference between broadcast video and video for the web?
Adam Westbrook helps explain it a bit by detailing five things to avoid in web video that have become cliche’s in broadcast video.

-Bob Sacha comments on Adam Westbrook’s article in a blog post.  Bob Sacha is an accomplished multimedia journalist who transformed from analog to digital with great success.

With apologies to Chris Anderson: the web is not dead. In fact the browser may be the single most powerful app on your smart phone, not to mention every other screen you own. And it’s still far and away the best way to acquire news audiences.

Vivian Schiller, Former NPR Chief, Speaking at the 12th International Symposium on Online Media (transcript).

Her reference to Wired Editor in Chief Chris Anderson is to a 2010 essay he wrote with Michael Wolff called The Web Is Dead. Long Live the Internet.

Choose your name carefully. Then read it when URL’d.
Via Boing Boing

Choose your name carefully. Then read it when URL’d.

Via Boing Boing

Via Craig Labovitz/Arbor Networks:

A graph of Libya traffic by application (TCP and UDP port groupings) over the month of February. The top graph shows only Web and the bottom the top five other applications. Beginning on Friday (February 18), Internet traffic suffered several multi-hour outages followed by a continuing 60-80% reduction in traffic impacting all Internet applications. All data comes from more than 100 ATLAS ISP participants.

Via Craig Labovitz/Arbor Networks:

A graph of Libya traffic by application (TCP and UDP port groupings) over the month of February. The top graph shows only Web and the bottom the top five other applications. Beginning on Friday (February 18), Internet traffic suffered several multi-hour outages followed by a continuing 60-80% reduction in traffic impacting all Internet applications. All data comes from more than 100 ATLAS ISP participants.

The New York Times begins publishing daily on the World Wide Web today, offering readers around the world immediate access to most of the daily newspaper’s contents.

The New York Times on the Web, as the electronic publication is known, contains most of the news and feature articles from the current day’s printed newspaper, classified advertising, reporting that does not appear in the newspaper, and interactive features including the newspaper’s crossword puzzle.

— Fifteen years ago the New York Times announced that they would begin publishing on the Web.

Clay [Shirky’s] prediction assumes that news consumption will continue its shift from traditional media to the traditional desktop web, where the hyperlink rules and news consumers bounce from hyperlinked page to hyperlinked page and from site to site to site. I think that assumption is wrong. In 2011, we’ll see open acknowledgement of what has long been understood about the traditional desktop web as a platform for consuming news content — it sucks.

The desktop web has been a revolutionary platform in terms of access to information, the democratization of publishing, and the socialization of media. But as a medium for consuming news content, from a user interface and user experience perspective, it’s problematic at best and downright awful at worst. News consumption has begun a major shift from the traditional desktop web to apps for touch tablets for a simple reason — the user experience and user interface are so much better, as the recent RJI survey of iPad users reflects. Consumers are choosing tablet apps over the traditional desktop web based on the quality of the user experience and the overall content “package.”

— Scott Karp, Nieman Journalism Lab

Across the web, slideshows have become a shortcut to better traffic numbers; a shortcut that sites are now going out of their way to take. And increasingly they’re published because of the medium, not the message. The Huffington Post’s eleven-page presentation, “Simona Halep Breast Reduction Surgery PHOTOS: Tennis Star Back in Action” is only Exhibit A. New York and its new entertainment site, Vulture.com, have also committed to the slideshow, running several every week.

As page views became a priority, web editors had to decide when slideshows morph from fun novelty to craven solicitation. When I visit sites like The Huffington Post, I start to think the line has been irretrievably crossed. A slideshow’s desperation is evident in its headline. “Photos” of something “spectacular,” “magnificent,” and “amazing.” A “Top 10” list that must be seen to be believed! The hyperbole is hung out there on a string, baiting us to click.

But maybe all this pandering is worth it. Every site is trying to figure out a sustainable business model, and even the most asinine galleries help to subsidize the serious, thoughtful, and wordy articles that don’t earn as much traffic. Perhaps we should stop thinking of slideshows as the scourge of online journalism. Instead, we should consider them its savior.

— Chadwick Matlin, Columbia Journalism Review.

(Source: cjr.org)