Posts tagged with ‘Wordpress’

Top Blogging Platforms, 2013
WordPress remains the most used platform among the world’s top 100 English-language blogs with sites such as Mashable, Techcrunch and Ars Technica using it, according to Pingdom.
The New York Times continues to embrace it too with blogs such as The Lede, Bits Blog, Paul Krugman’s blog, The Opinionator all on WordPress.
Read through to compare this year with last and see what some of your favorite sites are using for their CMS/blog platforms.

Top Blogging Platforms, 2013

WordPress remains the most used platform among the world’s top 100 English-language blogs with sites such as Mashable, Techcrunch and Ars Technica using it, according to Pingdom.

The New York Times continues to embrace it too with blogs such as The Lede, Bits Blog, Paul Krugman’s blog, The Opinionator all on WordPress.

Read through to compare this year with last and see what some of your favorite sites are using for their CMS/blog platforms.

Elvin Jones

WordPress 3.5 was released last week and like previous versions is named after a jazz artist, in this case Elvin Jones.

The drummer played with a who’s who of jazz innovators such as John Coltrane, Miles Davis, McCoy Tyner, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Sonny Rollins and Wayne Shorter among others, and generally revolutionized how the drums were played.

Jones died in 2004.

A 1998 interview with NPR’s Terry Gross is here.

From Editor to Curator: How to Generate Engaging Content

Jenny Rooney, editor of Forbes CMO Network, discusses her evolving role as an editor-curator in the digital age. She has previously covered interactive advertising for Advertising Age, marketing for Business 2.0, and been editor at Chief Executive magazine and Sales & Marketing Magazine. 

Great content, like a great product, is still the essential ingredient for audience-building. But how can we broaden the conversations around it when we have less control over who produces content? Here, Rooney explains her work at Forbes, which largely centers on finding and bringing novel, innovative, expert voices into the conversation and providing them with the publishing tools to engage an audience.

Bonus: She offers tips for recent grads interested in journalism.

WordPress Dominates Top 100 Blogs
Via Pingdom:

We just completed a study and found that WordPress is in use by 48% of the top 100 blogs in the world. This is an increase from the 32% we recorded three years ago.
Other developments since then include that custom blog publishing platforms are more common now, TypePad has all but disappeared from the top 100, Tumblr has made an entrance, and some companies really don’t want to spill the beans about what solutions they use.

Nice to see Tumblr is in the top 100.

WordPress Dominates Top 100 Blogs

Via Pingdom:

We just completed a study and found that WordPress is in use by 48% of the top 100 blogs in the world. This is an increase from the 32% we recorded three years ago.

Other developments since then include that custom blog publishing platforms are more common now, TypePad has all but disappeared from the top 100, Tumblr has made an entrance, and some companies really don’t want to spill the beans about what solutions they use.

Nice to see Tumblr is in the top 100.

New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress
Via Poynter:

More and more journalists use blogging platforms to write and edit stories, but those text editors are pretty basic: It’s not easy to see what changes others have made to a post. And two people can open the same post, overwriting one another’s edits.
The New York Times has solved those problems for online journalists by building a tool that will track changes in a browser-based text editor. The tool, called ICE (for Integrated Content Editor) was built so that it will work with a variety of text editors; the Times has already built plugins for WordPress and TinyMCE, a common text editor used in blogging platforms…
…A demo of the Times’ text editor shows how it works. Changes made by different users are marked with strikethroughs or highlights. A user can press a button to accept or reject a particular change or all of them. It looks a lot  like revision tracking in Microsoft Word.
ICE is more sophisticated than the “track revisions” function in WordPress, which shows the previous version of a story but doesn’t highlight the exact changes. And while WordPress shows those revisions on another screen, with ICE they appear in the text editing window, right where you add links and boldface text.

ICE Demo. Download ICE from GitHub.
Image: Screenshot from the ICE demo page showing highlighted updates. When a user mouses over yellow text, they see who inserted the changes.

New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress

Via Poynter:

More and more journalists use blogging platforms to write and edit stories, but those text editors are pretty basic: It’s not easy to see what changes others have made to a post. And two people can open the same post, overwriting one another’s edits.

The New York Times has solved those problems for online journalists by building a tool that will track changes in a browser-based text editor. The tool, called ICE (for Integrated Content Editor) was built so that it will work with a variety of text editors; the Times has already built plugins for WordPress and TinyMCE, a common text editor used in blogging platforms…

…A demo of the Times’ text editor shows how it works. Changes made by different users are marked with strikethroughs or highlights. A user can press a button to accept or reject a particular change or all of them. It looks a lot  like revision tracking in Microsoft Word.

ICE is more sophisticated than the “track revisions” function in WordPress, which shows the previous version of a story but doesn’t highlight the exact changes. And while WordPress shows those revisions on another screen, with ICE they appear in the text editing window, right where you add links and boldface text.

ICE Demo. Download ICE from GitHub.

Image: Screenshot from the ICE demo page showing highlighted updates. When a user mouses over yellow text, they see who inserted the changes.

Can a WordPress Plugin Fight Internet Censorship?
Greenhost, a Dutch Web hosting firm, has launched the RePress Project. This is a WordPress plugin that turns your site into a proxy server to connect to Web sites that have been censored/blocked for whatever reason.
Via the RePress Project:

More and more governments from east and west are trying to censor the Internet. For different reasons the governments of countries like Iran, the USA, Syria, The Netherlands and China seek ways to block websites of the web and limit free speech. This plug-in will enable you to get those websites online again for you, your friends and the rest of the world without any hassle. Your website will become a proxy for the blocked website, rerouting any traffic from a user, through your website to the blocked site.
We believe in an Open Web and gladly make it possible for everyone to defend their human right to the free flow of information. By installing this plug-in you are doing your part to keep the Web Open.

Puzzled as to how proxy servers work? Wikipedia has a great overview.

Can a WordPress Plugin Fight Internet Censorship?

Greenhost, a Dutch Web hosting firm, has launched the RePress Project. This is a WordPress plugin that turns your site into a proxy server to connect to Web sites that have been censored/blocked for whatever reason.

Via the RePress Project:

More and more governments from east and west are trying to censor the Internet. For different reasons the governments of countries like Iran, the USA, Syria, The Netherlands and China seek ways to block websites of the web and limit free speech. This plug-in will enable you to get those websites online again for you, your friends and the rest of the world without any hassle. Your website will become a proxy for the blocked website, rerouting any traffic from a user, through your website to the blocked site.

We believe in an Open Web and gladly make it possible for everyone to defend their human right to the free flow of information. By installing this plug-in you are doing your part to keep the Web Open.

Puzzled as to how proxy servers work? Wikipedia has a great overview.

WordPress 3.3 is released.

Called Sonny (after jazz legend Sonny Stitt), the update addresses a number of usability issues.

It also includes a Tumblr importer… not that anyone wants to leave the cozy confines of here to head over there but it’s a nice option to have.

Note that this update is for the self-hosted, open source WordPress, not WordPress.com.

The early mistake I made in WordPress development was trying to do it all myself, even though it was an Open Source project. In the WordPress community a consistent theme has been that the more people contribute their best work the better the end product is, and my primary job is just to get out of the way. It took me a while to learn that, but now it’s ingrained.

— Matt Mullenweg, Founder, WordPress. The future of WordPress: Q&A with founder Matt Mullenweg.

The Open Source Publishing Workflow →

Maine’s Bangor Daily News pimped out WordPress in order to create a single editorial workflow for online and print.

Via Mediabistro:

The Bangor Daily News announced this week that it completed its full transition to open source blogging software, WordPress. And get this: The workflow integrates seamlessly with InDesign, meaning the paper now has one content management system for both its web and print operations. And if you’re auspicious enough, you can do it too — he’s open-sourced all the code!

The newspaper’s reporters and editors initially write their articles in Google Docs and when ready to publish send it over to WordPress in a single click. Once in WordPress, it’s just a matter of categorizing and adding some additional metadata.

They then leveraged WordPress’ APIs to create an InDesign plugin that sucks content out of the CMS and into that program.

Click through to watch a short screencast, and check out the plugins they’ve open sourced so you can play with it to.

Our iPad-optimized view is app-like in its functionality, but pure HTML5 goodness on the backend: it supports touch interactions, swiping, rotation, and many other features of the iPad.

— Nick Momrik, WordPress, Wow Your iPad Readers. • WordPress creator Automattic partnered with New York-based Onswipe to create a customizable iPad optimized view of all WordPress.com blogs. Have a self-hosted install? They released a plugin for you too.

John Battelle: I heard blogs are dead.

Matt Mullenweg: I heard that too, on a blog.

A conversation about blogs as the Independent Web, with some time spent on how Tumblr fits into the equation.

Mullenweg is the founder and creator of WordPress, which between WordPress.com and WordPress.org is the most used blogging platform/Content Management System on the Web.

Batelle is the founder of Federated Media, an advertising network focussed on providing solutions to independent media.

Run Time: 18 minutes with 12 minutes of Q&A.

WordPress Suffers Denial of Service Attack

  • Sara Rosso: The size of the attack is multiple Gigabits per second and tens of millions of packets per second
  • Matt Mullenweg: We suspect it may have been politically motivated against one of our non-English blogs but we're still investigating and have no definitive evidence yet.
  • US: WordPress.com was targeted by a distributed denial of service attack yesterday that affected millions of sites, including those if VIP clients such as TechCrunch, National Post and others. Do events like these give publishers pause when deciding to move their sites to a hosting/service provider like WordPress, where random attacks against others can bring down their own publications?

WordPress Gets more Tumblry

WordPress 3.1 was released Tuesday with this note from its founder Matt Mullenweg.

There’s a bucket of candy for developers as well, including our new Post Formats support which makes it easy for themes to create portable tumblelogs with different styling for different types of posts, new CMS capabilities like archive pages for custom content types, a new Network Admin, an overhaul of the import and export system, and the ability to perform advanced taxonomy and custom fields queries.

With the 3.1 release, WordPress is more of a CMS than ever before. The only limit to what you can build is your imagination.

We like WordPress. We like it a whole lot. And so too do others throughout the online world. It’s pretty much the most popular blogging engine around and is used by news organizations like Reuters, Time, the New York Times, CNN, Le Monde, Fortune and the BBC.

We also like Tumblr and take WordPress’ imitation of Tumblry features as their sincerest form of flattery yet.

shortformblog asked: As a brief follow on your last response, I'd like to note that a lot of our posts are put onto Tumblr using a heavily-modified version of the Tumblrize plugin.

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/tumblrize/

The reason why I do this is that the community here is a lot better and it's a better fit for the content, but I need a tad more than your standard Tumblr setup, since much of my stuff is built using different forms of CSS.

In a lot of ways, it's the best of both worlds, but we're honestly looking for a solution to the "more complex posting needs" problem that you eventually run into with Tumblr, because we'd like to do this full time.

Have taken a look at your WP site and am impressed and the WordPress Tumblrize plugin is a good one.

We’ve played with it a bit and found that it works best when we set our WP post to Tumble as a text post. Otherwise, we find it a bit of a crap shoot if we try to post as a Photo, Video, etc., especially since we use a lot of Custom Fields.

End WP nerdery.

Other than that, as I wrote in the Tumblr v WordPress post, I absolutely agree with you on the best of both worlds idea. If you have the bandwidth, it shouldn’t be an either/or proposition but instead both/and.

Thanks for the feedback.