Posts tagged adventure

Lessons from Alice

[T]ied round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words “DRINK ME” beautifully printed on it in large letters.
It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison or not;” for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is most certain to disagree with you sooner or later.
However, This bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off.

Alice ventured to taste it and found it very nice.
Image: Alice in Wonderland from Read.gov, which is putting classic books online.

Lessons from Alice

[T]ied round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words “DRINK ME” beautifully printed on it in large letters.

It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison or not;” for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is most certain to disagree with you sooner or later.

However, This bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off.

Alice ventured to taste it and found it very nice.

Image: Alice in Wonderland from Read.gov, which is putting classic books online.

Scaling Mt. Everest
Twenty-five-year-old Raha Moharrak is the first Saudi Arabian woman, and youngest Arab ever, to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. She accomplished the feat with the first Qatari and Palestinian men to ever reach the peak, and an Iranian man.
The group calls itself Arabs with Altitude and the expedition was made in an attempt to raise $1 million for education projects in Nepal.
Image: Raha Moharrak on being “first”. Mt. Everest aerial view via Wikimedia Commons. Select to embiggen.

Scaling Mt. Everest

Twenty-five-year-old Raha Moharrak is the first Saudi Arabian woman, and youngest Arab ever, to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. She accomplished the feat with the first Qatari and Palestinian men to ever reach the peak, and an Iranian man.

The group calls itself Arabs with Altitude and the expedition was made in an attempt to raise $1 million for education projects in Nepal.

Image: Raha Moharrak on being “first”. Mt. Everest aerial view via Wikimedia Commons. Select to embiggen.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas
National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.
But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.
Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.
Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas

National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.

But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.

Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.

Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.