Posts tagged advertising

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen
From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar. 
Via Charles Apple.

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen

From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar

Via Charles Apple.

How to Morph Forrest Gump into Daft Punk

When ad agency Grey London and design studio Us (Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor) came together, they created this stunning ad for The Sunday Times. In total, there are six iconic scenes from art, music, and film, fit into one single steadicam shot.  

From the creators:

This is all about those iconic cultural images that we pin to our walls and stick in our minds. We all have our favourites. Heisenberg, Kraftwerk, and Banksy’s kissing coppers all featured in early scripts, but we wanted to take a snapshot of what’s making the headlines in 2014. Daft Punk winning big at the Grammy’s, The final series of Mad Men, and Tarantino are all over the media right now. These people and their work have left an indelible mark and we’ll probably still be talking about them in ten, twenty maybe even a hundred years years time. The TV spot is a respectful nod to it all.

If you’ve ever seen a steadicam in action, you know how difficult getting everything perfect in one take truly is. If not, see the making of Icons here

Jay Z’s Most Name-Dropped Products, By Album
Via Vanity Fair. Select to embiggen.

Jay Z’s Most Name-Dropped Products, By Album

Via Vanity Fair. Select to embiggen.

Google on Friday announced that it would soon be able to show users’ names, photos, ratings and comments in ads across the Web, endorsing marketers’ products.

New York Times, Google to Sell Users’ Endorsements, via thefutureofnews

"Facebook has been aggressively marketing social endorsements, which it calls sponsored stories. For example, if you post that you love McDonald’s new Mighty Wings on the chain’s Facebook page, McDonald’s could pay Facebook to broadcast your kind words to all your friends."

"Twitter also enables advertisers to show public tweets in their ads, but requires advertisers to get the permission of the original author of a message before using it in an ad."

Nothing to see here. This is just the natural movement of companies finding ways to monetize the personal information you give them. If you don’t want to be in an ad, don’t endorse products online.

FJP: To opt out of Google’s “shared endorsements,” head here. Scroll to the bottom of the page and uncheck the box.

Related: Citing lack of use of its universal privacy controls, Facebook announced earlier this week that it was doing away with them and instead asks Users to select privacy settings on a post by post basis.

The caveat, of course, is that when Facebook says only a few percent of its Users use something, we’re talking millions of people. 

Facebook Bans Tourist Ad Due to Boobies Reference
Facebook refused to run an advertisement for Christmas Island, an Australian tourist destination known for its beautiful wildlife, because the ad referenced boobies — a kind of bird. 
According to Mashable, the advertisement was created for Christmas Island’s Bird ‘n’ Nature Week, and the ad meant to use “boobies” as a double entendre. The ad boasted of "some gorgeous shots" of some "juvenile boobies" — which were paired with images of boobies in nature (the bird kind). 
Facebook’s advertising guidelines were breached because the ad addressed ”age, gender, or sexual orientation of users on Facebook,” says Travel Daily News. 
FJP: Advertising 101: Juvenile boobies are always a touchy subject. — Krissy
Image: Mashable

Facebook Bans Tourist Ad Due to Boobies Reference

Facebook refused to run an advertisement for Christmas Island, an Australian tourist destination known for its beautiful wildlife, because the ad referenced boobies — a kind of bird. 

According to Mashable, the advertisement was created for Christmas Island’s Bird ‘n’ Nature Week, and the ad meant to use “boobies” as a double entendre. The ad boasted of "some gorgeous shots" of some "juvenile boobies" — which were paired with images of boobies in nature (the bird kind). 

Facebook’s advertising guidelines were breached because the ad addressed ”age, gender, or sexual orientation of users on Facebook,” says Travel Daily News. 

FJP: Advertising 101: Juvenile boobies are always a touchy subject. — Krissy

Image: Mashable

Popularity Comes When “B.O.” Goes

You learn a lot about a culture from its advertising. Take, for instance, this 1934 ad for Lifebuoy, a soap that “guards daintiness” as it protects women against unseemly odors.

Equally cringeworthy, it appears alongside “Hepburn Needed Those Spankings,” an article about Katharine Hepburn in Movie Classic, a studio-produced fan magazine.

It’s no accident Facebook made Instagram’s new videos exactly as long as a television commercial

Which, according to Quartz, is a strategic move:

FJP: Interesting take. 15 seconds does feel a bit long for the Instagram attention span. Here’s a Digiday round-up of reactions to Instagram video.

Banksy on Advertising
Via Upworthy. Select to embiggen.

Banksy on Advertising

Via Upworthy. Select to embiggen.

Likes Don’t Save Lives

UNICEF Sweden has a new ad campaign reminding people that while social media Likes are nice, what they really need is money to fund their vaccination campaigns.

As The Verge points out, “Facebook likes aren’t treated as currency in other commercial venues, so they shouldn’t be equated with charitable donations.”

And via The Atlantic:

In the beginning, organizations wanted you to like the heck out of their Facebook pages. Why? You know, community-building, awareness-raising, general “engagement”-upping…

…But one thing clicking “like” doesn’t do is, say, get malaria nets to African villages or boost funding for charity groups. And now that Facebook is nearly 9 years old and Twitter is 7, we’re seeing the inevitable backlash against social-media “slacktivism.”

Back to The Verge:

The campaign, created by ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors, takes a rather bold stance against the awareness campaigns that often spread across Facebook and other social media platforms. UNICEF officials acknowledge that such efforts can help introduce issues to a wider audience, though they fear that for most users, the action stops with the click of a button. To further stress this point, UNICEF Sweden released a bold poster alongside the video clips, saying that every like it receives on Facebook will result in exactly zero vaccinations.

That’s not to say “slacktivists” are a bad thing. Liking, sharing and reblogging do serve their purpose in bringing issues to a wider audience. But then what?

Last year, The Atlantic notes, Zeynep Tufekci, a sociology professor and a fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, had this to say:

What is called commonly called slacktivism is not at all about “slacking activists;” rather it is about non-activists taking symbolic action—often in spheres traditionally engaged only by activists or professionals (governments, NGOs, international institutions.). Since these so-called “slacktivists” were never activists to begin with, they are not in dereliction of their activist duties. On the contrary, they are acting, symbolically and in a small way, in a sphere that has traditionally been closed off to “the masses” in any meaningful fashion.

The goal then for those working in social media is to simultaneously help the “slacktivist” set help you by building out ambient awareness of an issue through the messaging you create, while also giving activists and more consistently loyal proponents direct calls to action be it donations, volunteerism, network building, etc.

Meantime, if you’re moved to Like a cause, consider volunteering your time and/or other resources to it as well.

The other two commercials in UNICEF’s campaign can be viewed at The Verge. — Michael

World Press Freedom Day, Redux

Additional imagery from Reporters Without Borders to go along with our earlier post.

Select to embiggen.

A trade group says that newspapers like the New York Times have seen large increases in circulation, but that’s partly because they are allowed to count their readers multiple times. The industry needs to do better.

Via paidContent:

The latest circulation gains for the NYT and others came courtesy of the Alliance for Audited Media (formerly known as the Audit Bureau of Circulations), an industry group composed of advertising agencies and publishers. The group noted that the numbers are not really comparable to the previous year’s results for a number of reasons, including the fact that some newspapers have launched new subscription formats, stopped printing every day and so on.

As Edmund Lee at Bloomberg points out, the AAM survey — which is somewhat ironically locked behind a paywall — also allows publishers to count their readers multiple times, according to rules adopted recently by the group. In other words, newspapers can count someone who reads the newspaper in print, on the web and on their Kindle as three separate readers. But doesn’t this inflate their readership numbers unreasonably? It sure does. The bottom line is that no one really knows what the “real” readership numbers are for newspapers.

Some argue this has always been the case with newspapers, which is true: publishers have routinely engaged in all kinds of shady tricks to boost their circulation — including special discounts for bulk purchases by hotels and airlines and other giveaways, and even dumping large quantities into ravines or pulping them after printing. On top of that, many papers have inflated their readership numbers for years by claiming that each copy gets read by as many as five people, an estimate that borders on the ridiculous.

Old Timey Computer Ads

Behold the computer in a briefcase, the $3,398 10MB hard disk and the 16k of RAM that turns your computer into a working giant.

For more, visit io9, Hilarious and Awesome Computer Ads from the Golden Age of PCs.

Newspaper Advertising
bostonreview:

Why the Washington Post and other newspapers need pay walls. (Via The Atlantic)

FJP: Interesting to see since we we were just having a conversation about it.

Newspaper Advertising

bostonreview:

Why the Washington Post and other newspapers need pay walls. (Via The Atlantic)

FJP: Interesting to see since we we were just having a conversation about it.

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them
Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.
Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers…
…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.
Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them

Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.

Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers

…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.

Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).