Posts tagged advertising

If advertising is meant to be aspirational, these ads [in men’s magazines] are presenting a pretty sad version of what American men can aspire to be. And advertisers aren’t selling this hyper-masculine ideal to just any man: They’re specifically targeting the younger, poorer, less-educated guys in the supermarket aisle. In the latest issue of the journal Sex Roles, a trio of psychologists at the University of Manitoba analyzed the advertising images in a slate of magazines targeted at men, from Fortune to Field and Stream. They counted up the ads that depict men as violent, calloused, tough, dangerous, and sexually aggressive—what the researchers call “hyper-masculine”—then indexed them with the magazine’s target demographics. Hyper-masculine images, the researchers found, are more likely to be sold to adolescents, who find higher “peer group support” for manly-man behaviors. They’re also sold to working-class men, who are “embedded in enduring social and economic structures in which they experience powerlessness and lack of access to resources” like political power, social respect, and wealth, and so turn to more widely accessible measures of masculine worth—like “physical strength and aggression.”

So God Made a (Latino) Farmer

fjp-latinamerica:

One of the most popular ads during the Super Bowl was for the Dodge Ram. The spot took a 1978 speech by the late Paul Harvey and played it against images of American farmers.

Something was missing though. We let Latino Rebels take it away:

Do you notice anything about the farmers being featured in the commercial?

Yeah, 100% Americana. An America that seems to be stuck in another time. Last time we checked, the commercial overlooked a few other farmers, the over 3 million workers who contribute to the country’s $28+ billion fruit and vegetable industry. Or what about the fact that “the majority (72%) of all farmworkers were foreign-born, with 68 percent of all farmworkers were born in Mexico?” We are guessing that displaying the REAL FACE of farming in the United States would that have been way too uncomfortable to show? By the way, we know you showed only two Latino faces for a second, but that didn’t cut it, Chrysler. 

So, a remake is in order. Doing so above is the award winning investigative reporter Issac Cubillos

The Millennial’s Learning Dilemma

Digiday came out with an interesting compilation of perspectives on millennials (aka Gen Y, born in from the ’80s to the 2000’s) who comprise the new crop of working professionals in ad agencies.

The ad exec’s perspective seems largely to be that millennials feel excessively entitled, are at times over-payed and are inclined to having big ideas but no mastery of a craft. Example: an agency executive talking about a millennial he hired and then let go (via WTF Millennials: Managing Agencies’ Newest Generation:

He didn’t know how to do anything. He could talk about stuff and criticize what agencies were doing but really added no value. At one point, I walked by his desk and saw Facebook on one monitor and Tweetdeck on another. I told him that he’s so good at social media that he’s totally unproductive. We let him go a few days later. In his mind, he nailed the task and moved on to help get the ad industry back on track. Sigh. The overconfidence, zero accountability and zero remorse is 100 percent millennial. They don’t get the concept of learning.

The millennial’s perspective seems to be one which struggles to reconcile with one too many contentions: old-school divisions of labor, integrating digital and traditional advertising, and harder, bigger questions like how to maintain (idealistic?) values of openness, honesty and social good, while working in an industry that isn’t exactly reputed for these things. They’re left unable (and perhaps unwilling) to master a craft because of a lack of the bigger picture, and at times a lack of mentorship to get there.

FJP: I thought about using Tumblr’s chat-post format to excerpt these pieces as a conversation between millennials and ad execs, but in my mind, the perspectives don’t really speak to each other. Though I don’t work in advertising, the conversation touches on adjacent industries just the same. The problem seems to be that many of us (millennials) view “learning” as a very intentional (and arguably selfish) affair. I’m certainly victim to the big ideas and not enough craft dilemma but it’s because I want to master a craft if I’m driven to on a personal level, and that drive entirely comes from having a clear vision of the big picture—confidence that my efforts today won’t lead to another future in which social good is at the bottom of the priority list, and profit is at the top. This attitude won’t work well in the average entry-level position, but it’s often our only entry point. I’ve been lucky enough to receive an education and professional mentors who encourage me to go long with my big ideas, which in turn makes me want to be accountable. Not an easy environment to create but much gratitude to those who’ve done it. —Jihii

digg:

A Connecticut newspaper ran an ad for a gun show next to a story about Sandy Hook today.

FJP: In December we noted a gun ad on the Miami Herald’s home page. At least in that case you could chalk it up to an unfortunate case of contextual advertising algorithms doing their thing.
Here, not at all. Just plain mailing it in.

digg:

A Connecticut newspaper ran an ad for a gun show next to a story about Sandy Hook today.

FJP: In December we noted a gun ad on the Miami Herald’s home page. At least in that case you could chalk it up to an unfortunate case of contextual advertising algorithms doing their thing.

Here, not at all. Just plain mailing it in.

Miami Herald
The Problem With Contextual Advertising
Image: Screenshot, Miami Herald Home Page, December 16, 2012.

Miami Herald

The Problem With Contextual Advertising

Image: Screenshot, Miami Herald Home Page, December 16, 2012.

Moleskins and Stop Motion Are Just a Few of Our Favorite Things

Created by Rogier Wieland for Moleskin using 382 notebooks, his cat and a mouse borrowed from a pet shop.

The making of video can be viewed here.

H/T: Colossal

The Reliable Electronic Memory
Advertisement circa 1950 via BoingBoing.

The Reliable Electronic Memory

Advertisement circa 1950 via BoingBoing.

A Chair is Like Facebook, or Vice Versa

So too doorbells, airplanes, bridges, ideas, music, dance floors, basketball, a great nation and… the universe.

Facebook releases its first commercial. 

Bidding on Your Personal Browser History

Proclivity Media and others are working very hard to find out what you want to buy, and they’re getting to know you very well along the way.

Here’s the backstory: one particularly savvy way of advertising has begun receiving a lot of attention lately. It’s called re-targeting, and it relies on personal browser history to figure out what users may want to buy.

Automated programming bids on ad space individual users see based on their personal search history, more traditional consumer reports and retailer records, selling one-time ads at several hundred dollars a pop.

via Internet Retailer:

Proclivity uses its Consumer Valuation Platform to place cookies in consumers’ web browsers to monitor their browsing behavior around the Internet and tracks their specific interactions on a client retailer’s site using tiny pieces of embedded software code in site content. Proclivity adds data from the retailer, including the merchant’s own web analytics on shoppers’ click activity, and information on sales, merchandizing campaigns and product pricing, then scores it to determine when each customer is likely to buy and at what price point.

This is very similar to Facebook Exchange, which has been working cautiously well since June.

Here’s the Wall Street Journal:

Facebook is using its data trove to study the links between Facebook ads and members’ shopping habits at brick-and-mortar stores, part of an effort to prove the effectiveness of its $3.7 billion annual ad business to marketers.

FJP: This is big data at work — for many businesses, there’s a lot to find when comparing data sets that follow consumer behavior online and in stores.

When the Going Gets Weird, the Weird Get Weirder
My local watering hole usually has newspapers on the bar counter. Makes for easy reading over a beer.
A few weeks ago I came across this full-page ad in the New York Post. It’s for a “documentary” called “Dreams From My Real Father” and takes birtherism to even weirder, alternative heights.
As Talking Points Memo explains, “Instead of focusing on claims about the president’s Hawaiian birth certificate, the film is narrated by an Obama impersonator and claims the president is a closeted communist, bent on instilling a ‘classic Stalinist-Marxist agenda upon America at home and abroad.’ A disclaimer for the film notes that many of the scenes are ‘re-creations of probable events, using reasoned logic, speculation, and approximated conversations.’”
It does so by claiming that Obama’s real father was Frank Marshall Davis, a former journalist, and civil rights and labor activist. Evidently, he got Obama’s mom pregnant, which was scandalous, so the family invented a Kenyon father instead which was somehow less scandalous.
If you’ve worked in print you know that the ad department looks for advertisers who reflect well on — and reinforce — the brand. Have a luxury magazine, your sales team is looking for luxury brands. Have a sports magazine, your sales team looks for advertisers that reiterate that lifestyle.
If you’re the New York Post? Well, form follows function.
And if you’re from Alabama, your GOP party chair is a nut job.
As The Mobile Press Register recently reported, Bill Armistead was speaking to a Republican Women’s group and had this to say:

“We have to win this election. This is about our country. Our country will not be the same,” Armistead said. “I’m convinced, if Obama wins, our children and grandchildren will not live under the same conditions that we’ve lived in these wonderful years. Obama has a different ideology than we do.”
Armistead suggested that audience members see the movie ‘2016: Obama’s America,’ a documentary by conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza that is critical of the president.
“If you haven’t seen it, you should,” he said. “But I’m going to tell you about another movie. The name of it is ‘Dreams From My Real Father.’ That is absolutely frightening. I’ve seen it. I verified that it is factual, all of it. People can determine.”

People can determine, indeed. — Michael
Image: Full page ad in the New York Post for Dreams from My Real Father.

When the Going Gets Weird, the Weird Get Weirder

My local watering hole usually has newspapers on the bar counter. Makes for easy reading over a beer.

A few weeks ago I came across this full-page ad in the New York Post. It’s for a “documentary” called “Dreams From My Real Father” and takes birtherism to even weirder, alternative heights.

As Talking Points Memo explains, “Instead of focusing on claims about the president’s Hawaiian birth certificate, the film is narrated by an Obama impersonator and claims the president is a closeted communist, bent on instilling a ‘classic Stalinist-Marxist agenda upon America at home and abroad.’ A disclaimer for the film notes that many of the scenes are ‘re-creations of probable events, using reasoned logic, speculation, and approximated conversations.’”

It does so by claiming that Obama’s real father was Frank Marshall Davis, a former journalist, and civil rights and labor activist. Evidently, he got Obama’s mom pregnant, which was scandalous, so the family invented a Kenyon father instead which was somehow less scandalous.

If you’ve worked in print you know that the ad department looks for advertisers who reflect well on — and reinforce — the brand. Have a luxury magazine, your sales team is looking for luxury brands. Have a sports magazine, your sales team looks for advertisers that reiterate that lifestyle.

If you’re the New York Post? Well, form follows function.

And if you’re from Alabama, your GOP party chair is a nut job.

As The Mobile Press Register recently reported, Bill Armistead was speaking to a Republican Women’s group and had this to say:

“We have to win this election. This is about our country. Our country will not be the same,” Armistead said. “I’m convinced, if Obama wins, our children and grandchildren will not live under the same conditions that we’ve lived in these wonderful years. Obama has a different ideology than we do.”

Armistead suggested that audience members see the movie ‘2016: Obama’s America,’ a documentary by conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza that is critical of the president.

“If you haven’t seen it, you should,” he said. “But I’m going to tell you about another movie. The name of it is ‘Dreams From My Real Father.’ That is absolutely frightening. I’ve seen it. I verified that it is factual, all of it. People can determine.”

People can determine, indeed. — Michael

Image: Full page ad in the New York Post for Dreams from My Real Father.

This is What an Advertising Revenue Free Fall Looks Like
Via Mark J. Perry:

The decline in print newspaper advertising to a 62-year low is amazing by itself, but the sharp decline in recent years is pretty stunning. This year’s ad revenues of $19 billion will be less than half of the $46 billion spent just five years ago in 2007, and a little more than one-third of the $56.5 billion spent in 2004.
Here’s another perspective: It took 50 years to go from about $20 billion in annual newspaper print ad revenue in 1950 (adjusted for inflation) to $63.5 billion in 2000, and then only 12 years to go from $63.5 billion back to less than $20 billion in 2012.
Even when online advertising is added to the print ads (see red line in chart), the combined total spending for print and online advertising this year will still only be about $22.4 billion, less than the $22.47 billion spent on print advertising in 1953.

I think “ooph” is the ongoing sound I hear an industry make. — Michael
Image: Newspaper Advertising Revenue Adjusted for Inflation, 1950 - 2012. Via Carpe Diem.

This is What an Advertising Revenue Free Fall Looks Like

Via Mark J. Perry:

The decline in print newspaper advertising to a 62-year low is amazing by itself, but the sharp decline in recent years is pretty stunning. This year’s ad revenues of $19 billion will be less than half of the $46 billion spent just five years ago in 2007, and a little more than one-third of the $56.5 billion spent in 2004.

Here’s another perspective: It took 50 years to go from about $20 billion in annual newspaper print ad revenue in 1950 (adjusted for inflation) to $63.5 billion in 2000, and then only 12 years to go from $63.5 billion back to less than $20 billion in 2012.

Even when online advertising is added to the print ads (see red line in chart), the combined total spending for print and online advertising this year will still only be about $22.4 billion, less than the $22.47 billion spent on print advertising in 1953.

I think “ooph” is the ongoing sound I hear an industry make. — Michael

Image: Newspaper Advertising Revenue Adjusted for Inflation, 1950 - 2012. Via Carpe Diem.

There are two flavors of interest targeting. For broader reach, you can target more than 350 interest categories, ranging from Education to Home and Garden to Investing to Soccer, as shown in the screenshot below. As an example, if you were promoting a new animated film about dogs, you could select Animation (under Movies and Television), Cartoons (under Hobbies and Interests), and Dogs (under Pets).

If you want to target more precise sets of users, you can create custom segments by specifying certain @​usernames that are relevant to the product, event or initiative you are looking to promote. Custom segments let you reach users with similar interests to that @​username’s followers; they do not let you specifically target the followers of that @​username. If you’re promoting your indie band’s next tour, you can create a custom audience by adding @​usernames of related bands, thus targeting users with the same taste in music.

Twitter Advertising Blog, Interest targeting: Broaden your reach, reach the right audience

What does that mean? Twitter will use your personal browsing history, people you follow and any other data it has about your activity in order for advertisers to microtarget their ads to you.

H/T: Gizmodo.

Muscle Music

I don’t post this to watch Terry Crews trigger beats and instruments by flexing his muscles.

Instead, I post to see what happens after we’ve enjoyed that.

Namely, give the video a few moments to end and then you can start to play Terry’s pecs and abs and quads and whatnot from your keyboard.

Make him flex (try your middle keyboard: ASDF JKL;), hear him play.

If it doesn’t work for you here head over to Vimeo to play with it there. Would be interesting to explore things like this with narrative video — Michael

I thought you were particularly photogenic that day.

Karl Rove, former George W. Bush advisor and founder of Crossroads GPS, to New York Times reporter John Harwood on why Crossroads used a clip of Harwood in an attack ad on Barack Obama. The footage used was a three second clip of Harwood explaining a job report on CNBC. 

John Harwood, New York Times. More News Reports Show Up in Campaign Ads, to Journalists’ Chagrin.

Background: Harwood reports that more political ads this year are using footage from television news programs to lend “credibility” to the claims made in the spots. 

“We try really hard to get credible third-party messengers to deliver facts,” Mark McKinnon, an ad producer who’s worked with Rove on campaigns, tells Harwood. “A fact coming from you is much more believable than a fact coming from us.”

Which is odd if you think about it seeing how shrill certain quarters are about how biased the mainstream media happens to be.