posts about or somewhat related to ‘aggregation’

Slate Rethinks its Aggregation Game →

Slate’s Slatest has long been a favorite for catching up on what’s happening around the tubes. Even though they’ve done the job well, there’s always room for a rethink and redesign.

Via Nieman Lab:

Today Slate is quickening its pace again with a rethink of Slatest. It has hired Josh Voorhees, formerly Politico’s energy reporter, to be aggregator-in-chief and Slatest editor. Instead of three discrete updates a day, Slatest will be updated throughout the day and more bloglike. And a new Slatest design takes a page from uber-aggregator Huffington Post, with big, graphic-heavy images.

Plotz said the old Slatest was no failure — attracting 2 million pageviews per month by the end of last year and 140,000 subscribers to the email newsletter — but that the art of aggregation had moved forward. “Every site in the world that I can think of, including the New York Times, does something like aggregation,” Plotz told me. He said Slatest will stand out by providing utility to readers with the voice, context, and humanity you might not find on the content farm. “This is an active bet on the notion that voice really matters. Having not simply summary, but summary with analysis,” he said. The new design also gives a home to the Trending News Channel, Slate’s effort at tying quick video production to of-the-moment Google Trends data.

You know what is scarce? Time and attention. People are inundated with abundant information these days, and what they look for are trusted aggregators, curators and filters of that information. They seek those out because it saves them time, and lets them direct their attention more efficiently. In other words, people value the aggregation, because it serves a valuable role when the content is infinitely available, but time is not.
Instead of aggregating news headlines, [The Study is] going to aggregate academic papers from universities and think tanks—a genre of writing and thinking that has a lot to add to the world but that doesn’t get much attention from the media. We’re going to marry this academic writing to the day’s headlines, tying together what people are talking about in the world as a whole at any given moment with what various researchers and thinkers have discovered about these topics. Hopefully, if we do a good job, this project will inject some unexpected and valuable perspectives into the political debate.

Richard Just, The New Republic, Introducing ‘The Study’.

Just describes TNR’s hesitation about typical aggregation strategies but the necessity of implementing the practice in general. We think their idea is great and look forward to following as they proceed.

Arianna Strikes Back →

Earlier today we noted an article in which Bill Keller, Executive Editor of the New York Times, took the Huffington Post to task for the way in which it aggregates content.

Later in the day, Arianna struck back:

I wonder what site he’s been looking at. Not ours, as even a casual look at HuffPost will show. Even before we merged with AOL, HuffPost had 148 full-time editors, writers, and reporters engaged in the serious, old-fashioned work of traditional journalism. As long ago as 2009, Frank Rich praised the work of our reporters in his column. Paul Krugman more recently singled out the work of our lead finance writer. Columbia Journalism Review has credited our work for advancing the public’s understanding of the national foreclosure crisis, and a pair of our Washington reporters recently received a major journalism prize. Matthew Yglesias, Felix Salmon, Catherine Rampell, are among the many others who have cited the work of our reporters. Did Keller not notice that? 

She goes on but we leave it at that.

It’s not our purpose here to amplify snark fights in the media space. But, with a high profile attack against her, we think it right to note her response.

I can’t decide whether serious journalism is the kind of thing that lures an audience to a site like The Huffington Post, or if that’s like hiring a top chef to fancy up the menu at Hooters. But if serious journalism is about to enjoy a renaissance, I can only rejoice.

Bill Keller, Executive Editor, New York Times, All the Aggregation That’s Fit to Aggregate.

In which he discusses how he’s number 50 on Forbes’ most powerful people in the world list, frets about people fretting about media and takes a few shots at Arianna.

Smartly, he notes about his top 50 listing: “If I were vaporized by aliens tomorrow, my family would miss me, but the 1,100 journalists of The New York Times would not miss a deadline.”

Microsoft’s Fuse Labs released a nifty new Web app at the LeWeb conference in France. Called Montage, it lets you curate content through a lightweight interface. Simply enter tags and search terms and choose from the results.
Mashable has a nice overview. We’ve played with it briefly and the nice thing about it is it behaves like an App. Quick, slick, easy to use and fun.
Downside? The URLs it gives you to promote your curated creations are very, very, long.

Microsoft’s Fuse Labs released a nifty new Web app at the LeWeb conference in France. Called Montage, it lets you curate content through a lightweight interface. Simply enter tags and search terms and choose from the results.

Mashable has a nice overview. We’ve played with it briefly and the nice thing about it is it behaves like an App. Quick, slick, easy to use and fun.

Downside? The URLs it gives you to promote your curated creations are very, very, long.

I pretend not to care not to care about journalism, but I sort of do. It’s no longer enough just to throw out the rehashes.

— Nick Denton, Founder, Gawker Media

(Source: venturebeat.com)