Posts tagged al jazeera

The Working Journalist's Style Guide

Al Jazeera kicks off a 26-part series with the letter A.

To wit:

accident. n., Airstrike in Afghanistan by NATO/ISAF forces usually killing scores of men, women and children.     

airstrike. n., See accident.

alleviate. v. tr., Often used by the UN secretary-general. Usually sandwiched between “aim to” and “poverty”.

answer. n., Something said or done in reaction to question from anchor, often interjected or cut-off before point is made.

authentic. adj., Youtube video and/or blog or Facebook update from activist in restive country. For immediate broadcast.

Al Jazeera English to be honored with Columbia Journalism Award

May 4, 2011

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism will bestow its highest honor, the Columbia Journalism Award, to Al Jazeera English. The award is given annually during the school’s commencement ceremony to recognize an individual or organization for “singular journalism in the public interest.”

I am worried about them. The Libyan authorities are crazy and can do whatever they want. They promised that they would set him free, but now I cannot get hold of him.

Al Jazeera journalist Sammir Shatara on the re-arrest of Norwegian photographer and journalist Ammar Al-Hamdan and three colleagues.

Al-Hamdan was orginally captured on March 7, released, and then arrested again over the weekend.

Ramona Tancau, The Foreigner, Norwegian Al-Jazeera journalist recaptured.

How Brand Identity Affects Perceptions of the News

William Youmans and Katie Brown, PhD candidates at the University of Michigan, have published a fascinating paper on how Al Jazeera English is viewed in the United States.

In their study, they showed 177 participants a news clip [above] of “the Taliban’s position towards peace talks.”

The first group watched the original clip with AJE’s branding…

…The second group saw the same news piece re-edited to carry CNN International’s (CNNI) logo…

…The third group, the control, viewed no clip. We then asked participants in each group to rate, in general, how biased they thought AJE and CNNI were.

Watching the AJE clip — branded as AJE — did not seem to have an impact on perceptions of bias; bias ratings were equal between those in the AJE-clip-watching group and the control group.

But in the group that had just watched the clip with fake CNNI branding, participants rated CNNI as less biased than those in the control group.

Paper (PDF) | Arab Media Society | Nieman Lab

Youmans and Brown go on to discuss AJE’s difficulty breaking into the US cable market, saying the issue is part politics and part perceived market potential.

negevrockcity:

Al Jazeera in Talks With Comcast, Time Warner | Fast Company
Al Jazeera English may be coming to American television screens. The Qatar-based network is currently in talks with cable giants Comcast and Time Warner, creating a groundswell of enthusiasm among American news junkies and a collective groan from right-leaning conservative activists. At the moment, Al Jazeera English is only available on a handful of local cable outlets in Washington, D.C., Burlington, Vt., and a few other locales.

negevrockcity:

Al Jazeera in Talks With Comcast, Time Warner | Fast Company

Al Jazeera English may be coming to American television screens. The Qatar-based network is currently in talks with cable giants Comcast and Time Warner, creating a groundswell of enthusiasm among American news junkies and a collective groan from right-leaning conservative activists. At the moment, Al Jazeera English is only available on a handful of local cable outlets in Washington, D.C., Burlington, Vt., and a few other locales.

soupsoup:

Hillary Clinton: ‘America Is Losing’ An Information War That ‘Al Jazeera Is Winning’

Testifying before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Secretary Clinton said that an Afghan general once told her he thought all Americans men were wrestlers, and all American women were strippers, because that was all he had seen in media depictions. 

Clinton said that while Arab, Chinese and Russian media are effectively selling their cause around the world, America is cutting back, and losing the critical information war.

The world’s connected, part 304,378: Kashmiri cartoonist Malik Sajad sends this cartoon of unrest in the Middle East to Al Jazeera English.

The world’s connected, part 304,378: Kashmiri cartoonist Malik Sajad sends this cartoon of unrest in the Middle East to Al Jazeera English.

The Future of Online Video?

GigaOm’s Josh Levy outlines the promise and difficulty Web video is having in the American media landscape.

While writing about how Roku, a set-top box that lets you stream Web video to your television, added Al Jazeera English so that users could watch the Egyptian protests, cable providers are fighting against consumer ability to cut the cord.

Roku’s move was a thrilling taste of what online TV might look like if big cable loses its grip on channels and viewers. Imagine if more channels, sick of waiting in virtual holding pens to be allowed to join cable lineups, instead just joined up with Roku or one of its competitors. And then imagine if viewers followed these channels off the cable reservation, cut their cords and relied solely on little Internet boxes for their TV content.

It would be a shiny future for online video. Except the cable giants won’t stand for it, and are using all their power to stop it: The cords that pipe in your cable TV also deliver the Internet, and big cable is all too eager to exploit that fact, threatening to throttle or block content they don’t like or that competes with them.

Independent online video efforts are running into problems left and right, and the cable giants are trying to stymie them for as long as possible while they test out their “TV Everywhere” offerings — which is their attempt at rolling out online video services without allowing subscribers to “cut the cord.” Thanks to loopholes in a recent FCC decision, there are a number of ways Comcast and friends could degrade or throttle Netflix, Hulu and other channels offered by Roku.

It’s true that with more innovations like Roku’s addition of Al-Jazeera English, the future of online video could be bright. But if big cable succeeds in squashing competition and stifling innovation, it could also get really, really dark.

We’ve noted a few times the struggles Al Jazeera English has had entering the US market.
The above graphic comes from the Twitter Media blog in which they explain how AJZ is using Promoted Tweets to effectively turn the platform into a new kind of television distribution system.

Al Jazeera is using Promoted Tweets to a) report the news; b) position itself as the authority on this story; and c) drive viewers to its live stream. The result? Twitter is one of the top referrers to a site that’s seen a 2,500% jump in traffic since January 25.
According to Riyaad Minty, head of social media at Al Jazeera English, the @AJEnglish team is operating their Promoted Tweets campaign just like a news desk.
As stories pick up steam—for instance, word gets out that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is about to make another statement—the team tweets relevant information and promotes it, making sure it’s ready and waiting if and when “Mubarak” becomes a Trending Topic and Twitter users click his name, looking for more information. (Remember, the the Washington Post did something similar on Election Day 2010.)

It’s worth reading the entire post to learn about AJZ’s strategy and how they and other publishers are harnessing topics to drive audiences to their coverage.

We’ve noted a few times the struggles Al Jazeera English has had entering the US market.

The above graphic comes from the Twitter Media blog in which they explain how AJZ is using Promoted Tweets to effectively turn the platform into a new kind of television distribution system.

Al Jazeera is using Promoted Tweets to a) report the news; b) position itself as the authority on this story; and c) drive viewers to its live stream. The result? Twitter is one of the top referrers to a site that’s seen a 2,500% jump in traffic since January 25.

According to , head of social media at Al Jazeera English, the team is operating their Promoted Tweets campaign just like a news desk.

As stories pick up steam—for instance, word gets out that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is about to make another statement—the team tweets relevant information and promotes it, making sure it’s ready and waiting if and when “Mubarak” becomes a Trending Topic and Twitter users click his name, looking for more information. (Remember, the the Washington Post did something similar on Election Day 2010.)

It’s worth reading the entire post to learn about AJZ’s strategy and how they and other publishers are harnessing topics to drive audiences to their coverage.

The live feed from Egypt is riveting. We can’t get enough of revolution video — even if, some nights, Middle West blizzards take precedence over Middle East battles on the networks’ evening news. But more often than not we have little or no context for what we’re watching. That’s the legacy of years of self-censored, superficial, provincial and at times Islamophobic coverage of the Arab world in a large swath of American news media. Even now we’re more likely to hear speculation about how many cents per gallon the day’s events might cost at the pump than to get an intimate look at the demonstrators’ lives…



…That we often don’t know as much about the people in these countries as we do about their Tweets is a testament to the cutbacks in foreign coverage at many news organizations — and perhaps also to our own desire to escape a war zone that has for so long sapped American energy, resources and patience. We see the Middle East on television only when it flares up and then generally in medium or long shot.
Frank Rich, New York Times, Wallflowers at the Revolution
Staring down governments that want to monopolize information in the Arab world, however, is hardly new to Al Jazeera. At this moment, though, I question whether this is exactly what has also happened to Al Jazeera English in America. There, too, we are almost completely shut out.

That’s quite concerning, as the U.S. media market rests on sturdy democratic principles, namely the First Amendment and the freedom of expression. But ever since Al Jazeera’s English channel first sought to broadcast in the States, roadblocks have marked every turn.
Wadah Khanfar, Director-General, Al Jazeera, Not Coming to America (via Newsweek).

Perhaps the most subversive anti-Western propaganda news network Al Jazeera has ever created. Sophisticated and sinister, it succeeds not because it unleashes a frontal assault, but because the nature of wealth inequality, debt and the costs of war are laid out in a cartoonish mockery of the status quo. Accompanied by the theme song from Tetris, this definitely looks like it would be a fun video game to play. Oh wait…

Al Jazeera Moves to Crowdsource

Al Jazeera’s broadcast signal’s been blocked, some of its equipment confiscated and the Internet itself is still down in Egypt but the news organization is calling on bloggers and citizen journalists to submit information and media through its site.

Here for Arabic. And here for English.