Posts tagged andy carvin

For people who’ve followed me on Twitter, they’ve gotten to know many of the people I tweet about as characters in a broader Arab Spring narrative. You see their ups and downs, the hopes fulfilled and their dreams dashed. But because it’s happening over twitter, you’re not experiencing these stories in the past tense. You’re experiencing them in the present – as present as you can get. And my characters are real people, whether they use their real names or are forced to use pseudonyms for their own safety.

Andy Carvin, interviewed by Jesse Hicks. The Verge. Tweeting the news: Andy Carvin test pilots Twitter journalism.

For those who don’t know much about NPR’s Andy Carvin, this is a good primer. For those who know who he is, you probably know that he has a book coming out too — about his time reporting the Arab Spring on Twitter.

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again
One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.
He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again

One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.

He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.

Andy Carvin on how NPR uses Facebook. “We use the lens: Will our friends want to talk about this?" Via: This article on how NPR is experimenting with member station content on Facebook.

Via Poynter: 

NPR senior strategist and Twitter maven Andy Carvin tweeted an astounding 1,201 times this weekend, including 879 on Sunday, according to Twittercounter.com. The flurry came as he covered the escalating Libyan revolution. At the close of Sunday, Carvin noted he “wouldn’t be surprised if this is the most I’ve tweeted in a single day since Mubarak resigned. Around 900 tweets so far. Oy.” It is at least the most in the past six months, according to Twitter Counter.

Glad someone’s doing it but that’s insane.

Via Poynter

NPR senior strategist and Twitter maven Andy Carvin tweeted an astounding 1,201 times this weekend, including 879 on Sunday, according to Twittercounter.com. The flurry came as he covered the escalating Libyan revolution. At the close of Sunday, Carvin noted he “wouldn’t be surprised if this is the most I’ve tweeted in a single day since Mubarak resigned. Around 900 tweets so far. Oy.” It is at least the most in the past six months, according to Twitter Counter.

Glad someone’s doing it but that’s insane.

Andy Carvin Sits in a Bar

  • Bartender: Who were those guys?
  • Andy Carvin: Egyptian revolutionaries.
  • Bartender: Wish I'd known. Would've given them shots of Cuervo on the house.
  • FJP: Andy Carvin, NPR's Senior Strategist, hangs out in a bar. Carvin's been called a one man newswire as he tweets and retweets revolution in North Africa and the Middle East: http://bit.ly/gtM9z1

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On Monday’s edition of NPR’s All Things Considered, host Robert Siegal interviewed Andy Carvin, NPR’s Senior Strategist for Social Media.

Carvin has virtually become a one man news wire with his Twitter curation of MENA protests in Egypt, Tunisia and Libya among other hotspots. In this brief interview, Carvin explains his processes, how he tries to verify trusted sources and a little bit about what the medium and platform is doing for journalism.

Typically what happens is I start in a country and just think about who are the people that I already know. So, for example, during the Egyptian and the Tunisian uprisings, I had a lot of contacts in each country, at least half a dozen or so that I felt comfortable re-tweeting. And then as time goes by, you get a sense of who they trust as well. Who are they talking to? Who are they re-tweeting?

Libya has been a lot more complex because there aren’t many people there who are on Twitter, rumors of it being shut down altogether. And so, it’s been tough. I had to essentially start from scratch in order to find some sources there. But fortunately, there do seem to be some, including one young man who’s been sending out a live video stream. He’s reporting what he’s hearing from friends around the country. And it’s been absolutely riveting.

Run Time: 4:43. Transcript.