‘animation’ posts

For dads. 

via (this guy)

The Power of Empathy

Via Fast Company:

Dr. Brene Brown’s 2010 TED Talk on “The Power of Vulnerability” has gotten nearly 12.5 million views online. And it’s no wonder: Brown delivers insights into human connection, vulnerability, authenticity, and shame with humor and deeply personal stories that avoid the kind of platitudes and sugarcoating that self-help skeptics love to hate. Now, a clever new animation from RSA shorts, animated by Bristol-based Katy Davis (AKA Gobblynne), brings Brown’s wise words to life with cartoons of a sad fox, an empathetic bear, and a judgmental reindeer.

Important for reporters and their interactions with subjects. More important for all of us and our interactions in life.

Developer Creates Sex-bot For Oculus Rift 

When FJP covered virtual reality and animation fetishes, it was established that developers would eventually create a lifelike erotic experience for Oculus Rift users. As it turns out, eventually is now.

According to gaming site Kotaku, the Oculus Rift was combined with a Tenga Love Tube and Novint Falcon haptic control device to make a sex simulator called VR Tenga. Basically, the device moves up and down to simulate that a person is receiving a hand-job. The developer responsible for the sex-bot goes by the name ‘Ressentiment’ says the Daily Mail,

FJP: Pretty soon you’ll be able to “woohoo" with all your favorite animated characters. Woohoo? — Krissy

Video: Hayato Ikeya

History of Israel/Palestine, Animation Edition

Nina Paley, copyleft advocate and creator of the ever lovely Sita Sings the Blues, takes on the history of Israel/Palestine in this animated short.

Starting with with the first human settlers of the region to the Egyptians, Assyrians and Romans who each controlled it throughout the millennia, she navigates her way down to current day Israelis and Palestinians while focusing on a a fairly simple theme: it’s a perpetual and ongoing battleground.

Confused who’s who? View Nina’s Viewer Guide to her cast of characters.

Run Time: ~3:30

The Story of Physics… Up To Einstein Edition

Via physicsphysics:

BBC Science Club came up with this tremendous short animation video detailing the history of physics. You probably know the names —Galileo, Newton, Einstein— but this video dives into a few things that you probably weren’t taught.

Directed by Asa Lucander.

FJP: Delightful.

Louis CK Animation About Global Warming

John Roney created an animated video tribute to Louis CK featuring the comedian’s bit on what God would say to humans about global warming if He were to return to Earth.

Spoiler: “What the fuck did you do?!”

Animated Video Explains Cell Phone Data Mining

Motion designer, Michael Rigley, created an animated video called “Network,” that describes cell phone data mining. The video discusses what kind of information is being transmitted to cellular providers, how that information is stored, how long it’s stored for, and how it’s being used.

According to Rigley, 736 pieces of the average user’s data are collected every day. Over a million pieces of that data (spanning the past 45 months) are in the cell phone provider’s possession — and that collection of data forms your “digital identity.” Just by using a network, you’re automatically volunteering that data to be sold for intrusive purposes (i.e. affected search results and advertisements).

FJP: Who else would have been more surprised if these providers WEREN’T using our information? #jadedmillennial  - Krissy

cheatsheet:

Maurice Sendak would have been 85 today. Watch this animated short with audio from a Newsweek interview in which he talks about his childhood. 

FJP: The latest in the series by PBS Digital Studios & Blank on Blank. We love it. See also: The Beastie Boys on Being Stupid and James Brown on Conviction, Respect and Reagan.

Bonus: Our interview with Blank on Blank’s founder.

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away
Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.
Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 
Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy
Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away

Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.

Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 

Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy

Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

If Marijuana’s Your Beat, Careful What You Eat

Lessons learned — animation style — from Michael Montgomery of the Center for Investigative Reporting.

And That’s How a Woman Shuts it Down

As Republican candidates continue with their odd rape theories, we take a look inside the lady parts to see how a woman can “shut it down.”

Biologically speaking, it all begins with a dinosaur named Marcy.

Typesetter Blues

In a 3-minute animated short, Harold, a typesetter with a font fetish for the ornate and curly falls in love with a new co-worker. Problem? Her typographic fascinations lead her to another man.

Illustration and animation by Hector Herrera. Words by Pazit Cahlon. Voiced by Gordon Pinsent.

Typesetter Blues is the first “chapter” of Beastly Bards and is a finalist in the Adobe Design Achievement Awards for animation.

NASA Animation of Temperature Data from 1880-2011

Via The Climate Desk, “a journalistic collaboration dedicated to exploring the impact—human, environmental, economic, political—of a changing climate. The partners are The Atlantic, Center for Investigative Reporting, Grist, The Guardian, Mother Jones, Slate, Wired, and PBS’s new public-affairs show Need To Know.” 

Totally like whatever, you know?

A typographical animation of a Taylor Mali poem by Ronnie Bruce in which we’re asked whether we’re “the most aggressively inarticulate generation to come along since… you know, a long, long time ago!”