posts about or somewhat related to ‘anniversaries’

Titanic, Third Class (Emigrant) Ticket
One hundred years ago today the Titanic left Southampton England en route to France and then Ireland to pick up additional passengers for its maiden voyage.
Four days later it hit an iceberg 375 miles south of Newfoundland.
If you were a third class passenger, your chance of survival was 25 percent. 
First class passengers had a 62 percent survival rate. Second class passengers had a 41 percent survival rate. The crew had a 24 percent survival rate.
Image: An Emigrant — or third class — ticket for Lillian Asplund. Via Boston.com.

Titanic, Third Class (Emigrant) Ticket

One hundred years ago today the Titanic left Southampton England en route to France and then Ireland to pick up additional passengers for its maiden voyage.

Four days later it hit an iceberg 375 miles south of Newfoundland.

If you were a third class passenger, your chance of survival was 25 percent

First class passengers had a 62 percent survival rate. Second class passengers had a 41 percent survival rate. The crew had a 24 percent survival rate.

Image: An Emigrant — or third class — ticket for Lillian Asplund. Via Boston.com.

Life celebrates its 75th anniversary this monthThe original Life was a humor and general interest magazine that ran from 1883 until Henry Luce purchased the magazine in 1936 in order to acquire the name.
Luce also created Time, Fortune and Sports Illustrated. Not a bad publishing legacy at all. Although, as NPR points out in recent story, “Of course, Henry Luce’s magazines had their detractors. One line went, “Life is for people who can’t read; Time is for people who can’t think.”Bonus Points: A Life photo archive in collaboration with Google.

Life celebrates its 75th anniversary this month

The original Life was a humor and general interest magazine that ran from 1883 until Henry Luce purchased the magazine in 1936 in order to acquire the name.

Luce also created Time, Fortune and Sports Illustrated. Not a bad publishing legacy at all. Although, as NPR points out in recent story, “Of course, Henry Luce’s magazines had their detractors. One line went, “Life is for people who can’t read; Time is for people who can’t think.”

Bonus Points: A Life photo archive in collaboration with Google.

Happy 50th, Phantom Tollbooth

A Kickstarter campaign to create a documentary with the book’s author, Norton Juster, and illustrator, Jules Feiffer, is here.

Via Adam Gopnik in the New Yorker:

Milo is also one of the few protagonists in children’s literature—Dorothy is another—who have a wiser best friend throughout their journey, in this case Tock, the watchdog. Just as Dorothy learns from the smart Scarecrow, Milo learns from Tock’s timekeeper’s knowledge. Milo doesn’t educate himself; he gets educated. His epiphany is that math and reading and even spelling are themselves subjects of adventure, if seen from the right angle. The point of “The Phantom Tollbooth” is not that there’s more to life than school; it’s that normal school subjects can be wonderful if you don’t have to experience them as normal schooling…

…For “The Phantom Tollbooth” is not just a manifesto for learning; it is a manifesto for the liberal arts, for a liberal education, and even for the liberal-arts college. (Juster, who, knowing that he had started out with a classic, went on to publish sparingly, if beautifully—his visual romance “The Dot and the Line” is his best-known later work—spent most of his career as an architect and as a teacher at Hampshire College.) What Milo discovers is that math and literature, Dictionopolis and Digitopolis, should assume their places not under the pentagon of Purpose and Power but under the presidency of Rhyme and Reason. Learning isn’t a set of things that we know but a world that we enter.