posts about or somewhat related to ‘ap’

AP: Next Stop, North Korea
The AP opens first Western news bureau in North Korea.
Via the Associated Press:

The Associated Press opened its newest bureau here Monday, becoming the first international news organization with a full-time presence to cover news from North Korea in words, pictures and video.
In a ceremony that came less than a month after the death of longtime ruler Kim Jong Il and capped nearly a year of discussions, AP President and CEO Tom Curley and a delegation of top AP editors inaugurated the office, situated inside the headquarters of the state-run Korean Central News Agency in downtown Pyongyang…
…The bureau puts AP in a position to document the people, places and politics of North Korea across all media platforms at a critical moment in its history, with Kim’s death and the ascension of his young son as the country’s new leader, Curley said in remarks prepared for the opening.
"Beyond this door lies a path to vastly larger understanding and cultural enrichment for millions around the world," Curley said. "Regardless of whether you were born in Pyongyang or Pennsylvania, you are aware of the bridge being created today."
Curley said the Pyongyang bureau will operate under the same standards and practices as AP bureaus worldwide.
"Everyone at The Associated Press takes his or her responsibilities of a free and fair press with utmost seriousness," he said. "We pledge to do our best to reflect accurately the people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea as well as what they do and say."

Image: Associated Press President Tom Curley, left, and Korean Central News Agency President Kim Pyong Ho hang the Associated Press Pyongyang sign on the door to open a new AP bureau in Pyongyang, North Korea on Monday Jan. 16, 2012. Via the AP.

AP: Next Stop, North Korea

The AP opens first Western news bureau in North Korea.

Via the Associated Press:

The Associated Press opened its newest bureau here Monday, becoming the first international news organization with a full-time presence to cover news from North Korea in words, pictures and video.

In a ceremony that came less than a month after the death of longtime ruler Kim Jong Il and capped nearly a year of discussions, AP President and CEO Tom Curley and a delegation of top AP editors inaugurated the office, situated inside the headquarters of the state-run Korean Central News Agency in downtown Pyongyang…

…The bureau puts AP in a position to document the people, places and politics of North Korea across all media platforms at a critical moment in its history, with Kim’s death and the ascension of his young son as the country’s new leader, Curley said in remarks prepared for the opening.

"Beyond this door lies a path to vastly larger understanding and cultural enrichment for millions around the world," Curley said. "Regardless of whether you were born in Pyongyang or Pennsylvania, you are aware of the bridge being created today."

Curley said the Pyongyang bureau will operate under the same standards and practices as AP bureaus worldwide.

"Everyone at The Associated Press takes his or her responsibilities of a free and fair press with utmost seriousness," he said. "We pledge to do our best to reflect accurately the people of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea as well as what they do and say."

Image: Associated Press President Tom Curley, left, and Korean Central News Agency President Kim Pyong Ho hang the Associated Press Pyongyang sign on the door to open a new AP bureau in Pyongyang, North Korea on Monday Jan. 16, 2012. Via the AP.

 
Eric Carvin’s social media goal: ‘To get to every last journalist at AP’

“We have people everywhere and their skill levels are widely varied. Most AP journalists have a good understanding of social media’s benefits, but there are people who know more, and people who know less. I’ll be involved with training efforts hoping to get to every last journalist at AP.”

Via Alicia Shepard at Poynter, 

Eric Carvin’s social media goal: ‘To get to every last journalist at AP’

“We have people everywhere and their skill levels are widely varied. Most AP journalists have a good understanding of social media’s benefits, but there are people who know more, and people who know less. I’ll be involved with training efforts hoping to get to every last journalist at AP.”

Via Alicia Shepard at Poynter, 

Doing News Right? The AP's New Licensing Venture →

The Associated Press, along with 28 other news organizations, launched NewsRight yesterday. The goal is license member content out to commercial aggregators.

Included in the service is an analytics suite that NewsRight’s creators says will let publishers understand what’s happening with their content. Via a NewsRight press release:

NewsRight will make it easy for publishers and third parties to access and use these data in editorial, marketing, advertising, public relations and other contexts involving the analysis of news events. Using the News Registry, a content measurement system developed at the Associated Press, NewsRight currently measures several billion impressions a month on news content from participating publishers. NewsRight participants and clients will receive real-time measurements about news patterns and how registered content is being used across digital platforms.

Over at Poynter, Rick Edmonds points out that NewsRight has competitors such as the older non-profit Copyright Clearance Center and the newer Attributor, but believes the move is putting the industry on track for a comprehensive paid digital content strategy:

Should NewsRight catch on big, as it founders hope, the industry will have in place a second leg to a paid digital content strategy. Paywalls and bundled print/digital subscriptions had a snowballing adoption curve in 2011 that will continue into this year. The New York Times metered model and its variations essentially ask heavy direct users of news websites to pay some of the cost of generating content.

NewsRight aims to apply the same strategy to aggregators, targeting those who make heavy (and commercial) use of content originated elsewhere. They are being asked to become payers rather than free riders.

 
AP Exclusive: CIA following Twitter, Facebook


McLEAN, Va. (AP) — In an anonymous industrial park in Virginia, in an unassuming brick building, the CIA is following tweets — up to 5 million a day.
At the agency’s Open Source Center, a team known affectionately as the “vengeful librarians” also pores over Facebook, newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms — anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.
From Arabic to Mandarin Chinese, from an angry tweet to a thoughtful blog, the analysts gather the information, often in native tongue. They cross-reference it with the local newspaper or a clandestinely intercepted phone conversation. From there, they build a picture sought by the highest levels at the White House, giving a real-time peek, for example, at the mood of a region after the Navy SEAL raid that killed Osama bin Laden or perhaps a prediction of which Mideast nation seems ripe for revolt.
Yes, they saw the uprising in Egypt coming; they just didn’t know exactly when revolution might hit, said the center’s director, Doug Naquin.
The center already had “predicted that social media in places like Egypt could be a game-changer and a threat to the regime,” he said in a recent interview with The Associated Press at the center. CIA officials said it was the first such visit by a reporter the agency has ever granted.



read the rest of the article at Yahoo! News

AP Exclusive: CIA following Twitter, Facebook

McLEAN, Va. (AP) — In an anonymous industrial park in Virginia, in an unassuming brick building, the CIA is following tweets — up to 5 million a day.

At the agency’s Open Source Center, a team known affectionately as the “vengeful librarians” also pores over Facebook, newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms — anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.

From Arabic to Mandarin Chinese, from an angry tweet to a thoughtful blog, the analysts gather the information, often in native tongue. They cross-reference it with the local newspaper or a clandestinely intercepted phone conversation. From there, they build a picture sought by the highest levels at the White House, giving a real-time peek, for example, at the mood of a region after the Navy SEAL raid that killed Osama bin Laden or perhaps a prediction of which Mideast nation seems ripe for revolt.

Yes, they saw the uprising in Egypt coming; they just didn’t know exactly when revolution might hit, said the center’s director, Doug Naquin.

The center already had “predicted that social media in places like Egypt could be a game-changer and a threat to the regime,” he said in a recent interview with The Associated Press at the center. CIA officials said it was the first such visit by a reporter the agency has ever granted.

read the rest of the article at Yahoo! News

AP releases a new edition of Social Media Guidelines

example:

RETWEETING

Retweets, like tweets, should not be written in a way that looks like you’re expressing a personal opinion on the issues of the day. A retweet with no comment of your own can easily be seen as a sign of approval of what you’re relaying. For instance:

RT @jonescampaign smith’s policies would destroy our schools

RT @dailyeuropean at last, a euro plan that works bit.ly/xxxxx.

These kinds of unadorned retweets must be avoided.

However, we can judiciously retweet opinionated material if we make clear we’re simply reporting it, much as we would quote it in a story. Colons and quote marks help make the distinction:

RT Jones campaign now denouncing smith on education: @jonescampaign smith’s policies would destroy our schools

RT big European paper praises euro plan: @dailyeuropean “at last, a euro plan that works” bit.ly/xxxxx.

These cautions apply even if you say on your Twitter profile that retweets do not constitute endorsements.

(Source: ap.org)

AP, Google Team Up on Scholarship Award →

If you’re an undergraduate or graduate student with a focus on journalism, innovation and technology, run this way.

Via the Online News Association:

The Associated Press and Google announce a new national scholarship program intended to foster digital and new media skills in student journalists. The Online News Association, the world’s largest membership organization of digital journalists, will administer the program.

The AP-Google Journalism and Technology Scholarship program will provide $20,000 scholarships for the 2012-13 academic year to six promising undergraduate or graduate students pursuing or planning to pursue degrees at the intersection of journalism, computer science and new media. The program is targeted to individual students creating innovative projects that further the ideals of digital journalism. A key goal is to promote geographic, gender and ethnic diversity, with an emphasis on rural and urban areas.

Applications are now open for the 2012-2013 academic year. Deadline is this January. But why wait until then when you can do it now.

Read up on how Google thinks about the scholarship on the Google Blog.

This is a momentous occasion, a momentous anniversary. We want to, particularly for our own staff, make sure everybody is conforming to certain spellings and definitions.

David Minthorn, the AP’s Deputy Standards Editor, said that the style guide’s size is unusual for being tied to a single news story, but 9/11 made it necessary.

Problems with AP’s new “linking” policy

If anything, the AP’s decision to start linking to original sources is a hindrance. Because now, in addition to news outlets everywhere reproducing the same exact stories, they will all include unlinkedbit.ly URLs.

For the whole article, please see 10,000 Words.

An alert photo editor noticed that the pattern on the dust repeated itself in an unlikely way and subsequent investigations revealed the visual fraud.

A freelance photographer for AP was caught manipulating sand granules in one of his photos of children playing soccer in Argentina. A memo was later sent out announcing that the photographer would no longer be associated with AP as their “reputation is paramount.”

Is this an example of technology as a double-edged sword? What does photo (or even content) manipulation say about credibility in an industry when credibility is the foundation?

H/T: Poynter

Can't "Recall" Facts? Corrections In A Viral News Age →

finger pointing

The Associated Press recently fell for a hoax, reporting that GE was giving back a $3.2 billion tax refund to the United States. A writer at USA Today made fun of the AP for that. Thing is? USA Today had both syndicated and Tweeted the flawed AP story — and he didn’t mention anything about it.

MediaBugs’ Mark Follman asks, now that content aggregation, curation, syndication and Twitter are pervasive in the news, what should disclosures and corrections look like, who should issue them and when?

From his post: 

There may…be an increasing tendency, navigating today’s ephemeral sea of news, to shrug off responsibility for nonproprietary content.

Is that understated, diplomatic or sarcastic? We can’t decide. We’d love to see someone create a technology that automatically corrects factually flawed stories in syndication, though.

Constant, real-time internet deadlines combined with satellite transmission technology mean that it is both desirable and possible to transmit images quickly.

The photographers must use good judgment as to when to keep making pictures and when to peel off to transmit. Sometimes one photographer on a story is asked to file their images early, allowing others to spend more time with the subjects. We always strive to be ‘first, right and relevant’; get great images that are relevant and accurate and deliver them first. So there is pressure to file early, however there’s no point getting inaccurate, irrelevant photos sent in record time as they’ll get lost within hours if not minutes.

Tony Hicks, Regional Photo Editor for Europe and Africa at the Associated Press, explaining one of the ways photojournalism has changed in the digital age.

He’s responding to questions from Phil Coomes, BBC Pictures Editor, who’s exploring how photojournalists can get noticed when organizations such as his receive more than 8,000 images per day from wire services, on top of what their own photographers and freelancers are submitting.

Phil Coomes, BBC, Drowning in Pictures.

Ref Bill Spooner told Rambis he’d “get it back” after a bad call. Then he made an even worse call on Rockets. That’s NBA officiating folks.

Jon Krawczynski, Associated Press, via his Twitter account after a January 24 basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and Houston Rockets.

"Rambis" is the coach of the Timberwolves and had complained about a foul called, and the subsequent points scored because of it, against his team.

Referee Bill Spooner denies the conversation and has sued Krawczynski for defamation. He seeks $75,000 in damages.

Story.

645 million: Associated Press video views on its YouTube channel since 2006.

158 million: MSNBC.com video views in January 2011.

QED: Some say the golden age of video news is now.

645 million: Associated Press video views on its YouTube channel since 2006.

158 million: MSNBC.com video views in January 2011.

QED: Some say the golden age of video news is now.

AP To Launch News Licensing Group →

The Associated Press is set to launch what it’s calling the News Licensing Group this summer, according to a press release from the organization.

The goal is to digitally track the use of content and collect royalties for its use.

Via the Wall Street Journal:

The Associated Press is launching what it hopes is the newspaper industry’s answer to ASCAP, an organization that helps songwriters get paid for every song played in public.

The board of the news cooperative on Thursday approved the formation of an independent entity tasked with tracking and policing the use of content from the AP and its member news organizations, and helping them get paid for it.

The entity, called the News Licensing Group and expected to launch this summer, is the outgrowth of simmering tensions among traditional news organizations over how their material is distributed online. As their readers have migrated online, many traditional news organizations have complained that they haven’t been able to adequately capitalize on the Internet in part because there are so many other websites repurposing their material.

Might be easier said than done.

As Rick Edmonds of Poynter observes:

But as AP goes to market with the high-profile service, it will find an established competitor vying to hold a big share of that business.

Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) has been harvesting royalties for re-use of material for more than 30 years. Most big newspapers are among its clients. There is room for multiple vendors in the field, a senior CCC executive told me last month, but AP may find the new venture tricky to perfect.

Fred Haber, CCC’s general counsel, said in a phone interview “there are two distinct sides to the business.” Enforcement involves tracking down unauthorized uses and sending “nastygram” notices to pay up. But the real money comes from establishing an efficient system that matches a large number of payers with a large number of content providers.

Let new copyright wars begin.