Posts tagged with ‘api’

Welcome to the world’s largest online repository of structured, multilingual, usage-based hate speech.

Welcome message from Hatebase.org, a project created by Canadian-based Sentinel Project for Genocide Prevention.

Via Hatebase

Hatebase was built to assist government agencies, NGOs, research organizations and other philanthropic individuals and groups use hate speech as a predictor for regional violence. Language-based classification, or symbolization, is one of a handful of quantifiable steps toward genocide

The site maps incidents of hate speech, structures them across language and type, and invites people to contribute.

Developers can access the Hatebase API here.

Hello, Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America launched today with “photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States.”
Its goal is to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.”
Exhibitions are here. And your inner hacker can access the DPLA’s API here. Yes, the library has an API, which is awesome. One app currently using it is the Library Observatory:

Library Observatory is an interactive tool for searching and visualizing the DPLA collections, accompanied by an interactive documentary that weaves together history, visualizations, and audio about the making, use, and enduring significance of library data and the collections they describe.

Another app searches both the DPLA and Europeana, a European project similar to it, simultaneously giving results from each.
Start exploring.

Hello, Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America launched today with “photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States.”

Its goal is to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.”

Exhibitions are here. And your inner hacker can access the DPLA’s API here. Yes, the library has an API, which is awesome. One app currently using it is the Library Observatory:

Library Observatory is an interactive tool for searching and visualizing the DPLA collections, accompanied by an interactive documentary that weaves together history, visualizations, and audio about the making, use, and enduring significance of library data and the collections they describe.

Another app searches both the DPLA and Europeana, a European project similar to it, simultaneously giving results from each.

Start exploring.

Sunlight Foundation Launches Open States

Via the Sunlight Foundation:

After more than four years of work from volunteers and a full-time team here at Sunlight we’re immensely proud to launch the full Open States site with searchable legislative data for all 50 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico. Open States is the only comprehensive database of activities from all state capitols that makes it easy to find your state lawmaker, review their votes, search for legislation, track bills and much more.

If you watch the video one of the important points of tracking the legislative data is that laws and such often flow up from the state to federal level rather than the other way around.

Consider it an early warning system of a type.

Data is available on the Open States Web site, through APIs and through bulk downloads.

Fortunately, my polling place is around the corner from my apartment.
Not quite sure where yours is? There’s a Web site for that.
Geeky stuff: Fun(ny) design aside, the site pulls data from the Google Civic Information API.

Fortunately, my polling place is around the corner from my apartment.

Not quite sure where yours is? There’s a Web site for that.

Geeky stuff: Fun(ny) design aside, the site pulls data from the Google Civic Information API.

Tumblr Firehose Now Brought to you by Gnip
Gnip, a Colorado-based startup that provides data streams from sources such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, announced an exclusive deal to distribute the Tumblr firehose.
Gnip, and services like it, is used by companies to monitor conversation and activity across social networks.
Via Gnip CEO Chris Moody:

I’m thrilled to announce that the full firehose of public Tumblr posts is now available exclusively from Gnip. Tumblr is one of the fastest growing social networks in the world. Much of this growth is fueled by the enormous number of conversations that are unique to the Tumblr community. These conversations cover a huge range of subjects, from movies, TV shows and fashion to business, apparel and consumer products…
…It doesn’t take a large leap to see the impact this type of information can have on brand management and product development. The conversations on Tumblr are rich in images and discussion about brands and products, from simply sharing a picture about a favorite pair of shoes to reblogging news about favorite brand. And given the highly social nature of the Tumblr community, these discussions move quickly and broadly through the community. You often see posts that are shared tens of thousands of times. For brands, every conversation matters and access to the full firehose ensures they won’t miss a thing.

Moody notes that 50 million new posts appear on Tumblr each day and that the network had 300% traffic growth last year.

Tumblr Firehose Now Brought to you by Gnip

Gnip, a Colorado-based startup that provides data streams from sources such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, announced an exclusive deal to distribute the Tumblr firehose.

Gnip, and services like it, is used by companies to monitor conversation and activity across social networks.

Via Gnip CEO Chris Moody:

I’m thrilled to announce that the full firehose of public Tumblr posts is now available exclusively from Gnip. Tumblr is one of the fastest growing social networks in the world. Much of this growth is fueled by the enormous number of conversations that are unique to the Tumblr community. These conversations cover a huge range of subjects, from movies, TV shows and fashion to business, apparel and consumer products…

…It doesn’t take a large leap to see the impact this type of information can have on brand management and product development. The conversations on Tumblr are rich in images and discussion about brands and products, from simply sharing a picture about a favorite pair of shoes to reblogging news about favorite brand. And given the highly social nature of the Tumblr community, these discussions move quickly and broadly through the community. You often see posts that are shared tens of thousands of times. For brands, every conversation matters and access to the full firehose ensures they won’t miss a thing.

Moody notes that 50 million new posts appear on Tumblr each day and that the network had 300% traffic growth last year.

Publishers Enter the API Era

Via Digiday:

The tech world is obsessed with platforms. Facebook and Twitter have grown, in large part, thanks to opening up to outside developers. More companies are doing so in the form of application programming interfaces, which allow data to be easily manipulated by others. Foursquare and Spotify are just two recent examples of Internet services opening up their data to others.

Now publishers want in on the action. A handful of news publishers are looking at their vast trove of content as valuable data that developers can use to hack into something new. These efforts at opening APIs, while early, are being done with the hope that someday, new revenue streams will present themselves.

The New York Times now publishes upwards of 16 APIs, having launched its first back in 2007. The Guardian provides data-related APIs, in addition to ones that surfaces over 10 years of editorial content. Even USA Today is moving into content APIs, holding a hackathon in December at its Virginia headquarters that was won by a developer who used the paper’s census data to construct a mobile game in which users would guess the right census numbers.

Read the full article at Digiday.

Amazing use of the Facebook API, a perfect Halloween treat! 
Click on:  http://www.takethislollipop.com/ 

Amazing use of the Facebook API, a perfect Halloween treat! 

Click on:  http://www.takethislollipop.com/ 


Foursquare’s Push API to Be Released Publicly Today


Foursquare’s Push API, which the company first unvieled to developers in February, will be publicly released sometime this afternoon, according to a post on BetaBeat.
Select developers have had access to the API since the company’s last hackathon and have been using it to build applications that take advantage of the Foursquare’s push notifications. The API will go into a public beta just a few days before the company’s global hackathon on Saturday.



Chao: Data nerds rejoice!! I’m really interested to see what kinds of awesome projects come out of this.  
via Read Write Web

Foursquare’s Push API to Be Released Publicly Today

Foursquare’s Push API, which the company first unvieled to developers in February, will be publicly released sometime this afternoon, according to a post on BetaBeat.

Select developers have had access to the API since the company’s last hackathon and have been using it to build applications that take advantage of the Foursquare’s push notifications. The API will go into a public beta just a few days before the company’s global hackathon on Saturday.

Chao: Data nerds rejoice!! I’m really interested to see what kinds of awesome projects come out of this.  

via Read Write Web

MIT’s SENSEable City Lab currently has an exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum.
Called LIVE Singapore!, the MIT group collects realtime data and visualizes it across different categories such as ship traffic (Singapore has the world’s busiest ports), traffic patterns and cell phone use.
As the Lab explains:

Instead of focusing on any one specific application or limited number and type of data stream, this project explores up solutions that can cater for a large number of streams of very different kind of data, emphasizing the possibility of creatively combining multiple streams in the subsequent design of applications on top of the platform.

Pictured above is a visualization of what the team calls Urban Heat Islands. That is, the rise and fall of temperatures throughout the city. As the group notes, “It is documented that temperatures in cities are several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside, but as temperature rises we use more air-conditioning, which in turn results in even higher temperatures.”
Best yet, the Lab is releasing an API for developers to create visualizations of their own.

MIT’s SENSEable City Lab currently has an exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum.

Called LIVE Singapore!, the MIT group collects realtime data and visualizes it across different categories such as ship traffic (Singapore has the world’s busiest ports), traffic patterns and cell phone use.

As the Lab explains:

Instead of focusing on any one specific application or limited number and type of data stream, this project explores up solutions that can cater for a large number of streams of very different kind of data, emphasizing the possibility of creatively combining multiple streams in the subsequent design of applications on top of the platform.

Pictured above is a visualization of what the team calls Urban Heat Islands. That is, the rise and fall of temperatures throughout the city. As the group notes, “It is documented that temperatures in cities are several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside, but as temperature rises we use more air-conditioning, which in turn results in even higher temperatures.”

Best yet, the Lab is releasing an API for developers to create visualizations of their own.

Via Justin Blinder:

“We Read, We Tweet” geographically visualizes the dissemination of New York Times articles through Twitter. Each line connects the location of a tweet to the contextual location of the New York Times article it referenced. The lines are generated in a sequence based on the time in which a tweet occurs. The project explores digital news distribution in a temporal and spatial context through the social space of Twitter. The video only shows a small portion of tweets aggregated from each article, some of which contain of corresponding Tweets.

The articles and tweets are constantly being aggregated and stored in a database, making use of the Twitter, Backtweets, Google Maps, and New York Times Articles API.

Data + APIs = Sexy

Two things I find sexy: data, and APIs to get at that data.

Actually, there’s a third thing I find sexy: open government and organizations that increase government transparency.

For those counting, that might bring sexy up to four depending on your arithmetic.

So this is what I think: the Sunlight Foundation is a sexy organization. And the sultry group running Sunlight Labs gets data wonks and Open Gov advocates hot and bothered. 

Here’s what they ostensibly look like.

sunlight labs geeks

And here’s what they’ve recently done:

  • Created the Real Time Congress API that gives developers real-time access to everything going on in Congress from bills to videos to votes and documents.
  • Updated the Open States Project that’s doing very much the same thing on the state level.

This latter work might slip under the radar but is very important.

As Tom Lee writes on the Sunlight Labs Blog:

State legislatures are where vital decisions are made about civil rights, transportation, education, taxes, land use, gun regulation, and a host of other issues. Far too often, these issues don’t get the attention they deserve. It’s a simple question of scale: there are a lot more resources available at the federal level for both lawmakers and journalists. That means state governance both requires more transparency and tends to get less of it. We think technology can help make the situation better — that’s what Open States is all about.

Now it’s up to the rest of us to create great applications around this Open Gov treasure trove.

We’re looking forward to all sorts of new sexy. As a certain captain of a certain Starship Enterprise frequently said, “Make it so.”

And, by the way, they’re hiring.