posts about or somewhat related to ‘app’

This Little-Known iOS Feature Will Change the Way We Connect | Gadget Lab | WIRED →

If “Multipeer Connectivity Framework” and “mesh networking” sound like complicated technologies from the future, it’s because they kind of are (from the future!!! okay, kidding). But they’re not as complicated as they may sound. The app developers behind the new Firechat are harnessing this new technology from Apple to allow iOS device users to find and connect to one another - and then anonymously communicate - all without needing cellular service or WiFi. 

There are numerous reasons this technology could have huge, revolutionary impacts if its successful. While Firechat is now just for exchanging messages and photos, mesh networking could open up the possibilities of a completely independent network for communicating anonymously and privately, sharing files and storing data, and even reaching out from places with limited internet access (think crisis areas, crowded conventions). The implications from this technology would completely disrupt the current cellular service provider system. 

Lulu App Allows Women to Rate Guys They’ve Dated

The Lulu app is a private app for females to review men based on their personal experiences with them. Women sync the app with their Facebook profiles, Lulu locates all their friends who are male, and the app shows the male friends’ ratings and reviews.

The app is only for women — meaning you can’t log in unless you’re listed as a female on Facebook. Women can’t leave personalized reviews, but they can review men based on hashtags provided by the app, which include everything from #GreatHair and #Big.Feet to #TotalF**kingDickhead.

Lulu’s founder, Alexandra Chong, says, “I created the app because my girlfriends and I needed it” — for “girl-talk” apparently. You know, the kind of girl-talk that lets you publicly shame a guy for his past mistakes if you so choose.

FJP: Ladies, we don’t like it when men treat us like numbered pieces of meat that can be defined by a few basic categories. By imitating the habits of chauvinist pigs, we’re doing nothing for feminism and we’re giving guys the right to turn around and rag on us all they want. Don’t be a #TotalF**ckingDickhead. Lead by example, and say no to Lulu. — Krissy

P.S. There’s a Lulu Dude app that allows guys to see their ratings and reviews. But according to this fella, it’s not user-friendly. 

The site is transparently fake and designed to embarrass anyone vain or careless enough to “Invite 25 friends to INSTANTLY reveal” their Lulu score. Given that these scores are for ladies’ eyes only, with plenty of security to that effect, skepticism should prevail here. 

If you bring up the site online, it teases that “2 Girls have favorited you” and “3 Girls have checked you out”—even before you tell it who you are. It also asks to use your location and begins to send you faintly mocking emails (“Hey, handsome,” “Congrats, big man!”) that  encourage the recipient to click on dubious blind links.

#SoLame.

Video: Lulu

NY Times to Release Gesture-based App 
via TechCrunch:

The New York Times says it plans to release a Top News app for Leap Motion, the soon-to-be-released controller that will allow users to interact with their computers through gestures — in fact, it will be the only branded news app for the platform’s launch.
In the case of The Times’ app, users should be able to browse articles by moving their hands left and right. Headlines, images, and summaries will be presented in a card format, and if you see something that interests you, you tap on the card to read the full article. You then scroll through the article by making a circular motion, and you shake your hand to return to the Top News menu.
For now, the app only includes top stories, and there’s no integration with the company’s subscription system. Paul Smurl, The Times’ general manager of core digital products, told me that if the app is popular, the team could go further, adding more content and a login system for Times subscribers.
[…] Apparently Times team members met with Leap Motion while at South by Southwest, and they were impressed by what they saw. The Leap Motion controller, Smurl said, “is much more fine-tuned and sensitive to hand and finger motions than some of the competing technologies out there. … It has enough fine motor sensitivity that a reading experience is enabled and it’s pretty damn good.”

Image: TechCrunch, screen still of New York Times On Leap Motion.

NY Times to Release Gesture-based App 

via TechCrunch:

The New York Times says it plans to release a Top News app for Leap Motion, the soon-to-be-released controller that will allow users to interact with their computers through gestures — in fact, it will be the only branded news app for the platform’s launch.

In the case of The Times’ app, users should be able to browse articles by moving their hands left and right. Headlines, images, and summaries will be presented in a card format, and if you see something that interests you, you tap on the card to read the full article. You then scroll through the article by making a circular motion, and you shake your hand to return to the Top News menu.

For now, the app only includes top stories, and there’s no integration with the company’s subscription system. Paul Smurl, The Times’ general manager of core digital products, told me that if the app is popular, the team could go further, adding more content and a login system for Times subscribers.

[…] Apparently Times team members met with Leap Motion while at South by Southwest, and they were impressed by what they saw. The Leap Motion controller, Smurl said, “is much more fine-tuned and sensitive to hand and finger motions than some of the competing technologies out there. … It has enough fine motor sensitivity that a reading experience is enabled and it’s pretty damn good.”

Image: TechCrunch, screen still of New York Times On Leap Motion.

curiositycounts:

I’d seen snippets raving about the iPad app, Paper, then a coworker showed it to me in person. I think I said something along the lines of “Oh my.”

It’s intuitive, creates a seamless experience and has absolutely gorgeous graphics. So naturally I had to download it and share with the Curiosity Counters. And whether for scribbling notes, sketching or showing off some serious artistic talent, this app is a wonderful (and useful) addition to any creators toolkit. 


Enjoy! 

FJP: Oh my, it is beautiful.

(Source: curiositycounts)

Excerpt of Jeff Sonderman of Poynter article called “New iPad app aggregates only long-form journalism”

The Longform iPad app aggregates editors’ picks of long-form journalism from Longform.org, as well as long stories from 25 sites known for such work, including The Atlantic, Slate, Mother Jones, and Esquire.  
The essential role of an aggregator is to make choices for readers, usually about which topics, sources or issues are worth paying attention to. A new aggregation and reading app launching Wednesday for the iPad holds a different standard — length.
For most sources, the cutoff is 2,000 words, Longform co-founder Max Linsky told me, though editors can exercise discretion to include a great 1,500-word story or cut out a 4,000-word item that doesn’t belong.

you can check out the whole article at Poynter. I think it’s a great idea to highlight long form writing but the app is $4.99 and I wonder is the news companies are getting any of that.  ~Chao. 

Excerpt of Jeff Sonderman of Poynter article called “New iPad app aggregates only long-form journalism”

The Longform iPad app aggregates editors’ picks of long-form journalism from Longform.org, as well as long stories from 25 sites known for such work, including The Atlantic, Slate, Mother Jones, and Esquire.  

The essential role of an aggregator is to make choices for readers, usually about which topics, sources or issues are worth paying attention to. A new aggregation and reading app launching Wednesday for the iPad holds a different standard — length.

For most sources, the cutoff is 2,000 words, Longform co-founder Max Linsky told me, though editors can exercise discretion to include a great 1,500-word story or cut out a 4,000-word item that doesn’t belong.

you can check out the whole article at Poynter. I think it’s a great idea to highlight long form writing but the app is $4.99 and I wonder is the news companies are getting any of that.  ~Chao.