Posts tagged art

The Crossroads of Should and Must
An absolute must-read from artist Elle Luna on Medium on leaving her job at Mailbox to make art. Complete with beautiful illustrations and heaps of wisdom on when to follow “must” and when to follow “should” in life and work (which shouldn’t be two separate things).
Image: Screenshot from the illustrated piece.
Related: Another fantastic read (this one from David Cain), on why procrastination is not laziness.

The Crossroads of Should and Must

An absolute must-read from artist Elle Luna on Medium on leaving her job at Mailbox to make art. Complete with beautiful illustrations and heaps of wisdom on when to follow “must” and when to follow “should” in life and work (which shouldn’t be two separate things).

Image: Screenshot from the illustrated piece.

Related: Another fantastic read (this one from David Cain), on why procrastination is not laziness.

Too Many Friends
Via Web Urbanist:

In a world of mobile devices, share icons and popup alerts, fine art is interrupted by signs and symbols of our times, adding a jarring layer of technology to recognizably classic works.
Nastya Nudnik is the Kiev-based Ukrainian artist behind this project that pairs emoticons and other digital features with familiar images by renowned artists, from Michelangelo to Edward Hopper.

Nudnik’s work can be viewed on Behance.

Too Many Friends

Via Web Urbanist:

In a world of mobile devices, share icons and popup alerts, fine art is interrupted by signs and symbols of our times, adding a jarring layer of technology to recognizably classic works.

Nastya Nudnik is the Kiev-based Ukrainian artist behind this project that pairs emoticons and other digital features with familiar images by renowned artists, from Michelangelo to Edward Hopper.

Nudnik’s work can be viewed on Behance.

An Oral History of Street Fighter 2
Totally fun long-read from Polygon, which takes you through the entire evolution of creating the game as told in snippets from the people behind it. Full of weird anecdotes, like Brian Duke (of Capcom USA) describing Yoshiki Okamoto (Head of Arcade Development):

He would prank you. He’d send over ideas for video games and want me to give him my input, and it would turn out to be porn. … I just remember putting the CD into my laptop and playing it for [then Vice President of Sales and Marketing Bill Cravens] and some other people who were in my office at the time, because I thought [it showed] new games and I wanted to get their input on it as well. And instead, I treated them to a porn display. 

An Oral History of Street Fighter 2

Totally fun long-read from Polygon, which takes you through the entire evolution of creating the game as told in snippets from the people behind it. Full of weird anecdotes, like Brian Duke (of Capcom USA) describing Yoshiki Okamoto (Head of Arcade Development):

He would prank you. He’d send over ideas for video games and want me to give him my input, and it would turn out to be porn. … I just remember putting the CD into my laptop and playing it for [then Vice President of Sales and Marketing Bill Cravens] and some other people who were in my office at the time, because I thought [it showed] new games and I wanted to get their input on it as well. And instead, I treated them to a porn display. 

Eastern vs. Western Perspectives on Daily Life
via Drama Fever:

Yang Liu is an artist who was born in China but lived in Germany from the time she was 14. She designed this series of infographics to represent her observations about Chinese culture and German culture. She covers a broad variety of subjects, from what a typical party looks like to attitudes towards waiting in line.

They’re all pretty great and true.  Above: Moods & Weather.

Eastern vs. Western Perspectives on Daily Life

via Drama Fever:

Yang Liu is an artist who was born in China but lived in Germany from the time she was 14. She designed this series of infographics to represent her observations about Chinese culture and German culture. She covers a broad variety of subjects, from what a typical party looks like to attitudes towards waiting in line.

They’re all pretty great and true.  Above: Moods & Weather.

How to Morph Forrest Gump into Daft Punk

When ad agency Grey London and design studio Us (Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor) came together, they created this stunning ad for The Sunday Times. In total, there are six iconic scenes from art, music, and film, fit into one single steadicam shot.  

From the creators:

This is all about those iconic cultural images that we pin to our walls and stick in our minds. We all have our favourites. Heisenberg, Kraftwerk, and Banksy’s kissing coppers all featured in early scripts, but we wanted to take a snapshot of what’s making the headlines in 2014. Daft Punk winning big at the Grammy’s, The final series of Mad Men, and Tarantino are all over the media right now. These people and their work have left an indelible mark and we’ll probably still be talking about them in ten, twenty maybe even a hundred years years time. The TV spot is a respectful nod to it all.

If you’ve ever seen a steadicam in action, you know how difficult getting everything perfect in one take truly is. If not, see the making of Icons here

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog
A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog

A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

Illustrating Medicine, In History

Images and descriptions via Hagströmerbiblioteket where you can browse 15th through early-20th century illustrations of anatomy, biology, botany and more.

From top to bottom:

Georg Constantin
This extraordinary tattoo is one of over 100 chromolithographed plates in Hebra’s monumental atlas of skin diseases. It shows the naked Georg Constantin from Albania, whose 388 tattoos of all kinds of animals in red and blue cover his face and entire body. Atlas der Hautkrankheiten, (Vienna, 1856-1876)

Anatomical Plate
Hans von Gersdorff, surnamed ’Schylhans’ or ’Squinting Hans’, from Strasburg, was an army surgeon who took part in numerous campaigns, including the Burgundian War (1476). His widely circulated handbook of wound surgery, first published in 1517) was based on forty years of experience, chiefly in various military campaigns. It is illustrated with 25 full-page woodcuts by Hans Wechtlin including the first image in a book of an amputation. Feldtbuch der Wundartzney, (Augsburg, Heinrich Stayner, 1543)

Artificial Mechanical Hand
Paré was a French barber surgeon and the official Royal Surgeon for four successive French kings. He is considered one of the fathers of modern surgery, and a leader of surgical techniques. His collective works were published in several editions, a book of over 1000 pages richly illustrated with woodcuts and among them his inventions of both artificial hands and legs. Les Oeuvres. Quatrième édition, (Paris, 1585)

Anatomical Plate
One of the most spectacular anatomical atlases ever produced. Antonio Serrantoni was responsible for the drawing, engraving, and hand-colouring of the breathtaking plates, which were first published in natural size, in a volume in large elephant folio (70 x 100 cm), which was evidently impossible to use, but later reduced in a new version with the 75 engraved plates in normal folio size, printed in colours and finished by hand, each plate accompanied by a duplicate in outline. Anatomia Universale , (Florence, 1833)

The world needs you. It doesn’t need you at a party having read a book about how to appear smart at parties – these books exist, and they’re tempting – but resist falling into that trap. The world needs you at the party starting real conversations, saying, ‘I don’t know,’ and being kind.

Charlie Kaufman in his (now very famous) BAFTA speech as part of the 2011 Screenwriters’ Lecture Series. Discovered via Bitch Magazine’s recent interview with the ever-wise, ever-creative Rookie Mag editor Tavi Gevinson, on the future of Rookie and teenagerhood.

More: An incredibly moving excerpt from the speech was turned into this 2012 short film by Eliot Rausch and Phos Pictures: What I have to Offer. And, the entire BAFTA series via iTunes podcast is here, much of which is lovely and inspiring and important for writers of all stripes and colors.

Filed under: Media can be therapeutic. And in the ever-forward, way-too-fast cycles of discovery, we have to remember to revisit the best of it often.

You can sense when somebody wants something. It’s all about energy exchange, it’s not about words. That’s what I learned from doing Humans of New York. Somebody’s willingness to let me photograph them, and willingness to tell me a story, has nothing to do with the words I say. It all has to do with the energy I’m giving off, which hopefully is very genuine, very interested energy. It’s It’s just two people having a conversation in the street. I think that’s where genuine content comes from.

Brandon Stanton, the human behind Humans of New York, as quoted in this Mashable profile about his work and his forthcoming book.

Brandon began the project in the summer of 2010 in an effort “to construct a photographic census of New York City”. Originally, the idea was to plot the photos on map, but after speaking with 10,000 strangers (New Yorkers and visitors to NYC), he decided to turn the project into a blog which features a portrait of each person, accompanied with a quote or short story from them. Humans of New york has nearly 1.5 million Facebook fans, over 33,000 Twitter followers and Tumblr posts with notes in the thousands. 

Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer
Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.
Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.
“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.
Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer

Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.

Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.

“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.

Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

Artist Creates Light-Hearted Comics For Heavy-Hearted Creatives
Grant Snider, student of orthodontics and artist extraordinaire, creates a series of light-hearted, inspirational comics about art, writing, and life on his website, Incidental Comics. The comics cover topics from rules for freelancers to drug induced writing enhancement. Fun for all.
Image: How To Make Write by Grant Snider

Artist Creates Light-Hearted Comics For Heavy-Hearted Creatives

Grant Snider, student of orthodontics and artist extraordinaire, creates a series of light-hearted, inspirational comics about art, writing, and life on his website, Incidental Comics. The comics cover topics from rules for freelancers to drug induced writing enhancement. Fun for all.

Image: How To Make Write by Grant Snider

Painting Syria’s Landscape

Via SyriaDeeply:

[Tammam] Azzam achieved more fame than nearly any other Syrian artist since the start of the revolution this February, when he created a piece that overlaid Gustav Klimt’s seminal “The Kiss,” in which a couple shares an idealistic kiss, against a photo of a destructed street in Douma. It was part of a series featuring famous works by Van Gogh, Matisse, Dali and even Andy Warhol, set against destroyed locations in Syria.

As to why “The Kiss” went viral? “Maybe people need love more than war right now. But I preferred the Goya [the Spanish artist’s “Third of May, 1808” against a demolished city street]. I think it shows what’s happening in Syria more than the other one does.”

Images: “The Kiss” (top) and “Third of May, 1808” (bottom) by Tammam Azzam, via SyriaDeeply. Select to embiggen.

If You Love to Create, You Should Create

I’ve recently become obsessed with a food+writing blog called Pupcaked, created with a lot of love and patience by my good friend Zoe. She’s a fantastic cook, journalist, photographer and writer. In her own beautiful words about the project:

Currently, I am taking residence in my hometown, New York, and baking from a small kitchen with a city window… As both a writer and maker of food, I am led to understand that eating is made from both loud and quiet, in an utterance of everywhere and anywhere that life can be savoured — the “journalist” in me will do all that she can to avoid interrupting its serene gaze that’s greased gently with a kind of grace known only to those patient enough to taste it.

In short, “Pupcaked” is an experiment in food-making, food-loving and food culture. I hope that you will join me.

I share it here because I think it represents something worth thinking about: if you love creating, you should create. You should work hard at it, block off a little bit of time each day to dive deeply into it, and you should love it. Zoe cooks, photographs and writes. 

We get a lot of questions from our readers about how to break into journalism, about the correct steps to take to secure a great internship, about how to become a writer or blogger. Our answer is always the same: do it. To quote Michael in his response to one such question

So, you say you want to be a writer but there’s nothing available in your area. In that case, make something available to yourself.

There are stories everywhere. There are stories where there are lots of people. There are stories where they are no people. There are great stories about topics other than people.

So start writing them. Choose something that you’re passionate about. If it’s a character who lives down the street, approach him and ask if you can interview and write about him. If he asks why, and what for, say simply, “I like to write.”

Some people will say no but you’ll be surprised by how many people say yes. People are wonderful that way.

And if your passion is for a subject or topic that requires more discrete expertise, say science or medicine or art or local politics, start reading up and then start calling people up (eg, at local colleges, businesses, governmental agencies and what not) and ask questions.

Again, many will ask why and where will this appear and you simply say, “I like to write and its for a personal site I’m creating.”

And then some will say no but others will say yes but give it a couple months and you have yourself body of work. You’ve gotten started.

Summer has just begun and we suspect some free time comes with it. So, we encourage you to take a break from the internship hunt and get cracking on producing and documenting the little hobby you’ve been thinking about. —Jihii

Image: Coffeecake muffins with cinnamon-walnut streusel (via pupcaked)

The News Machine

Remember Operator, the game where you whisper a message to someone, they whisper the same to another who does the same to another until finally the message comes back to you full of distortions and embellishments? So too COLORS Magazine’s News Machine.

Created for last month’s International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, The News Machine is a commentary on how information systems work, and how discrete items within it get lost in translation — so to speak — as they pass from one medium to another.

Via COLORS:

Designed in collaboration with interactive designer Jonathan Chomko, the COLORS News Machine turns your tweets into headlines, but only after they’ve been passed through all the media filters and technological platforms that disseminate and distort the news today.

Twitter is the largest and least verifiable wire agency in the world. Tweet your story to @colorsmachine and watch the message change as it echoes through different media and into print.

A megaphone will read your tweet out loud. Its tape recorder listens, converting what it hears into text so that the television can show it onscreen. A camera watching the television converts what it sees into a signal to the radio antenna, which broadcasts the tweet. And the waiting microphone interprets this radio address as text again for printing.

Pick up your receipt. Compare the original tweet with the final report. Accuracy of reproduction varies according to the clarity of your writing and to chance.

As Fast Company’s Mark Wilson points out, The News Machine’s “tacit thesis is very difficult to reconcile: Even by stating the truth, you could be helping to spread misinformation.”