Posts tagged with ‘audience engagement’

Pushy Notifications →

AdAge reports that the New York Times and Wall Street Journal are using more push notifications on their mobile and tablet apps than they did in the past.

The move reflects a strategy to increase user engagement with the apps that while downloaded, sometimes sit dormant on people’s devices. Specifically, each newsroom is using notifications for breaking news.

Via AdAge:

The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal — No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, in terms of U.S. digital circulation, according to the Alliance for Audited Media — are putting more emphasis on using mobile alerts to distribute breaking news stories and promote their mobile apps.

News publishers have long considered push notifications, which pop up on phone and tablet screens, too intrusive to use more than sparingly. In recent months, however, The Journal and Times have reconsidered that stance and started using them more often.

"We felt comfortable that our breaking news alerts have been well-received by readers and that we may have been a little too stringent about what alerts we should have been sending," said Jonathan Ellis, deputy editor of digital platforms at The Times, which has revised its guidelines on the subject. "More frequently, we’re asking ourselves the question ‘Should this be a mobile push alert?’"

FJP: The strategy is similar to one used by app developers and their frequent updates, no matter how small. It’s a reminder to the User that the app exists and hopefully prods him or her to use it again.

AdAge reports that those that opt in to push notifications are five times more likely to use an app but does take this warning from Brent Hieggelke, CMO at Urban Airship, “Push is not a channel to nag your customer. That’s a terrible experience.”

Gendered News
From entertainment to finance to politics to sports, the Guardian Datablog explores how women and men are published in leading UK news sources, and how often articles by gender are shared across social networks.
In the interactive they’ve produced, you can sort across different criteria as well as drill deeper into specific publications and their sections.
At a macro level, UK news publishing is much like what we see in the United States: it’s dominated by men with less than 30% of news articles published by women across the Daily Mail, Telegraph and Guardian.
Drill down a bit, or look at gender participation by subject area, and you see women dominating topics like “lifestyle” and “entertainment” and men dominating, well, most everything else.
But the Datablog isn’t just looking at who gets published, but who gets heard.
You would think it’s one and the same but with the decline of the newspaper front page — and the Web site home page — as a conversation driver, it’s the social ecosystem of readers and their sharing habits that drives audience engagement and interaction.
Via the Guardian:

Online, who gets heard is determined by an ecosystem of actors: individuals sharing on Facebook and Twitter, link-sharing communities, personal algorithms on Google News, and citizen media curators. Newspapers only offer part of the information supply; we readers decide who’s heard every time we click, share or use our own voice…
…Of course, the reach of an article is much more complicated than likes and shares. What gets seen is often dependent on the time of day and the influence of who shares a link.
The definition of likes and shares also changes. Since our measurements in early August, Facebook’s counters have been changed to track links sent within private messages. This year, newsrooms experimented with Facebook social readers and tablet apps to grow their audiences. Bernhard Rieder’s network diagram of the Guardian’s Facebook page illustrates yet another social channel for news. Publishers sometimes can’t agree on what their own data means.
Despite these limitations, data on likes and shares offer the best outside picture of audience interest in women’s writing in the news.

Read through for analysis and more about the methodology and tools used to suss out the data. As usual, the Guardian also lets you download the data so you can work with it yourself.
Image: Screenshot, UK News Gender Ranking: What They Publish vs What Readers Share, via The Guardian. Select to embiggen.

Gendered News

From entertainment to finance to politics to sports, the Guardian Datablog explores how women and men are published in leading UK news sources, and how often articles by gender are shared across social networks.

In the interactive they’ve produced, you can sort across different criteria as well as drill deeper into specific publications and their sections.

At a macro level, UK news publishing is much like what we see in the United States: it’s dominated by men with less than 30% of news articles published by women across the Daily Mail, Telegraph and Guardian.

Drill down a bit, or look at gender participation by subject area, and you see women dominating topics like “lifestyle” and “entertainment” and men dominating, well, most everything else.

But the Datablog isn’t just looking at who gets published, but who gets heard.

You would think it’s one and the same but with the decline of the newspaper front page — and the Web site home page — as a conversation driver, it’s the social ecosystem of readers and their sharing habits that drives audience engagement and interaction.

Via the Guardian:

Online, who gets heard is determined by an ecosystem of actors: individuals sharing on Facebook and Twitter, link-sharing communities, personal algorithms on Google News, and citizen media curators. Newspapers only offer part of the information supply; we readers decide who’s heard every time we click, share or use our own voice…

…Of course, the reach of an article is much more complicated than likes and shares. What gets seen is often dependent on the time of day and the influence of who shares a link.

The definition of likes and shares also changes. Since our measurements in early August, Facebook’s counters have been changed to track links sent within private messages. This year, newsrooms experimented with Facebook social readers and tablet apps to grow their audiences. Bernhard Rieder’s network diagram of the Guardian’s Facebook page illustrates yet another social channel for news. Publishers sometimes can’t agree on what their own data means.

Despite these limitations, data on likes and shares offer the best outside picture of audience interest in women’s writing in the news.

Read through for analysis and more about the methodology and tools used to suss out the data. As usual, the Guardian also lets you download the data so you can work with it yourself.

Image: Screenshot, UK News Gender Ranking: What They Publish vs What Readers Share, via The Guardian. Select to embiggen.

The Reader as Assignment Editor
Slate’s asking readers to pitch the stories they’d like to see its reporters tackle. The site’s taking 150 word submissions for the next week and then will have the community vote on the stories they want written.

The Reader as Assignment Editor

Slate’s asking readers to pitch the stories they’d like to see its reporters tackle. The site’s taking 150 word submissions for the next week and then will have the community vote on the stories they want written.

The Original Reader Comment →

We often think reader comments are part and parcel of the contemporary Web, complete with inane commentary and flame wars. 

Or, for the historically minded, we talk about how they’re extensions of letters to the editor.

Not necessarily so. As Alfred Hermida notes:

Comments on stories have become a familiar feature on news websites. But the idea of leaving a space for readers to “have their say” is hundreds of years old.

Early newspapers in eighteenth-century England left blank spaces where readers could add their observations, complete with spelling mistakes, erroneous facts and inane comments, before passing it on to friends or family.

These early experiments in audience contributions were phased out, as newspapers became professional products authored by journalists. Participation became more formal and rigid through channels such as letters to the editor.

Hundreds of years later, spaces for readers to add their thoughts have re-emerged on news websites as one of a myriad of ways for the audience to participate and interact with the news.

Interesting: we barely posted anything yesterday and people spent more time on the FJP than any other day of the month.
Maybe not publishing should be our new engagement strategy.

Interesting: we barely posted anything yesterday and people spent more time on the FJP than any other day of the month.

Maybe not publishing should be our new engagement strategy.

Yahoo! researcher Yury Lifshits studied the Facebook “like” counts of the world’s top 45 news sources over a three month time period in order to see how they’re performing in terms of social engagement with their users.

Via Ediscope:

There are around 10 likes per 1000 pageviews (across several websites with public PV numbers). Decay of engagement is extremely sharp, with less than 20% likes happening after the first 24 hours…

..Stories about Facebook, Apple, Verizon, Groupon, future and infographics are universally popular across technology blogs. Articles about Microsoft, Amazon, Samsung, cloud computing, TV and search see much less engagement.

An interesting — and in our view positive —note comes at the beginning of the screencast. It’s not the frequency of publication that garners “likes”. Instead, it’s the quality of the piece.

Unfortunately, as noted, news stories appear to be highly disposable, basically drifting off into the digital ether after the first 24 hours:

 Yahoo! News has the sharpest decay of user interest. Engadget articles have the longest lifespan. But even in this case, new content is only visible for 3 or 4 days.

Here are some tips Yury gives for engaging your audience:

  • Put significant effort in your top stories
  • Improve promotion of your best content
  • Improve your median story
  • Use both intuition and algorithms for demand analysis
  • Invest in social media optimization

Visit Ediscope for details on each of the above.

Run Time: 4:52.

Finding the Sweet Spot for Journalism and Social Media →

Via AdAge. Raises interesting questions and potential solutions:

The country’s biggest newspapers are taking different tacks on social media.

The New York Times recently dissolved its social media editor post after less than two years, while USA Today simultaneously appointed its first social media editor and The Wall Street Journal continues to plug ahead with an outreach editor who’s been in place for a year.

All three are trying to answer the same questions facing newsrooms everywhere: Should social media belong to a designated editor, to the whole staff or both? Is a staff evangelist for social media ever finished with her work? And what happens when the next big thing bubbles up?