Posts tagged with ‘australia’

How “no worries” infected American English →

In modern times where “I’m good” means “No thank you” and “No worries” means “You’re welcome,” it’s interesting to know the root of this trend in language. 

 

Love is Not A Crime
The News, Part 01: India’s Supreme Court upholds a 153-year-old law criminalizing “gay sex” and overturns a four-year-old ruling that recognized same-sex relationships.
The News, Part 02: The UN says that the ruling violates international law and asks India to reconsider.
The News, Part 03: Australia’s High Court overturned legislation allowing gay marriage. Twenty-seven previously married couples will have their unions annulled.  
Image: A human rights activist protests in India, as shown on the front page of The Guardian, newspaper edition.

Love is Not A Crime

The News, Part 01: India’s Supreme Court upholds a 153-year-old law criminalizing “gay sex” and overturns a four-year-old ruling that recognized same-sex relationships.

The News, Part 02: The UN says that the ruling violates international law and asks India to reconsider.

The News, Part 03: Australia’s High Court overturned legislation allowing gay marriage. Twenty-seven previously married couples will have their unions annulled.  

Image: A human rights activist protests in India, as shown on the front page of The Guardian, newspaper edition.

Australia Adds New Weather Map Colors to Accommodate Extreme Heat
With temperatures reaching near-record levels and forest fires raging, Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology has added pink and deep purple to its heat index to extend its temperature range past 50 degrees celsius (122 fahrenheit).
Via The Sydney Morning Herald:



The range now extends to 54 degrees [129.2 fahrenheit] – well above the all-time record temperature of 50.7 degrees reached on January 2, 1960 at Oodnadatta Airport in South Australia – and, perhaps worringly, the forecast outlook is starting to deploy the new colours.
"The scale has just been increased today and I would anticipate it is because the forecast coming from the bureau’s model is showing temperatures in excess of 50 degrees," David Jones, head of the bureau’s climate monitoring and prediction unit, said.
While recent days have seen Australian temperature maps displaying maximums ranging from 40 degrees to 48 degrees - depicted in the colour scheme as burnt orange to black – both Sunday and Monday are now showing regions likely to hit 50 degrees or more, coloured purple.



As the SMH points out: “Australia’s first six days of 2013 were all among the hottest 20 days on record in terms of average maximums, with January 7 and today likely to add to the list of peaks. That would make it four of the top 10 in a little over a week.”
Meantime, there’s rash of wildfires breaking out (map) with some small towns being “warned that it is too late to try to flee the incoming flames,”  according to the Telegraph. In 2009, 173 people in Australia died during one particular period of wildfires.
In the United States, 2012 was the hottest year on record, breaking the previous yearly high by 1 degree fahrenheit, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
Image: Screenshot, Australian Bureau of Meteorology interactive weather map. Select to embiggen.

Australia Adds New Weather Map Colors to Accommodate Extreme Heat

With temperatures reaching near-record levels and forest fires raging, Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology has added pink and deep purple to its heat index to extend its temperature range past 50 degrees celsius (122 fahrenheit).

Via The Sydney Morning Herald:

The range now extends to 54 degrees [129.2 fahrenheit] – well above the all-time record temperature of 50.7 degrees reached on January 2, 1960 at Oodnadatta Airport in South Australia – and, perhaps worringly, the forecast outlook is starting to deploy the new colours.

"The scale has just been increased today and I would anticipate it is because the forecast coming from the bureau’s model is showing temperatures in excess of 50 degrees," David Jones, head of the bureau’s climate monitoring and prediction unit, said.

While recent days have seen Australian temperature maps displaying maximums ranging from 40 degrees to 48 degrees - depicted in the colour scheme as burnt orange to black – both Sunday and Monday are now showing regions likely to hit 50 degrees or more, coloured purple.

As the SMH points out: “Australia’s first six days of 2013 were all among the hottest 20 days on record in terms of average maximums, with January 7 and today likely to add to the list of peaks. That would make it four of the top 10 in a little over a week.”

Meantime, there’s rash of wildfires breaking out (map) with some small towns being “warned that it is too late to try to flee the incoming flames,” according to the Telegraph. In 2009, 173 people in Australia died during one particular period of wildfires.

In the United States, 2012 was the hottest year on record, breaking the previous yearly high by 1 degree fahrenheit, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Image: Screenshot, Australian Bureau of Meteorology interactive weather map. Select to embiggen.

Dark Webs Are Scary
Australia’s Sydney Morning Herald recently published an article about the Internet’s underbelly. This is where creepy people creep and the article explores how law enforcement officials and politicians are trying to figure out how to make sure they have complete access to this anonymous, online world.
The article’s lede would make for a great opening to a summertime blockbuster so let’s cue the spooky music and jump right in:

It’s called the Dark Web and once you are in you can buy people, drugs, guns and even have someone killed. The problem is: what can law enforcers do about it?
Deep in cyberspace is a web of private networks hosting sites that Google will never find and videos that YouTube will never play. Within this web, drugs and guns are bought and sold, hitmen advertise their services, hackers can be hired to attack an enemy’s computer and pornographic images to satisfy the most depraved tastes can be downloaded.
It is a place where freedom of speech is absolute and unconstrained. It is the Dark Web, the parallel internet that can be found only through encrypted private networks, unknown by many and accessed by few.

With an opening like this the article quickly moves to Australian efforts to pass laws that “could lead to the web history of any device connected to the internet being logged and retained for up to two years for law enforcement purposes.”
Not that that would really help since the whole point of these anonymizing networks is that those accessing them don’t leave a trace.
But efforts are made, and will continue to be made, in Australia and elsewhere, to ensure that government and authority can always stay “one step ahead of terrorists and organised criminals who threaten our national security.” Politically, that’s always the thing to say. Either right before or right after, we’re doing it for the children.
In the United States we have the same thing happening with an acronym stew of CISPA and SOPA and PIPA all proposed to fight the terrorists and pirates by monitoring the actions of anyone and everyone under very vague (and very few) conditions.
Add to that the recently proposed Lieberman-Collins Cybersecurity Act and we’re looking at a future where government tracks and stores the whole of our electronic communications, from phone calls to emails to credit card purchases.
The infrastructure to do so is expanding. A March cover story in Wired reports on a new data center being built in Utah. Its purpose is to suck down the world’s communication flow which, the article notes, the US can now do to the tune of 20 terabytes of information per second.

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails — parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration — an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans’ privacy.

And all this isn’t even considering truly authoritarian states that will, no doubt, be downstream beneficiaries of both the “moral cover” of Western laws and the monitoring technologies being developed. After all, it’s no secret that Western surveillance companies already sell their wares to repressive regimes.
Inflammatory media coverage about online bogeymen aside, how surveillance, privacy and anonymity issues play out over the next few years will shape how our societies operate.
As former NSA code breaker, and current NSA whistleblower William Binney says with his thumb and forefinger drawn together about the expanding surveillance state in the Wired article noted above, “We are, like, that far from a turnkey totalitarian state.”
Journalists have a crucial role to play in how all this plays out.
First is basic education on how digital communications actually work. Second is understanding how legislation like we’ve seen over the past year affects privacy and civil liberties. Third is listening with great skepticism to claims that either a) law abiding citizens have nothing to worry about, b) there will be protections in place and c) we’re only fighting the bad guys; surveillance always expands and our networks and digital communications provide the greatest target any government could ever want or has ever had. And fourth, journalists need to understand the value, rationale and importance that privacy and anonymity have in a functioning democratic society.
The Dark Web is certainly a scary place. But proposed government laws to monitor it — and the rest of us while doing so — are even scarier. — Michael
Image: Scared Kitteh. Original source unknown. Edited by the FJP.

Dark Webs Are Scary

Australia’s Sydney Morning Herald recently published an article about the Internet’s underbelly. This is where creepy people creep and the article explores how law enforcement officials and politicians are trying to figure out how to make sure they have complete access to this anonymous, online world.

The article’s lede would make for a great opening to a summertime blockbuster so let’s cue the spooky music and jump right in:

It’s called the Dark Web and once you are in you can buy people, drugs, guns and even have someone killed. The problem is: what can law enforcers do about it?

Deep in cyberspace is a web of private networks hosting sites that Google will never find and videos that YouTube will never play. Within this web, drugs and guns are bought and sold, hitmen advertise their services, hackers can be hired to attack an enemy’s computer and pornographic images to satisfy the most depraved tastes can be downloaded.

It is a place where freedom of speech is absolute and unconstrained. It is the Dark Web, the parallel internet that can be found only through encrypted private networks, unknown by many and accessed by few.

With an opening like this the article quickly moves to Australian efforts to pass laws that “could lead to the web history of any device connected to the internet being logged and retained for up to two years for law enforcement purposes.”

Not that that would really help since the whole point of these anonymizing networks is that those accessing them don’t leave a trace.

But efforts are made, and will continue to be made, in Australia and elsewhere, to ensure that government and authority can always stay “one step ahead of terrorists and organised criminals who threaten our national security.” Politically, that’s always the thing to say. Either right before or right after, we’re doing it for the children.

In the United States we have the same thing happening with an acronym stew of CISPA and SOPA and PIPA all proposed to fight the terrorists and pirates by monitoring the actions of anyone and everyone under very vague (and very few) conditions.

Add to that the recently proposed Lieberman-Collins Cybersecurity Act and we’re looking at a future where government tracks and stores the whole of our electronic communications, from phone calls to emails to credit card purchases.

The infrastructure to do so is expanding. A March cover story in Wired reports on a new data center being built in Utah. Its purpose is to suck down the world’s communication flow which, the article notes, the US can now do to the tune of 20 terabytes of information per second.

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails — parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration — an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans’ privacy.

And all this isn’t even considering truly authoritarian states that will, no doubt, be downstream beneficiaries of both the “moral cover” of Western laws and the monitoring technologies being developed. After all, it’s no secret that Western surveillance companies already sell their wares to repressive regimes.

Inflammatory media coverage about online bogeymen aside, how surveillance, privacy and anonymity issues play out over the next few years will shape how our societies operate.

As former NSA code breaker, and current NSA whistleblower William Binney says with his thumb and forefinger drawn together about the expanding surveillance state in the Wired article noted above, “We are, like, that far from a turnkey totalitarian state.”

Journalists have a crucial role to play in how all this plays out.

First is basic education on how digital communications actually work. Second is understanding how legislation like we’ve seen over the past year affects privacy and civil liberties. Third is listening with great skepticism to claims that either a) law abiding citizens have nothing to worry about, b) there will be protections in place and c) we’re only fighting the bad guys; surveillance always expands and our networks and digital communications provide the greatest target any government could ever want or has ever had. And fourth, journalists need to understand the value, rationale and importance that privacy and anonymity have in a functioning democratic society.

The Dark Web is certainly a scary place. But proposed government laws to monitor it — and the rest of us while doing so — are even scarier. — Michael

Image: Scared Kitteh. Original source unknown. Edited by the FJP.

reuters:

Pressure is building in Britain and Australia for fresh probes into Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, already under siege over phone-hacking claims, after allegations that it ran a secret unit that promoted pirating of pay-TV rivals.
The Australian Financial Review on Wednesday alleged that News Corp had used a special unit, Operational Security, set up in the mid-1990s, to sabotage its competitors, reinforcing claims in a BBC Panorama documentary aired earlier this week.
“These are serious allegations, and any allegations of criminal activity should be referred to the AFP (Australian Federal police) for investigation,” a spokeswoman for Australian Communications Minister Stephen Conroy told Reuters.
READ MORE: TV piracy claims put more pressure on Murdoch’s empire

FJP: Just finished reading the BBC’s take on this here. — Michael

reuters:

Pressure is building in Britain and Australia for fresh probes into Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, already under siege over phone-hacking claims, after allegations that it ran a secret unit that promoted pirating of pay-TV rivals.

The Australian Financial Review on Wednesday alleged that News Corp had used a special unit, Operational Security, set up in the mid-1990s, to sabotage its competitors, reinforcing claims in a BBC Panorama documentary aired earlier this week.

“These are serious allegations, and any allegations of criminal activity should be referred to the AFP (Australian Federal police) for investigation,” a spokeswoman for Australian Communications Minister Stephen Conroy told Reuters.

FJP: Just finished reading the BBC’s take on this here. — Michael

From Sound Bites to Context, Australian Start-Up Signs Up Academics to Add Depth to the News →

Australian start-up The Conversation is bringing on academics to contextualize news stories by adding depth, background and analysis to the day’s events.

Take, for example, yesterday’s Taliban attack on Kabul’s Intercontinental Hotel. Today there’s commentary from a lecturer in Middle East Studies at Deakin University aptly titled, Afghanistan: what the Hotel Intercontinental attack means.

The idea here is move beyond having a few quotes from experts on a topic, to having experts write about the topics themselves.

Via Nieman Labs:

While the site uses professional journalists as its editors, it uses academics to provide the content for the site. The goal, says the site’s charter, is to provide “a fact-based and editorially-independent forum” that will “unlock the knowledge and expertise of researchers and academics to provide the public with clarity and insight into society’s biggest problems” and “give experts a greater voice in shaping scientific, cultural and intellectual agendas by providing a trusted platform that values and promotes new thinking and evidence-based research.”

The academics are unpaid but have an interesting motivator: part of Australia’s approach to university promotion is how well and how often academics engage the public with their work. The Conversation gives them a platform to do just that and delivers metrics back to contributors (think: pages views, retweets, etc.) so they can quantify their impact.

So, this journalist tells a joke to the Dalai Lama…

(Source: languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu)