Posts tagged awards

Space is a Beautiful Place

The Royal Greenwich Observatory announced the finalists for its sixth annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. Here are a few that made the cut. Winners will be announced in September.

01: Ivan Eder (top)
Royal Observatory… says: Situated 7500 light years away in the ‘W’-shaped constellation of Cassiopeia, the Heart Nebula is a vast region of glowing gas, energized by a cluster of young stars at its centre. The image depicts the central region, where dust clouds are being eroded and moulded into rugged shapes by the searing cosmic radiation.

02: Anneliese Possberg
Royal Observatory… says: The spectacular Northern Lights pictured unfolding over a fjord, in Skjervøy, Troms, Norway. The vibrant colours are produced at various altitudes by different atmospheric gases, with blue light emitted by nitrogen and green by oxygen. Red light can be produced by both gases, while purples, pinks and yellows occur where the various colours mix and intersect.

03: Mark Hanson
Royal Observatory… says: This colourful starscape taken from Rancho Hidalgo, New Mexico, USA reveals the searing heat of the Crescent Nebula glowing in a whirl of red and blue. The emission nebula is a colossal shell of material ejected from a powerful but short-lived Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136), seen close to the image centre. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar wind now heats the swelling cloud, causing it to glow.

Want More?
Photos for the RGO competition are on Flickr. You can view the 14 finalists here. You can view the 2,500 or so submissions here.

Images: Select to embiggen.

The 2013 Utne Media Awards
About the contest:

2013 marks a new chapter in the 24-year history of the Utne Readerstaff recognizing and celebrating the best of what we read. Formerly called the Utne Independent Press Awards, we’ve decided to contemporize the name and call them the Utne Media Awards.
Considering the wealth of amazing new ideas, exceptional writing, and outstanding journalism taking place on the internet, we think it’s time the name of the award encompass every form of mass communication we come across each day from longform print journalism to video blogs. While we still love and will always celebrate the printed word, we’d be remiss not to recognize the democratization of information made possible by the internet. We think emphasizing the broad term “media” allows us to appropriately consider and recognize all of the ways people communicate with one another in the 21st century.

The winners are: 
YES! Magazine for General Excellence
The New Inquiry for Best Writing
Tom Dispatch for Best Political Coverage
Colossal for Best Arts Coverage
Guernica for Best Social/Cultural Coverage
New Internationalist for Best International Coverage
High Country News for Best Environmental Coverage
Tricycle for Best Body/Spirit Coverage
Scientific American for Best Science/Technology Coverage
See here for descriptions of the winners.
See here for the full list of nominees.
FJP: An interesting mix. Agree/Disagree or have some favorites of your own in any category? Let us know.

The 2013 Utne Media Awards

About the contest:

2013 marks a new chapter in the 24-year history of the Utne Readerstaff recognizing and celebrating the best of what we read. Formerly called the Utne Independent Press Awards, we’ve decided to contemporize the name and call them the Utne Media Awards.

Considering the wealth of amazing new ideas, exceptional writing, and outstanding journalism taking place on the internet, we think it’s time the name of the award encompass every form of mass communication we come across each day from longform print journalism to video blogs. While we still love and will always celebrate the printed word, we’d be remiss not to recognize the democratization of information made possible by the internet. We think emphasizing the broad term “media” allows us to appropriately consider and recognize all of the ways people communicate with one another in the 21st century.

The winners are: 

  • YES! Magazine for General Excellence
  • The New Inquiry for Best Writing
  • Tom Dispatch for Best Political Coverage
  • Colossal for Best Arts Coverage
  • Guernica for Best Social/Cultural Coverage
  • New Internationalist for Best International Coverage
  • High Country News for Best Environmental Coverage
  • Tricycle for Best Body/Spirit Coverage
  • Scientific American for Best Science/Technology Coverage

See here for descriptions of the winners.

See here for the full list of nominees.

FJP: An interesting mix. Agree/Disagree or have some favorites of your own in any category? Let us know.

Sony 2013 World Photography Winners

Top: Jens Juul, winner, Professional Portraiture, for Six Degress of Copenhagen.

Left: Andrea Gjestvang, Grand Prize winner, for One Day in History, portraits of survivors of the 2011 massacre in Utoeya, Norway.

Right: Valerio Bispuri, winner, Contemporary Issues, for Prisons of South America.

Select any to embiggen.

Winners across all categories along with photo galleries of their can be viewed at the World Photography Organization’s web site.

Univisión takes home an IRE award

fjp-latinamerica:

Univisión, the US Spanish-speaking broadcasting company, recently won an IRE award in the Broadcast Video category for their in-depth investigation on the Fast and Furious scandal, carried out by journalists Gerardo Reyes, Tomás Ocaña, Mariana Atencio, María Antonieta Collins, Tifani Roberts, Vytenis Didziulis, Margarita Rabin. 

After giving the award, the IRE judges had this to say:

In a yearlong investigation, hundreds of classified Mexican documents were obtained with great difficulty under the Mexican public access law. A database of 60,000 entries was combined with US government documents to find 57 previously unreported lost weapons under the “Fast and Furious” program and to show the depth in human cost.

Univision detailed previously unknown crimes committed with those weapons - including the shooting of 14 teens at a birthday party – and uncovered similar U.S. programs in Colombia, Honduras and Puerto Rico that also went awry.

As a result of Univision’s diligence, the Mexican Congress asked for economic compensation for the victims of massacres in which guns from the “Fast and Furious” operation were used.

A public debate erupted in Mexico on how much the Mexican government knew. Congress pressed the U.S. Justice Department for more information, and one U..S Congressman called “Rápido y Furioso” the “Holy Grail” that broke the case.

And this is a fragment of Univisión’s original submission:

Although the hundreds of classified us and Mexican government documents weren’t obtained through a FOI request, we believe our process of gathering and comparing comprehensive information from two different governments, resulted in a story that did “open records and open government” in a unique and revealing way that could not be achieved by simply filing a FOI request.

Bonus: The eight-country collaborative investigative effort Plunder in the Pacific was a runner-up in the Multiplatform category, after revealing how Asian, European and Latin American fleets have devastated what was once one of the world’s great fish stocks (jack mackerel). The project was led by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, in synergy with Latin American journalists from IDL-Reporteros (Perú) and CIPER (Chile).

Video: Courtesy of Univisión’s news show Aquí y Ahora

Jailed But Not Forgotten
Reeyot Alemu, an Ethiopian journalist currently serving a five-year prison term for her work reporting on banned opposition groups, just won the 2013 UNESCO-Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize.

Alemu was originally arrested with others for “lending support to an underground network of banned opposition groups, which has been criminalized under the country’s 2009 antiterrorism law.” Among the evidence used against her and her colleagues were some 25 articles they’d published in the Ethiopian Review.
In January 2012, Elias Kifle, the publication’s Washington, DC-based editor, was given a life sentence in absentia.

In a letter to Ethiopia’s Minister of Justice earlier this month, the Committee to Protect Jouranlists’ Joel Simon wrote:

Prison authorities have threatened Reeyot with solitary confinement for two months as punishment for alleged bad behavior toward them and threatening to publicize human rights violations by prison guards, according to sources close to the journalist who spoke to the International Women’s Media Foundation on condition of anonymity. CPJ has independently verified the information. Reeyot has also been denied access to adequate medical treatment after she was diagnosed with a tumor in her breast, the sources said…
…All of the charges against Reeyot were based on her journalistic activities—emails she had received from pro-opposition discussion groups and reports and photographs she had sent to opposition news sites. Reeyot, who received the International Women’s Media Foundation Courage in Journalism Award in 2012, has covered key developmental issues in Ethiopia such as poverty, democratic opposition, and gender equality.

In 2011, The CJP reported that 79 Ethiopian journalists were in exile. The ruling party, which controls 546 of the 547 seats in parliament has passed laws over the last five years restricting independent media, political opposition groups and civil society organizations.
Image: Reeyot Alemu, via the IWMF.

Jailed But Not Forgotten

Reeyot Alemu, an Ethiopian journalist currently serving a five-year prison term for her work reporting on banned opposition groups, just won the 2013 UNESCO-Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize.

Alemu was originally arrested with others for “lending support to an underground network of banned opposition groups, which has been criminalized under the country’s 2009 antiterrorism law.” Among the evidence used against her and her colleagues were some 25 articles they’d published in the Ethiopian Review.

In January 2012, Elias Kifle, the publication’s Washington, DC-based editor, was given a life sentence in absentia.

In a letter to Ethiopia’s Minister of Justice earlier this month, the Committee to Protect Jouranlists’ Joel Simon wrote:

Prison authorities have threatened Reeyot with solitary confinement for two months as punishment for alleged bad behavior toward them and threatening to publicize human rights violations by prison guards, according to sources close to the journalist who spoke to the International Women’s Media Foundation on condition of anonymity. CPJ has independently verified the information. Reeyot has also been denied access to adequate medical treatment after she was diagnosed with a tumor in her breast, the sources said…

…All of the charges against Reeyot were based on her journalistic activities—emails she had received from pro-opposition discussion groups and reports and photographs she had sent to opposition news sites. Reeyot, who received the International Women’s Media Foundation Courage in Journalism Award in 2012, has covered key developmental issues in Ethiopia such as poverty, democratic opposition, and gender equality.

In 2011, The CJP reported that 79 Ethiopian journalists were in exile. The ruling party, which controls 546 of the 547 seats in parliament has passed laws over the last five years restricting independent media, political opposition groups and civil society organizations.

Image: Reeyot Alemu, via the IWMF.

Where to Start as a Journalist? Try the Peabody Awards

I’m graduating in May in hopes of becoming a journalist. I’ve had internships and I’ve worked for my university’s online news source. Can you steer a terrified senior in a direction? Where should I look? What should I be looking for? What should I work on?” — Helena

We get questions like this fairly frequently and there’s no exact answer. But with yesterday’s announcement of the 2012 Peabody Award winners we’re seeing the incredible range of today’s journalism.This isn’t to say that you can’t quibble with this story winning over that story, or say they could chose more innovative work, but it is to say that if you look at the winners from the Web, radio, television and documentary you see a wild diversity of storytelling approaches and ideas.

And reviewing some of the winners, I think, is a great place to start.

Start with the Web and The New York Times win for “Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek,” a multimedia feature using aerial photography, video and words while taking advantage of contemporary presentation techniques such as responsive design and parallax in order to augment and further drive the story forward.

SCOTUSBlog is the other Web winner. There are no bells and whistles. Instead, it’s pretty much a text only blog that’s become a go to resource for stories, background and explainers on all things that have to do with the US Supreme Court. Here, deep, thorough, consistent reporting and analysis wins out.

Radio, I think, is in a golden age and the reason I think this is is because of the launch of iTunes back in 2001. This allowed people to easily subscribe to podcasts — and by extension radio programming — that we previously didn’t have access to. Yes, RSS already existed but iTunes gave us an easy interface to either hear or distribute programming. While your local public radio station might not carry it, you can now hear everything from the BBC’s From Our Own Correspondent to The Moth Radio Hour, 99% Invisible and Radiolab among a host of other exceptional programming.

Each of these programs uses different techniques and styles. By listening and analyzing, we learn new tricks that expand our understanding of what’s possible in audio storytelling.

One of this year’s radio winners comes from Radio Diaries, is called “Teen Contender" and follows the 16-year-old Olympic boxer Claressa Shields in a first person narrative from Flint, Michigan to London. Here’s a great breakdown by Julia Barton on the techniques used and how this created great radio.

Other radio winners include WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show, a “traditional” hosted show about New York’s political and cultural life; This American Life’s “What Happened at Dos Erres,” an incredible radio documentary about a Guatemalan immigrant in Boston “who learns that the man he believed to be his father actually led the massacre of his village”; and NPR for its hard news reporting in Syria by Kelly McEvers and Deborah Amos.

I’ll leave it at this and with the recommendation to explore different types of journalism awards across magazines, multimedia, photography, documentary, radio and the rest. Through it, you’ll come across work that brings about an “Aha!” moment, one that makes you say, “This is what I want to do.” And then start positioning yourself and aiming towards doing it by applying for work — or learning the skills needed to apply for work — in that area.

Hope this helps. — Michael

Have a question? Ask away.

YouTube Wins News Innovation Award

Via VentureBeat:

YouTube won a News Innovation Award from the International Center for Journalists last night. Ironically, that’s just a day before the Israeli army used the service, along with Twitter and its own blog, to almost livecast the assassination of a Hamas leader.

YouTube has become a massive news destination, YouTube chief executive Salar Kamangar said in his acceptance speech, with 7000 hours of news-related footage uploaded every single day. Fully a third of searches on YouTube are news-related, and after the March earthquake in Japan this year, the top 20 YouTube videos of the disaster were watched almost 100 million times.

I.F. Stone Award Open for Applications

The Investigative Fund is accepting applications for its fall 2012 I.F. Stone Award for emerging journalists.

Background:

Twice a year, in the fall and spring, The Investigative Fund will accept investigative proposals from young and emerging reporters, or reporting teams, and will select one or two I.F. Stone Award winners. Winners of the I.F. Stone Award will receive funding to cover the reporting costs of their project, up to a maximum of $10,000; editorial guidance from Investigative Fund editors; access to such subscription services as Nexis and Accurint; and assistance with placement of the investigation in a print, online, or broadcast outlet…

…With the I.F. Stone Award, The Investigative Fund will create a pathway for emerging journalists to publish or air their first or early-career investigations. We hope the award will not only cultivate diverse journalistic talent, but help ensure that investigative reporting continues to be responsive to a broad and eclectic audience.

Deadline for applications is November 30. Application and more information found here.

The Investigative Fund is a project of the Nation Institute.  

Today, on behalf of El Faro, I receive the Anna Politkovskaya award with great pride. However, I think that such recognition should also be given to other journalists in the Central American region who are going through really alarming situations.

Nowadays, 75% of murdered journalists do not die in war zones. Instead, they are being killed deliberately only to be silenced. In fact, Mexico and Honduras are the most dangerous countries in the world to practice journalism.

Recently, an NGO passed along a questionnaire to several local journalists in Mexico and asked what could international organizations do to support their work. Several responded that they wanted a firearm, and one of them explained: “I want a gun so they cannot catch me alive.”

Carlos Dada, the news director of Central American publication El Faro, in his acceptance speech (in Spanish) of the 2012 Anna Politkovskaya Award honoring courageous investigative reporting.

Background: Dada and his colleagues operate under constant and very real threats in one of the most hazardous regions of the world for independent journalists. El Faro was also awarded the 2012 WOLA Human Rights Award last month, and the Columbia School of Journalism’s Maria Moors Cabot Prize back in 2011.

(via fjp-latinamerica)

This honor is dedicated to the martyrs of the Syrian revolution, and to all those women who are working in silence, in particularly difficult circumstances inside Syria, and to those who move among the downpour of bullets and artillery fire, the tanks and the fighter jets, in order to carry on the revolution of the Syrian people toward establishing a free and democratic society.

Samar Yazbek, winner of the 2012 Pen Pinter International Writer of Courage prize, in her acceptance speech.

Yazbek’s memoir, A Woman in the Crossfire: Diaries of the Syrian Revolution, was released earlier this year and chronicles the Syrian civil war. She currently lives in exile in Paris.

Time Wins Magazine of the Year Award
Via AdAge:

Time was named magazine of the year at the annual National Magazine Awards on Thursday night, taking home a prize introduced in 2010 to honor brands that excel across both print and digital.
Vice magazine, which had celebrated its first nomination for a National Magazine Award with a press release thanking the industry for “realizing we do it better than you,” lost to Bloomberg Businessweek for general excellence among general-interest magazines.
It was Businessweek’s first win for general excellence since Bloomberg acquired the title in 2009.
Four magazines won their first-ever general excellence awards, which were the top prizes before the magazine of the year category was created: O, The Oprah Magazine, for general excellence among women’s magazines; Inc., for active- and special-interest magazines; House Beautiful, for lifestyle magazines; and IEEE Spectrum, for thought-leader magazines.

Congratulations to all. And hat tip to Vice for being clever.
Image: Assorted Time covers.

Time Wins Magazine of the Year Award

Via AdAge:

Time was named magazine of the year at the annual National Magazine Awards on Thursday night, taking home a prize introduced in 2010 to honor brands that excel across both print and digital.

Vice magazine, which had celebrated its first nomination for a National Magazine Award with a press release thanking the industry for “realizing we do it better than you,” lost to Bloomberg Businessweek for general excellence among general-interest magazines.

It was Businessweek’s first win for general excellence since Bloomberg acquired the title in 2009.

Four magazines won their first-ever general excellence awards, which were the top prizes before the magazine of the year category was created: O, The Oprah Magazine, for general excellence among women’s magazines; Inc., for active- and special-interest magazines; House Beautiful, for lifestyle magazines; and IEEE Spectrum, for thought-leader magazines.

Congratulations to all. And hat tip to Vice for being clever.

Image: Assorted Time covers.

Afrikaner Blood

Afrikaner Blood from Holland’s Elles van Gelderen and Ilvy Njiokiktjien has won the second annual World Press Photo Multimedia contest.

The documentary follows Afrikaner teenagers in South Africa as they attend a self-defense camp to learn how to defend themselves against the “black enemy.”

Via the British Journal of Photography:

Speaking to BJP ahead of the announcement, jury chair Vincent Laforet explains that the judges felt the winning work had “a squirm factor,” he says. “We were uncomfortable with the subject and what was being said. I, initially, had a negative reaction to it because I was so taken aback by, in effect, the power of the piece. But, when I saw it for the second time I realised that not only was it a very important piece, but also it was by far the single best produced piece in terms of nuance and restraint - they could absolutely have gone over the top, exaggerated things or make points a little bit more bluntly. Instead, there was a lot of subtlety. The piece was very well edited. It had a series of interviews prior to the indoctrination, and interviews after it.”

Run Time - 8:27

World Press Photo of the Year
Congratulations to Samuel Aranda for winning the 2011 World Press Photo of the Year.
Via World Press Photo

The picture shows a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011. Samuel Aranda was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times. He is represented by Corbis Images.

World Press Photo of the Year

Congratulations to Samuel Aranda for winning the 2011 World Press Photo of the Year.

Via World Press Photo

The picture shows a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011. Samuel Aranda was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times. He is represented by Corbis Images.

Reuters Columnist Named World Press Freedom Hero

Via the Associated Press/Boston Globe:

The International Press Institute named David Rohde this year’s World Press Freedom Hero on Tuesday, citing the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner’s work in Bosnia and Afghanistan in choosing him for the award.

The Reuters columnist and former New York Times journalist received his first Pulitzer in 1996 for reports in the Christian Science Monitor exposing the massacre of thousands of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica. That expose led to his arrest by Bosnian Serb police in 1995. He was detained for 10 days, initially in secret, and threatened with espionage charges.

He was again detained in 2008, for more than seven months by the Taliban in Afghanistan while he and two Afghan colleagues were researching the history of U.S. involvement in the country for a book.

Rhode shared a Pulitzer Prize with others in a New York Times team in April 2009 for the paper’s “masterful, groundbreaking coverage of America’s deepening military and political challenges in Afghanistan and Pakistan.”

The Wold Press Freedom Hero award, said an IPI statement, “recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution to defending and promoting press freedom, especially, but not only, if it involved acts of resistance or bravery under harsh conditions.”