Posts tagged with ‘blogging’

GigaOm’s Matthew Ingram writes about Tumblr’s explosive growth and notes that there are two key sets of users that have been coming on board the last number of months: teens and publishers. 
He wonders though whether Tumblr will be the next Facebook or MySpace:

All of this growth is wonderful for Tumblr, which was started by David Karp four years ago, when he was just 20 years old — but the big unanswered question is whether the network can actually bring in revenue to match that growth. Everyone wants to be the next Facebook, which many early observers doubted would ever find a way to make money and now brings in revenues estimated at $2 billion. But MySpace also grew to massive levels, with more than 76 million users at its peak, and was bought by News Corp. for $580 million, only to rapidly decline after it failed to figure out how to make money.

While comparisons are nice, we think it’s a bit apples and robots. Yes, Tumblr eventually needs to find a sustainable business model. But instead of looking to FB and MySpace, let’s watch Tumblr be the first Tumblr.
Image: Gabrie Coletti via Flickr/Creative Commons.

GigaOm’s Matthew Ingram writes about Tumblr’s explosive growth and notes that there are two key sets of users that have been coming on board the last number of months: teens and publishers. 

He wonders though whether Tumblr will be the next Facebook or MySpace:

All of this growth is wonderful for Tumblr, which was started by David Karp four years ago, when he was just 20 years old — but the big unanswered question is whether the network can actually bring in revenue to match that growth. Everyone wants to be the next Facebook, which many early observers doubted would ever find a way to make money and now brings in revenues estimated at $2 billion. But MySpace also grew to massive levels, with more than 76 million users at its peak, and was bought by News Corp. for $580 million, only to rapidly decline after it failed to figure out how to make money.

While comparisons are nice, we think it’s a bit apples and robots. Yes, Tumblr eventually needs to find a sustainable business model. But instead of looking to FB and MySpace, let’s watch Tumblr be the first Tumblr.

Image: Gabrie Coletti via Flickr/Creative Commons.

I’ve been writing a science blog called Not Exactly Rocket Science for 5 years. I’ve also been freelancing for magazines and newspapers for most of that time. I have variously called myself a science blogger, a science writer and a science journalist, and I know people who would disagree with the last of those. In five years, I have seen this “debate” about bloggers and journalists rear its head again and again. Do bloggers “count” as journalists? Are blogs journalism? And I’ve come to realise that this debate is exactly like the film Titanic: it is tedious, it goes on forever, everyone’s a caricature and they’re stuck on a massive sinking ship

…Here, I find it helpful to think of modern journalism in terms of mental disorders. The field of mental health is moving away from sharply defined diagnoses to spectrums of behaviours. In a similar way, there is a spectrum of journalistic values, norms and techniques, which are present to different extents in different people or even individual pieces of work.

I know I fall somewhere on that spectrum. Am I a journalist? Honestly, I care less about the answer than I once did. I am not being blase – I care very deeply about journalism, but there are few things more boring than journalists arguing over what counts as journalism. We live in a world full of stories, about amazing people doing amazing things and terrible people doing terrible things. I will use every medium I can to tell those stories. I will try to tell them accurately so people aren’t misled. I will try to tell them well so people will listen. If people want to argue about what to call that, that’s fine for them.

I would rather just do it.

— Ed Yong, Discover Magazine, Am I a science journalist?

Noted education blogger Will Richardson this week announced that after 10 years of blogging on his personal site, it’s time to pack it in. Kinda.
"More and more as I think about “curating” my learning world, I find myself wanting to stow all the good stuff in one place, all the blog posts, quotes, pictures, graphics, photos, bookmarks, videos and other snips that I find interesting," Richardson said." I know I could do that here. But here’s the other thing…I’m also in constant need of fresh voices an perspectives."
He’s setting up shop, instead, on Tumblr ( a move wholly endorsed by the team here at FJP).
However, the change of venue has elicited mixed reactions from the education blogging crowd, who wonder what Richardson’s shift in publishing platforms means about communication writ large. Are we, as a society running out of patience for long form writing and its underlying thinking, in favor of quick-hit sharing platforms? Educational technology enthusiast Darren Draper said: 

I wonder how our increased tendency to share snippets of thought alongside snippets of 3rd-party content will continue to impact our level of truly deep thinking - presumably forced (or more openly embraced?) by the constraints of blogging as our once-preferred medium.As a society, if our move toward more convenient flow also translates into at least equal levels of shared deep thinking, then I’m all for it. If not, however, then the increased-ease-of-use for increased-shallow-thinking trade-off will be harmful in the long run.

So is Tumblr a happy medium of content sharing, or just a slide down the blogging value chain? And who says it has to be all or nothing? 
via Online Learning Daily

Noted education blogger Will Richardson this week announced that after 10 years of blogging on his personal site, it’s time to pack it in. Kinda.

"More and more as I think about “curating” my learning world, I find myself wanting to stow all the good stuff in one place, all the blog posts, quotes, pictures, graphics, photos, bookmarks, videos and other snips that I find interesting," Richardson said." I know I could do that here. But here’s the other thing…I’m also in constant need of fresh voices an perspectives."

He’s setting up shop, instead, on Tumblr ( a move wholly endorsed by the team here at FJP).

However, the change of venue has elicited mixed reactions from the education blogging crowd, who wonder what Richardson’s shift in publishing platforms means about communication writ large. Are we, as a society running out of patience for long form writing and its underlying thinking, in favor of quick-hit sharing platforms? Educational technology enthusiast Darren Draper said: 

I wonder how our increased tendency to share snippets of thought alongside snippets of 3rd-party content will continue to impact our level of truly deep thinking - presumably forced (or more openly embraced?) by the constraints of blogging as our once-preferred medium.

As a society, if our move toward more convenient flow also translates into at least equal levels of shared deep thinking, then I’m all for it. If not, however, then the increased-ease-of-use for increased-shallow-thinking trade-off will be harmful in the long run.

So is Tumblr a happy medium of content sharing, or just a slide down the blogging value chain? And who says it has to be all or nothing? 

via Online Learning Daily

Future Journalism Project

—005 - Get to Know a Tumblr with Ernie Smith

Get to Know a Tumblr — ShortFormBlog’s Ernie Smith

DC journalist Ernie Smith, a designer for the Washington Post Express, started ShortFormBlog during a bout of unemployment in January 2009. The experimental news site moved to Tumblr full-time earlier this year.

Besides Smith, ShortFormBlog’s two other writers are both based out of the Bay Area. Seth Millstein, who mostly focuses on political stories, has been with the site since August, and also runs a personal WordPress blog. Chris Tognotti, who’s been with SFB since January, also throws long-form posts at The Crater.

Other folks whose byline you might catch on SFB are Matthew Keys, aka ProducerMatthew, who contributes during breaking news stories, and intern Justin Jones. Jones (who runs Justin Reads The News on Tumblr) is a journalism student at the University of Florida, and Keys is that guy who knew that Donald Trump wasn’t running three weeks before everyone else.

 

How blogging gives student journalists an edge in the job market 
The growing list of student bloggers who have found their way into good ‘pro’ jobs also includes Hannah Waldram, who founded the Bournville Village blog, ended up taking to professional local blogging as the Cardiff ‘beatblogger‘ for The Guardian’s now mothballed Local project before becoming a community coordinator for the same newspaper, and Dave Lee, who founded The Linc newspaper and website in his university town of Lincoln before moving on to a varied career that currently sees him covering technology news for the BBC.

Via TNW 

 

How blogging gives student journalists an edge in the job market 

The growing list of student bloggers who have found their way into good ‘pro’ jobs also includes Hannah Waldram, who founded the Bournville Village blog, ended up taking to professional local blogging as the Cardiff ‘beatblogger‘ for The Guardian’s now mothballed Local project before becoming a community coordinator for the same newspaper, and Dave Lee, who founded The Linc newspaper and website in his university town of Lincoln before moving on to a varied career that currently sees him covering technology news for the BBC.

Via TNW 

The Copy Editor: Tumblr and link attribution →

world-shaker:

theatlantic:

wnyc:

motherjones:

kateoplis:

thepoliticalnotebook:

copyeditor:

I’m reading Anthony DeRosa’s post again on how some traditional media companies refuse to enter into the link economy.

The practice is also prevalent here in Tumblr, it seems.

Photos and articles are sometimes posted sans attribution or links to the sources. Other Tumblr users, meanwhile, delete the link pertaining to the original tumblelog that posted the material.

No. If it’s on the web, it’s not yours. You can’t pull out the fair-use-clause card if you don’t attribute or try to claim something that is not yours. Remember Krip?

Fellow Tumblrers: This is important.  I see this a lot, particularly when it comes to crediting photos.  The rule is, give as much credit as you know, and if you can’t find enough information to credit the photo, quote, or article, DON’T POST IT.  This isn’t something to be casual about.

This issue really bothers me. Yes, the photo posts are the majority of it but I see it happening in all kinds of posts: videos uploaded to Tumblr w/o links (Tumblr’s video upload is reserved for videos you’ve taken yourself, no?); text w/o block-quotes and sources, etc. It’s especially disheartening when it’s from “reputable” Tumblrs. 

From a Tumblr editor’s perspective, I cannot promote a post without proper link to the source, per Tumblr’s Editor Guidelines, and I refuse to reblog one based on the same criteria. Please take the extra minute and credit.

We (and a lot of our friends, big and small) have fallen short of these standards on some (recent!) occasions, and we’ve been fortunate enough to benefit from the patient instruction of a few standout wardens in the Tumblr community. So the only thing we’d add is: When somebody doesn’t attribute, call them on it! Chances are they’ll do the right thing.

Memo and great reminder to all WNYC Tumblr contributors! (A good post to “like” to keep handy for reference.) -L.A.

This is a great point, and one that should be made frequently. If we miss an attribution somewhere, please let us know. - J.K.

Great points all around, and an ideal to aspire to. But one important question:

Has someone sent this to 9gag?

FJP: And this is why everyone should study this image.

Via Pina Jane Bijkerk:

Giving Credit Where it's Due

The biggie version can be seen here.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

Egypt Sentences Blogger to 3 Years →

Via the New York Times:

An Egyptian blogger was sentenced Monday to three years in prison for criticizing the military in what human rights advocates called one of the more alarming violations of freedom of expression since a popular uprising led to the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak two months ago

The blogger, Maikel Nabil, 26, had assailed the Egyptian armed forces for what he called its continuation of the corruption and anti-democratic practices of Mr. Mubarak. Mr. Nabil often quoted from reports by established human rights groups.

I don’t think Tumblr is a journalistic platform. It’s perfect for blogging on the arts and being tightly-knit with the community, or introducing new songs from The Beastie Boys.

Kenna McHugh, Is the New York Times Tumblr Actual Journalism? [via Social Times]

Is blogging journalism? This is going to get ugly. 

(via copyeditor)

FJP: That’s like saying I don’t think a pen and a piece of paper is a journalistic platform. Someone’s mistaking the medium for the message.

(via copyeditor)

Anonymous asked: People are talking a lot about how blogging has impacted traditional journalism in terms of decaying readership in print media, greater immediacy and democracy in news and information available, etc.-- could you comment briefly on these changes, and also mention other effects blogging has had on traditional journalism that aren't as evident, and/or that we may not fully realize yet?

I think it comes back to the dissolution of the barrier to entry into any particular field or subject matter verticals. Once upon a time you had to pitch editors, send in clips and hop through hoops to get your story out there. Now, anyone can go to a Blogger or WordPress or Tumblr and take the 35 seconds or so it take to set up an account to start publishing.

Does that negate the need for traditional publishers? Not at all. But it adds legions of very smart people with very interesting things to say about all sorts of matters that otherwise would never have been heard.

It also adds legions of very unintelligent people with very uninteresting things to say about all sorts of matters but that’s a different point.

The best bloggers are those that are passionate and deeply knowledgeable about a given, discrete subject. These are people who write about things, investigate things and share there expertise about things.

If you take current events, you’ll find experts in Middle East and North African politics that can help us understand what’s happening in Libya, Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain, Yemen and elsewhere right now, experts in nuclear energy and nuclear reactors who can help us understand Japan right now, and the list goes on and on.

Unfortunately, “bloggers” are still stereotyped as the unwashed masses of online media. I think instead they should be thought of as the early warning systems of what’s happening around the world, and this is a system that traditional journalists need to learn to tap into and listen to. I’ve written about that here in reaction to  a lecture Rachel Sterne gave on citizen journalism to a class I teach at Columbia:

Bloggers and others who are conversing on social networks about subjects we care about are, after all, nothing more than our communities writ large. It is the role of the journalist to listen to, understand, and learn from the community, and take his or her reporting from there. — Michael

Note: This is an answer to a question from an email interview I gave for an article on Benzinga (registration required). I’ll be posting other answers from the interview in the upcoming days.

Traditional blog platforms are chiefly designed to do one thing—write a blog post, give it a title, add photos, multimedia, tags, etc., and then publish - and while they do it very well, it often means there’s a big barrier between thought and publication. The original idea behind Tumblr is drastically reduce that friction — you can just post a photo, if that’s all you want, or a video, or a snippet of text, etc.

Mark Coatney, Director/Media Evangelist, Tumblr.

Laura Hlebasko, Benzinga, Whither Journalism? The Present and Future State of the News.

FJP: Case in point.

What Say, Live Blogs?

The Guardian’s Matt Wells recently reported that live blogging accounts for 9% of the site’s total unique users. Whether the subject is sports, a speech or what’s happening on the ground in Libya, readers can’t get enough of up to the minute reporting on what’s happening right now.

Wells is generally a fan:

[Live blogs] provide a useful way of telling stories characterised by incremental developments and multiple layers. They are open about the limitations of journalism and draw in the expertise of the audience – and even take input from journalists on rival publications.

On fast-moving stories, live blogs give the ability to post significant developments quickly – more quickly than editing and re-editing a news article. They also allow us to link out to other coverage, to include comments from Twitter and Facebook, to display multimedia (pictures, video and audio), and to include our audience in the comments below the line – all in one place.

What about the cons?

Over on Editors Web Log Meghan Hartsell writes, “With a constant live feed, readers can get lost in the story.” With a series of bulleted facts and one liners, context and analysis are lost.

We might have instant access to the who, what, where and when, but we lose out on the ever important why.

Or, as John Graydon Symes colorfully explains the live blog:

There is no structure and therefore no sense, and the effect is of being in the middle of a room full of loud, shouty and excitable people all yelling at once with all the phones ringing, the fire alarm going off and a drunken old boy slurring in your ear about “what it all means.” It really is a bizarre way to run a media circus.

What thinks you? What place does the live blog have?

lemonturtles asked: I'm a student journalist,I write for my school's newspaper. But I have a question, since I am considered a child of the "digital age," is there a difference between a blogger and a journalist? Can a blogger be also considered a journalist?

Hi there,

Most definitely yes, a blogger can be a journalist and a journalist can be a blogger. It’s all a matter of style.

That’s my short answer. For a long answer I’m going to refer you to NYU’s Jay Rosen who give a talk on exactly this topic at SXSW.

Here’s his overview on bloggers versus journalists:

Six years ago I wrote an essay called Bloggers vs. Journalists is Over. It was my most well read piece at the time. And it made the points you would expect: This distinction is eroding. This war is absurd. Get over it. Move on. There’s bigger work to be done.

But since then I’ve noticed that while the division–-bloggers as one type, journalists as another–-makes less and less sense, the conflict continues to surface. Why? Well, something must be happening under the surface that expresses itself through bloggers vs. journalists. But what is that subterranean thing? This is my real subject today.

Here’s the audio from his talk

And here’s an article from the Guardian about the talk.

Hope this helps. We look forward to hearing from you again. — Michael

How Blogs are Changing Science →

Back in January the Guardian posted a great podcast about science, blogging and why scientists and science writers are blogging.

We missed it at the time but listened to it this morning. It’s a fascinating romp through through the topic and deserves a listen even if science isn’t your particular beat.

Run Time: 38:50

Source | Download

…in early February, the Senegalese-American immigrant — and his green card 9 years in the making — returned to Senegal to make some changes at Seneweb.com, his website and, in many ways, the unofficial homepage of the nation.

If you’re Senegalese or have ever traveled to the West African nation, you’ve likely come across this site. A buzzing, sensational aggregator of the former French colony’s news, it feels and looks like the Huffington Post of Senegal — except with far less in the way of competition. Deeply influential in Senegalese media and politics, it’s where obscure reports of government waywardness go viral. On a happening day, the site fetches 200,000 unique visits and 1.3 million hits — astounding numbers in a nation of 13 million, less than a million of whom can even get online.

The Coming Battle for Africa’s Internet, on what’s been called the Huffington Post of Senegal (via theatlantic)