posts about or somewhat related to ‘broadband’

Kansas City Gets Speedy

Google announced the launch of Google Fiber today with this clever promotional video. 

Google Fiber is an infrastructure initiative by the company which claims that — on average — it brings connection speeds 100 times faster than typical broadband access. Kansas City was chosen as its first rollout destination after a national search for the “best” community to develop it in.

Via Google:

Google Fiber is 100 times faster than today’s average broadband. No more buffering. No more loading. No more waiting. Gigabit speeds will get rid of these pesky, archaic problems and open up new opportunities for the web. Imagine: instantaneous sharing; truly global education; medical appointments with 3D imaging; even new industries that we haven’t even dreamed of, powered by a gig.

This doesn’t mean that residents have immediate access to Google Fiber. Instead, neighborhoods that reach a threshold of signups will be prioritized to receive it. 

The World’s Fastest Internet Cities
Each quarter, Akamai, one of the world’s largest content delivery networks, issues its State of the Internet Report. 
In this chart they look at the global average connection speed by city. South Korea, as usual, tops the list. Then its almost exclusively Japan — with the exception of Umea and Goteborg in Sweden — until we get out of the top 50.
Boston is the first US city to make the list, checking in at number 51 with an average speed of 8.4Mbps.
For those living in New Jersey, congratulations. North Bergen and Jersey City are the second and third fastest US cities (and 52nd and 58th fastest globally). 
The only other countries with cities in the top 100 are Latvia (Riga at 76), Australia (Canberra at 78), Canada (Victoria, BC at 81 and Oakville, ON at 97) and Romania (Timisoara at 89).
The speed differential within the global top 100 is immense. Global number one Taegu, South Korea (21.8 Mbps), for example, is more than three times faster than number 99 Hartford, CT (7.0 Mbps).
Akamai’s State of the Internet Report has some interactives where you can select metrics such as average speeds and broadband adoption against a global map. Not surprisingly, countries in the northern hemisphere perform much better than those in the south.
Image: Detail from the world’s fastest Internet cities from Akamai’s State of the Internet Report

The World’s Fastest Internet Cities

Each quarter, Akamai, one of the world’s largest content delivery networks, issues its State of the Internet Report

In this chart they look at the global average connection speed by city. South Korea, as usual, tops the list. Then its almost exclusively Japan — with the exception of Umea and Goteborg in Sweden — until we get out of the top 50.

Boston is the first US city to make the list, checking in at number 51 with an average speed of 8.4Mbps.

For those living in New Jersey, congratulations. North Bergen and Jersey City are the second and third fastest US cities (and 52nd and 58th fastest globally). 

The only other countries with cities in the top 100 are Latvia (Riga at 76), Australia (Canberra at 78), Canada (Victoria, BC at 81 and Oakville, ON at 97) and Romania (Timisoara at 89).

The speed differential within the global top 100 is immense. Global number one Taegu, South Korea (21.8 Mbps), for example, is more than three times faster than number 99 Hartford, CT (7.0 Mbps).

Akamai’s State of the Internet Report has some interactives where you can select metrics such as average speeds and broadband adoption against a global map. Not surprisingly, countries in the northern hemisphere perform much better than those in the south.

Image: Detail from the world’s fastest Internet cities from Akamai’s State of the Internet Report


Mapping Where Your Phone Won’t Work
The FCC created an interactive map highlighting areas in the United States that lack 3G mobile access. 
The regions are eligible for Mobility Fund Phase 1 support, a $300 million fund that carriers can apply for to bring wireless broadband to neglected areas. 
Via the FCC:

This map shows the areas preliminarily identified as potentially eligible for Mobility Fund Phase 1 support. These areas are US Census blocks that lack 3G or better mobile coverage at the centroid of the block according to October 2011 American Roamer data and contain road miles in any of nine road categories. Counties that contain any of these blocks are shaded light gray, and as you zoom in and mouse over these counties you will see more information on the potentially eligible blocks, including population, road miles (S1100, S1200, and S1400 categories only), and the name and number of the CMA in which the blocks are located. Further zooming in allows you to see the US Census tracts that contain these blocks.

Image: Screenshot of the FCC’s Mobility Fund Phase 1 Potentially Eligible Areas interactive map. Click through to explore.
H/T: GigaOm.

Mapping Where Your Phone Won’t Work

The FCC created an interactive map highlighting areas in the United States that lack 3G mobile access. 

The regions are eligible for Mobility Fund Phase 1 support, a $300 million fund that carriers can apply for to bring wireless broadband to neglected areas. 

Via the FCC:

This map shows the areas preliminarily identified as potentially eligible for Mobility Fund Phase 1 support. These areas are US Census blocks that lack 3G or better mobile coverage at the centroid of the block according to October 2011 American Roamer data and contain road miles in any of nine road categories. Counties that contain any of these blocks are shaded light gray, and as you zoom in and mouse over these counties you will see more information on the potentially eligible blocks, including population, road miles (S1100, S1200, and S1400 categories only), and the name and number of the CMA in which the blocks are located. Further zooming in allows you to see the US Census tracts that contain these blocks.

Image: Screenshot of the FCC’s Mobility Fund Phase 1 Potentially Eligible Areas interactive map. Click through to explore.

H/T: GigaOm.

Not Your Basic Cable →

In 2010 Google announced that it would lay down high-speed network infrastructure for one lucky American city. After more than 1,100 municipalities applied for Google Fiber, Kansas City was named the winner.

And today Google starts laying some cable.

For lucky Kansas City residents, they’ll soon have high-speed broadband that downloads 100 times faster than “normal” Internet access and uploads 1,000 times faster than average.

Via ReadWriteWeb:

Kansas City won the Google Fiber competition because it met all of Google’s various requirements. “Our goal was to find a location where we could build efficiently, make an impact on the community, and develop working partnerships with the local government, utility and community organizations,” its FAQ says. “We believe we’ve found this in both Kansas City, Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri.”

[Google manager Kevin] Lo says the network will use “thousands of miles” of cable. The backbone of the network will be built first, and then Google Fiber will be connected to homes around Kansas City.

For the envious rest of us there is the possibility of longer term benefits. By demonstrating that these speeds are attainable, the public (and market) might beat traditional providers like Verizon, Comcast, Cox and Optimum with an encouragement stick to reinvest in their infrastructure to attain similar if not greater speeds.

Maybe. It wasn’t too long ago that “[t]he biggest U.S. Internet service providers urged regulators to adopt a conservative definition of “broadband,” arguing for minimum speeds that were substantially below many other nations,” according to Reuters.

The United States, after all, barely cracks the global top 30 in terms of Internet speed.

For Google, there’s long-range benefits as well. The faster the Internet goes, the better Google apps run. The better Google apps run, the more money they make. Call it enlightened self interest with potential benefits for all of us.