Posts tagged browsers

Coincidence?

Coincidence?

And There We Go
Via

And There We Go

Via

I had a question about the “Browser Statistics” data visualization you posted earlier: Whichever way you look at it, would you say that the use of Chrome has steadily climbed from 2007-ish to the present? If yes, depending on the visualization, does the percentage vary? To my eyes, it looks like it’s hovering at the 36% range. Or, may be not. — Asked by tart-pastry

Hi Ally,

I should have spelled things out more in the post but wanted people to look at it themselves and see how the information appears to change depending on how the chart is tilted.

For the yearly numbers I chose statistics from December of each year (except 2012 where I chose June). Chrome first makes its appearance in September 2008 with 3.1% market share. By December it rose to 3.6%. Afterwards, it looks like this:

  • 2009: 9.8%
  • 2010: 22.4%
  • 2011: 34.6%
  • 2012: 41.7%

Looking at what I posted though gives the viewer a sense that Chrome’s final number (41.7%) could actually be somewhere in the high 20s to low 30s (the lime colored on where we’re looking down at the chart), or even up in the 50s (the orange colored one where we’re looking up at the chart).

Like most things, perspective matters.

Browser Statistics: 2002 - 2012

Looking at how different views of the same data give a different feel to the overall information.

Data comes from W3Schools. AOL, Mozilla and Netscape were discarded.

Select any to embiggen.

UPDATE: If confused at what we’re getting at, see here.

Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer as the Web’s most popular browser
Filed under that didn’t take long. Chrome’s first public, stable release was in December 2008. The first version of Internet Explorer, 1995.
In 2002-2003, IE controlled about 95% of the browser market.
More info via The Next Web.
Image via StatCounter.

Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer as the Web’s most popular browser

Filed under that didn’t take long. Chrome’s first public, stable release was in December 2008. The first version of Internet Explorer, 1995.

In 2002-2003, IE controlled about 95% of the browser market.

More info via The Next Web.

Image via StatCounter.

Miscrosoft’s Peculiar Internet Explorer Campaign

Reading from the Dominos mea culpa pizza commercial playbook, Microsoft has a we don’t suck so much marketing campaign for Internet Explorer 9.

In the amusing spot a man talks to his therapist about how his urge to get people to uninstall the browser is over. Internet Explorer 9 is really that good! They even have a Tumblr to back up the good news, and offer a slack-hearted rationale for giving IE9 a try:

Your current browser is probably great…

So keep using it. But there are probably a few sites that you go to everyday, like Facebook and Pandora. And for just those sites, try using Internet Explorer. By pinning Pandora to the taskbar you can get to Pandora in one click. And when you do, you might find some stuff you like in Internet Explorer.

Inspired.

Time once was that Internet Explorer controlled ninety-plus percent of the browser market. Those times have changed. For the first time since the Jurassic days of the Netscape versus Internet Explorer browser wars, a new browser (Chrome) became the world’s most popular. At least for a day.

Reviews of IE9 are quite good. This should hearten developers who previously cursed Microsoft’s lack of support for emerging standards, and proprietary implementation of common features.

Whether IE9 will get regular people to download and use it is another question. As they say, “Your current browser is probably great.” So why would a few discrete features motivate people to move away from them?

Microsoft to Finally Kill IE6
Designers and developers responsible for maintaining IE6 support can come out from under their desks. Microsoft is about to kill off its notoriously difficult browser with automatic upgrades for Windows users.
As Gizmodo puts it, ” [T]hat’s a good thing—the web needs to get rid of this crap.”:

Right now [IE6] usage is at 8.3 percent, which means that millions of users out there are using obsolete technology. Microsoft has decided to kill it fast: starting next month, they will upgrade Windows users automatically to the latest version of Internet Explorer supported by the computers. This, Microsoft says, will put the usage down to less than 1 percent.

Image: IE6 usage by country as of November 30, 2011, via Net Applications.

Microsoft to Finally Kill IE6

Designers and developers responsible for maintaining IE6 support can come out from under their desks. Microsoft is about to kill off its notoriously difficult browser with automatic upgrades for Windows users.

As Gizmodo puts it, ” [T]hat’s a good thing—the web needs to get rid of this crap.”:

Right now [IE6] usage is at 8.3 percent, which means that millions of users out there are using obsolete technology. Microsoft has decided to kill it fast: starting next month, they will upgrade Windows users automatically to the latest version of Internet Explorer supported by the computers. This, Microsoft says, will put the usage down to less than 1 percent.

Image: IE6 usage by country as of November 30, 2011, via Net Applications.

chaztoo:

Behold, the horrors of Communism.
-via ie6countdown.com

Indeed. Do your bit to put that browser out to pasture with this bit of code from from IE6 No More.

chaztoo:

Behold, the horrors of Communism.

-via ie6countdown.com

Indeed. Do your bit to put that browser out to pasture with this bit of code from from IE6 No More.

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.
The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.
The Argument: 

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…
…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.
It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”. 

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.

The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.

The Argument:

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…

…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.

It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”.

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

If RSS isn’t saved now, if browser vendors don’t realise the potential of RSS to save users a whole bunch of time and make the web better for them, then the alternative is that I will have to have a Facebook account, or a Twitter account, or some such corporate-controlled identity, where I have to “Like” or “Follow” every website’s partner account that I’m interested in, and then have to deal with the privacy violations and problems related with corporate owned identity owning a list of every website I’m interested in (and wanting to monetise that list), and they, and every website I’m interested in, knowing every other website I’m interested in following, and then I have to log in and check this corporate owned identity every day in order to find out what’s new on other websites, whilst I’m advertised to, because they are only interested in making the biggest and the best walled garden that I can’t leave.

This Morning in Media Consumption

Use Chrome? Then perhaps you should install Cortex, a nifty little plugin that helps you share and publish found content quickly.

Via Mashable:

Here’s the gist of it: Install the extension, find content you want to share, then click and hold. When you do, your mouse will be surrounded by a wheel of options. Flick your mouse in the correct direction, release your finger and voilà, your content is shared to Twitter, to Tumblr, to a specific Facebook friend’s wall — wherever you desire — accompanied by a charming “whoosh” sound.

Needless to say, we’re sold on the whoosh.