posts about or somewhat related to ‘charts’

All About the #Selfies
Via Wired:

Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category…
…In its short lifespan, the selfie has gone from pop culture phenomenon to academic lab rat. For obvious reasons, these photos are a psychological research goldmine, but there’s been little done in the way of objectively looking at the photos’ content to see how it might reflect the actual world we live in. Selfiecity looks at the trend through a window, not a microscope. Instead of zeroing in on a single narrow element, the Selfiecity project is broken down into a few broad areas: main findings, contextual essays and interactive data visualizations. “We wanted to look at this phenomena from different perspectives,” Manovich explains.
Selfiecity analyzes Instagram data for visual cues like head position, emotional expression, gender and age, in order to get a clearer picture of how (and how often) people actually take selfies in different cultures. “The idea was to confront the generalizations about selfies, which are not based on data, with actual data,” says Manovich. “We wanted to look at what the actual patterns are.”

So, check Selfiecity, it’s mesmerizing.
And then, perhaps, check #SELFIE (Official Music Video), a techno ode to all things selfie, crowdsourced “from so many amazing and funny ppl.”
Image: Selfies in New York, via Wired.

All About the #Selfies

Via Wired:

Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category…

…In its short lifespan, the selfie has gone from pop culture phenomenon to academic lab rat. For obvious reasons, these photos are a psychological research goldmine, but there’s been little done in the way of objectively looking at the photos’ content to see how it might reflect the actual world we live in. Selfiecity looks at the trend through a window, not a microscope. Instead of zeroing in on a single narrow element, the Selfiecity project is broken down into a few broad areas: main findings, contextual essays and interactive data visualizations. “We wanted to look at this phenomena from different perspectives,” Manovich explains.

Selfiecity analyzes Instagram data for visual cues like head position, emotional expression, gender and age, in order to get a clearer picture of how (and how often) people actually take selfies in different cultures. “The idea was to confront the generalizations about selfies, which are not based on data, with actual data,” says Manovich. “We wanted to look at what the actual patterns are.”

So, check Selfiecity, it’s mesmerizing.

And then, perhaps, check #SELFIE (Official Music Video), a techno ode to all things selfie, crowdsourced “from so many amazing and funny ppl.”

Image: Selfies in New York, via Wired.

Broadcast Time for Obamacare vs. Typhoon Haiyan
Pew just released a study on how four major cable news networks divvied up air time to spend on two big stories last week (Nov 11-15): the Obamacare changes and the deadly aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. 80 hours of programming were studied: 4 hours per channel per day, 1 during daytime and 3 during primetime. The findings speak for themselves in the chart above.

The two channels with strong ideological identities in prime-time—liberal MSBNC and conservative Fox News—spent far more time on the politically-charged health insurance story than the overseas disaster. And the two organizations that built a brand on global reporting—CNN and Al Jazeera America, an offshoot of the Qatar-based Al Jazeera media network—spent considerably more time on the tragedy in the Philippines.

Image: Screenshot from Pew.

Broadcast Time for Obamacare vs. Typhoon Haiyan

Pew just released a study on how four major cable news networks divvied up air time to spend on two big stories last week (Nov 11-15): the Obamacare changes and the deadly aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. 80 hours of programming were studied: 4 hours per channel per day, 1 during daytime and 3 during primetime. The findings speak for themselves in the chart above.

The two channels with strong ideological identities in prime-time—liberal MSBNC and conservative Fox News—spent far more time on the politically-charged health insurance story than the overseas disaster. And the two organizations that built a brand on global reporting—CNN and Al Jazeera America, an offshoot of the Qatar-based Al Jazeera media network—spent considerably more time on the tragedy in the Philippines.

Image: Screenshot from Pew.

Coincidence?

Coincidence?

The Cost of Snail Mail
Yesterday’s chart from the Economist about the cost of sending snail mail caught my attention for two reasons:
If I think about it — and since I saw the chart I started thinking about it — I’m still amazed that you can give some entity a physical object and they’ll deliver it pretty much anywhere for 45 cents (in the US). Then again, the US Postal Service loses $25 million per day.
A few weeks ago, I sent my first physical letter in about as long as I can remember. I’d received an invoice for two cents so put three pennies in an envelope with a note telling them to keep the change.
Image: Cost of Sending a Standard-Sized Letter Domestically, via the Economist.

The Cost of Snail Mail

Yesterday’s chart from the Economist about the cost of sending snail mail caught my attention for two reasons:

  • If I think about it — and since I saw the chart I started thinking about it — I’m still amazed that you can give some entity a physical object and they’ll deliver it pretty much anywhere for 45 cents (in the US). Then again, the US Postal Service loses $25 million per day.
  • A few weeks ago, I sent my first physical letter in about as long as I can remember. I’d received an invoice for two cents so put three pennies in an envelope with a note telling them to keep the change.

Image: Cost of Sending a Standard-Sized Letter Domestically, via the Economist.

A feature length movie is an amazing dataset. You just need to know how to look at it, and you need the right tools.

For his senior project at the Royal Academy of Arts, Den Haag, Frederic Brodbeck created his own software programs that dissembled video files into their constituent parts. In this way he was able to identify elements such as video, audio, subtitles, as well as gathering information average shot length, motion measuring, color palettes and more. 

cinemetrics is about measuring and visualizing movie data, in order to reveal the characteristics of films and to create a visual “fingerprint” for them. Information such as the editing structure, color, speech or motion are extracted, analyzed and transformed into graphic representations so that movies can be seen as a whole and easily interpreted or compared side by side.

Brilliant, my fine friend. Brilliant.

h/t Motionographer

(Source: cinemetrics.fredericbrodbeck.de)

A snazzy explainer video produced by Column 5 Media about the purpose and value of infographics, where data meets design. Spotting trends in data is much easier with the use of color, size and orientation. In this way the human eye is capable of processing very complex stories told visually within 250 milliseconds. That is, if infographics are done well. 

The Connected States of America shows the invisible ties that bind Americans based on where they live, and where they are calling.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)

The storytelling power of infographics has hit hardtop with a new, customizable stencil set from artist Golan Levin. The sprayable, laser-cut setup allows users the combine thought-provoking text and an accompanying pie chart.
What they may lack as far as the intricacy and richness of computer-generated infographics, these stencils more than make up for it with the immediacy and intensity of graffiti art. 

The storytelling power of infographics has hit hardtop with a new, customizable stencil set from artist Golan Levin. The sprayable, laser-cut setup allows users the combine thought-provoking text and an accompanying pie chart.

What they may lack as far as the intricacy and richness of computer-generated infographics, these stencils more than make up for it with the immediacy and intensity of graffiti art. 

futuramb:

Congress Members Produce 30% Fewer Tweets After Weinergate [INFOGRAPHIC]
emergentfutures:

CHART OF THE DAY: Proof The iPad Is Affecting Consumer PC Sales
 
Microsoft’s consumer PC sales growth has pretty much never declined. Not even when Microsoft released Vista. Not even when the economy went in the toilet.
But suddenly, the growth of sales is about to go negative, says Citi analyst Walter Pritchard
Full Story: Business Insider

emergentfutures:

CHART OF THE DAY: Proof The iPad Is Affecting Consumer PC Sales

Microsoft’s consumer PC sales growth has pretty much never declined. Not even when Microsoft released Vista. Not even when the economy went in the toilet.

But suddenly, the growth of sales is about to go negative, says Citi analyst Walter Pritchard



Full Story: Business Insider

Did you know a political conservative is more likely to prefer McDonald’s french fries than his liberal counterpart? He’s also more likely to qualify Chinese takeout as “exotic ethnic food.”
On the other hand, self-identified left-leaners are more likely to drink wine with meals at home (conservatives go for juice or milk), and they’re also more likely than conservatives to enjoy beer drinking.
Via Mashable

Did you know a political conservative is more likely to prefer McDonald’s french fries than his liberal counterpart? He’s also more likely to qualify Chinese takeout as “exotic ethnic food.”

On the other hand, self-identified left-leaners are more likely to drink wine with meals at home (conservatives go for juice or milk), and they’re also more likely than conservatives to enjoy beer drinking.

Via Mashable

krochmal:

(via 16 Experts Answer, “What makes a great infographic?” — It’s All About Revenue)

"I think a great infographic is an imbalanced equation: the amount of information conveyed is disproportionate to the time it takes the viewer to process it." 
Agreed, the longer a graphic can hold the reader’s attention, the better the story. 

krochmal:

(via 16 Experts Answer, “What makes a great infographic?” — It’s All About Revenue)

"I think a great infographic is an imbalanced equation: the amount of information conveyed is disproportionate to the time it takes the viewer to process it." 

Agreed, the longer a graphic can hold the reader’s attention, the better the story. 

The best thing to come out of the decline of print and legacy media—thus far—has been a torrent of cool infographics. Online customer service provider GetSatisfaction takes a stab at the ongoing topic of struggling publishers and their bleeding ledgers, with this chart. 

The best thing to come out of the decline of print and legacy media—thus far—has been a torrent of cool infographics. Online customer service provider GetSatisfaction takes a stab at the ongoing topic of struggling publishers and their bleeding ledgers, with this chart. 

justinellis:

Lovely AND handy. Behold this period table of threats to our existence, from “collapse of causality” to “genetic modification,” “pandemic” and “animal flatulence”) Get your copy of A is for Armageddon. 
Or, you know, be unprepared for the End of Days. Which, is like next week, right? (Which, coincidentally, is my mother’s birthday. Wait, does that make me…OH MY GOD.) 

justinellis:

Lovely AND handy. Behold this period table of threats to our existence, from “collapse of causality” to “genetic modification,” “pandemic” and “animal flatulence”) Get your copy of A is for Armageddon. 

Or, you know, be unprepared for the End of Days. Which, is like next week, right? (Which, coincidentally, is my mother’s birthday. Wait, does that make me…OH MY GOD.)