posts about or somewhat related to ‘children’

WAR-TOYS
Via Wired:

At the Spafford Children’s Center for in East Jerusalem, L.A.–based photographer Brian McCarty watched as a little girl made a crayon drawing of a dead boy. She carefully colors in a red pool of blood around his body. It was a drawing that McCarty would later use to stage one of his photographs for WAR-TOYS, a series that recreates children’s memories and fears of conflict in the Middle East with toys.
“Play can become a mechanism for healing,” says McCarty. Drawing on the tenets of art and play therapy, which help children express emotions in non-verbal ways, he sees WAR-TOYS as providing witness to the often unseen impact of armed conflict on children, while serving as part of these children’s therapeutic process.

According to Wired, McCarty worked with children on the West Bank, Gaza and Jerusalem, and hopes to collaborate with others on this series in Afghanistan, Sudan and Colombia.
Image: Resilience, by Brian McCarty, via Wired. Select to embiggen. Read through for more photos and the rest of the story.

WAR-TOYS

Via Wired:

At the Spafford Children’s Center for in East Jerusalem, L.A.–based photographer Brian McCarty watched as a little girl made a crayon drawing of a dead boy. She carefully colors in a red pool of blood around his body. It was a drawing that McCarty would later use to stage one of his photographs for WAR-TOYS, a series that recreates children’s memories and fears of conflict in the Middle East with toys.

“Play can become a mechanism for healing,” says McCarty. Drawing on the tenets of art and play therapy, which help children express emotions in non-verbal ways, he sees WAR-TOYS as providing witness to the often unseen impact of armed conflict on children, while serving as part of these children’s therapeutic process.

According to Wired, McCarty worked with children on the West Bank, Gaza and Jerusalem, and hopes to collaborate with others on this series in Afghanistan, Sudan and Colombia.

Image: Resilience, by Brian McCarty, via Wired. Select to embiggen. Read through for more photos and the rest of the story.

CMRUBINWORLDAUTHOR: How Will We Read: Newspapers? →

cmrubinworld:


“Nothing replaces a good editor, and I would add, a good visual editor, creating the news for the reader so that it makes enjoyable and interesting reading.” — Francois Dufour

There are many more ways to read news material these days, thanks to the Internet. The Internet makes news easy to…

Could a new generation, raised on print newspapers from childhood, be the key to saving print media? I hope you’ll read this fascinating interview with Francois Dufour, the editor and chief and co-founder of Play Bac, publishers of Mon Quotidien, the first daily print newspaper for kids. The aim is to get kids to read for 10 minutes per day.

Delivered six times per week with the mail, the three age-targeted dailies have 150,000 subscribers and 2 million readers in France.

Kids love them because the content is not adult news explained to kids! It is news a nine or 12 or 15 year-old is interested in. We seldom feature an article on the same day it is published in adult news. One exception was the day bin Laden was killed. Also, I think kids like the fact that our papers are short (four to eight pages long). Our papers are also very visual. Finally, the journalism in our newspapers is serious. It is not childish.

While the newspaper has been downloadable for more than one year, Dufour says that only about 150 people per day read the app version of the publication.

Full Story…

Your future audience has arrived. 
A study on children by Sesame Workshop and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center  concludes that TV still rules the roost but the Internet is gaining ground, with 80% of those under five going online at least once a week. 
Original Report. H/T: Mashable. Photo via Padawan Neophyte on Flickr.
Random aside: whatever happened to playing with blocks?

Your future audience has arrived. 

A study on children by Sesame Workshop and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center  concludes that TV still rules the roost but the Internet is gaining ground, with 80% of those under five going online at least once a week. 

Original Report. H/T: Mashable. Photo via Padawan Neophyte on Flickr.

Random aside: whatever happened to playing with blocks?