Posts tagged collaboration

Soda/Pop/Coke: How Americans Talk

In 2003, then Harvard professor Bert Vaux conducted the Harvard Dialect Survey, in which he interviewed tens of thousands of Americans about how they talk, and released the results here

In 2012, graduate student Joshua Katz used the data to create a beautiful set of interactive dialect maps.

And in 2013, The Atlantic called up a lot of people, asked them some of Bert Vaux’s questions, layered them over maps inspired by Katz’s and made the video above.

On the Importance of Journalists Understanding Technology


The latest in our conversation with Farai Chideya, in which she discusses her own experiences learning new technologies and how—especially as an entrepreneur in the journalism world—knowing the tech side of things has helped her collaborate, innovate, and pursue great journalism.

But editors and professors recognize that the best way to understand the future of journalism lies in learning from and working with students.

And so, Mercer University is starting a $5.6 million project to collaborate with the Macon Newspaper and Georgia Public Radio.

via The New York Times:

Reporters and editors for the 186-year-old paper The Telegraph and the radio station will work out of the campus’s new journalism center, alongside students whom the university expects will do legwork for newspaper and public radio reports, with guidance from their professors and working journalists. 

It’s a plan born in part of desperation. Like many newspapers, The Telegraph has lost circulation and advertising revenue in the last decade, and the public radio station was forced to trim down to one staff member during the recession. 

William D. Underwood, Mercer’s president, expects that by applying what he calls a medical residency model to journalism, all of these players may give the struggling industry a chance to stay alive.

Bonus: This report [PDF] from the New America Foundation entitled “Shaping 21st Century Journalism: Leveraging a ‘Teaching Hospital Model’ in Journalism Education”

todaysdocument:

The National Archives is an official Wikimaniac!
We’re happy to announce that the National Archives is partnering with Wikimedia D.C. on Wikimania 2012, which is being held in Washington D.C this year, July 12-14. We are thrilled to be able to work together with Wikimedia D.C. on its conference in order to promote our common values: citizen engagement, collaboration, innovation, and the sharing of free knowledge. We join the Department of State’s Office of eDiplomacy, the Library of Congress, and the Broadcasting Board of Governors as fellow Wikimania partners. In addition, David Ferriero will be giving the conference’s closing plenary speech.
We have been collaborating with Wikimedia D.C. and the Wikimedia community for over a year. Last year, the National Archives hosted Wikipedia’s 10th anniversary celebration for the D.C. area and brought on a Wikipedian in Residence. Since then, we have cooperated on a number of projects and hosted several on-site events around the country—including the multi-day GLAMcamp D.C. conference this February and a meetup just this month hosted by the National Archives at Kansas City. We value the contributions Wikipedians have made as citizen archivists. We look forward to collaborating with Wikimedia into the future, and are making plans for the upcoming Wikipedia Loves Libraries campaign.
We know that Wikimania will be an amazing opportunity to engage with a large and diverse international group of volunteers, activists, fellow lovers of knowledge, (most importantly!) citizen archivists. At the National Archives, we have been Wikipedians, and even Wikisourcerors, for more than a year, and are proud now to be able to call ourselves Wikmaniacs as well. Are you as excited as we are? You can learn more about Wikimania at their web site, and even find out how to volunteer.
via NARAtions » The National Archives is an official Wikimaniac

todaysdocument:

The National Archives is an official Wikimaniac!

We’re happy to announce that the National Archives is partnering with Wikimedia D.C. on Wikimania 2012, which is being held in Washington D.C this year, July 12-14. We are thrilled to be able to work together with Wikimedia D.C. on its conference in order to promote our common values: citizen engagement, collaboration, innovation, and the sharing of free knowledge. We join the Department of State’s Office of eDiplomacy, the Library of Congress, and the Broadcasting Board of Governors as fellow Wikimania partners. In addition, David Ferriero will be giving the conference’s closing plenary speech.

We have been collaborating with Wikimedia D.C. and the Wikimedia community for over a year. Last year, the National Archives hosted Wikipedia’s 10th anniversary celebration for the D.C. area and brought on a Wikipedian in Residence. Since then, we have cooperated on a number of projects and hosted several on-site events around the country—including the multi-day GLAMcamp D.C. conference this February and a meetup just this month hosted by the National Archives at Kansas City. We value the contributions Wikipedians have made as citizen archivists. We look forward to collaborating with Wikimedia into the future, and are making plans for the upcoming Wikipedia Loves Libraries campaign.

We know that Wikimania will be an amazing opportunity to engage with a large and diverse international group of volunteers, activists, fellow lovers of knowledge, (most importantly!) citizen archivists. At the National Archives, we have been Wikipedians, and even Wikisourcerors, for more than a year, and are proud now to be able to call ourselves Wikmaniacs as well. Are you as excited as we are? You can learn more about Wikimania at their web site, and even find out how to volunteer.

via NARAtions » The National Archives is an official Wikimaniac

Data and Peer Production with Wikimedia’s Dario Taraborelli

I spoke with Dario Taraborelli, Senior Research Analyst at the Wikimedia Foundation, a few days ago. What interested me is a new open data and research infrastructure initiative Wikimedia is pursuing in order to put data in the hands of a wider audience.

What also interests me is how Wikimedia is implementing it: namely, by creating an online space for data consultations in order to really hear from data wranglers and journalists about what they’re looking for in an open data platform.

Dario talks about a number of initiatives Wikimedia is pursuing and resources it’s providing to do so. Here’s a hit list of sites he mentions if you’d like to explore:

Semantic Metadata

Geolocation Data

Pageview Data, Trending Topics, Real-time Edit Data

Wikimedia Research Hub

And, most importantly: the Wikimedia Foundation’s open data consultation.

Run Time: ~25:00

Google Plussed
Google Plus is releasing a number of new features, one of which is Ripples (pictured above). Ripples visualize how a post is shared across the entire network, as well as within small networks (in G+ parlance, Circles). That is:

The ripple diagram shows this post spreading as users share it on Google+. Arrows indicate a user receiving the post, then resharing. Circles within circles represent a resharing sequence, so large circles indicate busy resharing.

Also released is Google Plus for organizations using Google Apps. This could be interesting for geographically dispersed editorial teams as they collaborate on documents. For example, a reporter has a story in Google Docs and she and her editor can hop into Hangouts (G+’s video conferencing) and co-create within it.
And finally, Picassa got an update. G+ uses this for image sharing and it now includes new editing filters. Google is calling this the G+ Creative Kit:

Google+ Creative Kit, [is] a fast and friendly way to make powerful edits to your photos. Now you can add that vintage feel to your vacation photos. Or sharpen those snapshots from the family barbeque. Or add some text for added personality.

For more, Mashable fills in the details.

Google Plussed

Google Plus is releasing a number of new features, one of which is Ripples (pictured above). Ripples visualize how a post is shared across the entire network, as well as within small networks (in G+ parlance, Circles). That is:

The ripple diagram shows this post spreading as users share it on Google+. Arrows indicate a user receiving the post, then resharing. Circles within circles represent a resharing sequence, so large circles indicate busy resharing.

Also released is Google Plus for organizations using Google Apps. This could be interesting for geographically dispersed editorial teams as they collaborate on documents. For example, a reporter has a story in Google Docs and she and her editor can hop into Hangouts (G+’s video conferencing) and co-create within it.

And finally, Picassa got an update. G+ uses this for image sharing and it now includes new editing filters. Google is calling this the G+ Creative Kit:

Google+ Creative Kit, [is] a fast and friendly way to make powerful edits to your photos. Now you can add that vintage feel to your vacation photos. Or sharpen those snapshots from the family barbeque. Or add some text for added personality.

For more, Mashable fills in the details.

Historic recordings via the “Sounds of CCentury" SoundCloud group.
There are only a few track so far but the idea to co-create a “collection of historical or significant Creative Commons or No Rights Reserved tracks” is great.

Historic recordings via the “Sounds of CCentury" SoundCloud group.

There are only a few track so far but the idea to co-create a “collection of historical or significant Creative Commons or No Rights Reserved tracks” is great.

is there any way i could possibly submit anything into this tumblr? — Asked by everylittlething

Of course. Visit our Participate page

If you’re looking for themes and ideas see our About page to get a sense of what we’re trying to achieve.

Thanks!

When I worked on the Kosovo Special Report on BBC News Online in 1998, there were 3 of us in the team. I handled what we’d now call the data journalism of updating the daily record of allied bombings. But if social media had been around I could have corroborated those stories – I could have shown pictures of schools bombed-out when Nato said it was an armoury. However, this also highlights the issue of scale again: with twitter, facebook and youtube – and the need for broadcasters’ representatives to reside in the online community so that you can know the reputation and reliability of a source, or to use mass-corroboration as your principle – you need resource, huge resource, to be able to effectively operate as a broadcast journalist body. It’s a manpower challenge.

In the face of heightened globalization and with the U.S. engaged in two wars, many mainstream news organizations have turned their backs on foreign news. Newspapers and television networks alike provide much less of it. Many outlets have shuttered overseas bureaus. But a handful of promising startups offer some hope for the future. — American Journalism Review

Blogging platforms virtually did away with any idea of the front page and instead brought the reader right to the latest entry from the author or team of authors.

Most new media companies didn’t spend the money to build the kind of editing infrastructure that is needed to create a consistent personality. It’s the constant back-and-forth between several top editors or producers that results in a unified and consistent message. All reporters benefit from discussions with editors because it helps the reporter to understand the vision for the story and the expectations the readers are likely to have for it.

And all readers benefit from a media product that has been put together with thought and debate. It’s the difference between plain food and food cooked with a terrific sauce … a secret sauce.