posts about or somewhat related to ‘colombia’

A safe haven for journalists in Colombia
fjp-latinamerica:

La Otra Orilla (The Other Shore) is a Colombian website dedicated to publishing the work of threatened and displaced journalists of the country’s provinces. When independent journalists working in the provinces are threatened by the guerrilla, drug cartels or paramilitary groups, they usually relocate to Bogota, the capital, looking for safety. Soon, they lose their contacts, they are forced to stop writing and, eventually, lose their income source. The Other Shore seeks to support these journalists.


“As a member of La Otra Orilla I feel the support of the website and FLIP. They’re aware of your case and they value your security over a deadline. The journalist takes priority over the report” said Sonya Godoy to the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas.


Image: La Otra Orilla website.

A safe haven for journalists in Colombia

fjp-latinamerica:

La Otra Orilla (The Other Shore) is a Colombian website dedicated to publishing the work of threatened and displaced journalists of the country’s provinces.

When independent journalists working in the provinces are threatened by the guerrilla, drug cartels or paramilitary groups, they usually relocate to Bogota, the capital, looking for safety. Soon, they lose their contacts, they are forced to stop writing and, eventually, lose their income source. The Other Shore seeks to support these journalists.

“As a member of La Otra Orilla I feel the support of the website and FLIP. They’re aware of your case and they value your security over a deadline. The journalist takes priority over the report” said Sonya Godoy to the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas.

Image: La Otra Orilla website.

fjp-latinamerica:

Tracking peace talks in real time
If you are interested in following the Colombian government peace talks with the FARC guerrilla, you shouldn’t miss DialogosPorLaPaz. 
This website is dedicated to covering the unfolding negotiations between the government and the leftist guerrilla to end the 50 year old conflict between the rebels and the Colombian federal forces.
One of the most remarkable features of this project is how it incorporates the opinion of citizens around the dialogue, something that most of the traditional media outlets have been missing. 
DialogosPorLaPaz also measures the sentiment and perceptions of the people around the peace talks through a quantitative index that includes opinions expressed through social media and a series of web-based polls hosted in the website.
FJP: Although it’s clear that DialogosPorLaPaz focuses on citizens, we think that it would be very useful if it had official information about where the peace talks stands. This would serve as a reference to what citizens are reporting and commenting.
Image: DialogosPorLaPaz screenshot.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

Tracking peace talks in real time

If you are interested in following the Colombian government peace talks with the FARC guerrilla, you shouldn’t miss DialogosPorLaPaz

This website is dedicated to covering the unfolding negotiations between the government and the leftist guerrilla to end the 50 year old conflict between the rebels and the Colombian federal forces.

One of the most remarkable features of this project is how it incorporates the opinion of citizens around the dialogue, something that most of the traditional media outlets have been missing. 

DialogosPorLaPaz also measures the sentiment and perceptions of the people around the peace talks through a quantitative index that includes opinions expressed through social media and a series of web-based polls hosted in the website.

FJP: Although it’s clear that DialogosPorLaPaz focuses on citizens, we think that it would be very useful if it had official information about where the peace talks stands. This would serve as a reference to what citizens are reporting and commenting.

Image: DialogosPorLaPaz screenshot.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

The VO1CE Project: citizen journalism and developmentThink citizen journalism, think crowdsourcing, think video-documentaries, think advocacy, think mapping, think civic media. This is what the Vo1ce Project is about. An idea developed by Angelo Greco and Marija Govedarica focused on training citizens in underserved communities to report on sensitive issues and then publishing their findings on a web-based platform. Vo1ce’s goal is to foster community development by engaging marginalized localities in documenting and sharing information.“We decided to focus, at least on this early stage of the project, on covering censorship because the problem is everywhere, and we think it affects every single layer of the communities in the Americas”, said Greco, a graduate from The American University, during an interview in a cafe in Mexico City.Currently, Vo1ce has ongoing projects in Serbia, the USA, Mexico, Colombia and Brazil. Angelo was visiting Mexico City looking for citizen journalists, journalists, activists, and human rights advocates willing to join the censorship project that is about to take off in the Latin American countries. After his stop in Mexico, he traveled to Medellin, Colombia, also looking for supporters. (Interested in joining the cause? send an email to info@vo1ceproject.org)Why are they focusing in Latin America?The complexities of the region in terms of the challenges faced by underserved communities and the interest of professional journalists to mentor citizen journalists are a great mix they’ve found in the region, said Greco.According to Greco, the main challenges ahead for Vo1ce will be to find journalists and activists willing to join the cause, developing a friendly-yet-professional mobile app to help capture and transfer footage and then find the best way to publish the findings of their different projects in a visually compelling platform.The Vo1ce Project is an NGO currently going through a fundraising campaign.Image: Angelo and Marija founders of the Vo1ce Project.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

The VO1CE Project: citizen journalism and development

Think citizen journalism, think crowdsourcing, think video-documentaries, think advocacy, think mapping, think civic media. This is what the Vo1ce Project is about. An idea developed by Angelo Greco and Marija Govedarica focused on training citizens in underserved communities to report on sensitive issues and then publishing their findings on a web-based platform. Vo1ce’s goal is to foster community development by engaging marginalized localities in documenting and sharing information.

“We decided to focus, at least on this early stage of the project, on covering censorship because the problem is everywhere, and we think it affects every single layer of the communities in the Americas”, said Greco, a graduate from The American University, during an interview in a cafe in Mexico City.

Currently, Vo1ce has ongoing projects in Serbia, the USA, Mexico, Colombia and Brazil. Angelo was visiting Mexico City looking for citizen journalists, journalists, activists, and human rights advocates willing to join the censorship project that is about to take off in the Latin American countries. After his stop in Mexico, he traveled to Medellin, Colombia, also looking for supporters. (Interested in joining the cause? send an email to info@vo1ceproject.org)

Why are they focusing in Latin America?
The complexities of the region in terms of the challenges faced by underserved communities and the interest of professional journalists to mentor citizen journalists are a great mix they’ve found in the region, said Greco.

According to Greco, the main challenges ahead for Vo1ce will be to find journalists and activists willing to join the cause, developing a friendly-yet-professional mobile app to help capture and transfer footage and then find the best way to publish the findings of their different projects in a visually compelling platform.

The Vo1ce Project is an NGO currently going through a fundraising campaign.

Image: Angelo and Marija founders of the Vo1ce Project.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

Looking for truth in the graffiti art of Bogotá
The Guardian is featuring a fantastic gallery on urban graffiti in Bogotá (Colombia’s capital city). This particular piece addresses the former president with the words ‘I will dance on your grave’.
All of the photographs were taken by photojournalist Tom Feiling, who has been living in said beautiful city for more than a decade (and don’t miss the cutlines for additional storytelling). 
Image: Bailaré sobre tu tumba, by Tom Feiling. Via The Guardian.

fjp-latinamerica:

Looking for truth in the graffiti art of Bogotá

The Guardian is featuring a fantastic gallery on urban graffiti in Bogotá (Colombia’s capital city). This particular piece addresses the former president with the words ‘I will dance on your grave’.

All of the photographs were taken by photojournalist Tom Feiling, who has been living in said beautiful city for more than a decade (and don’t miss the cutlines for additional storytelling). 

Image: Bailaré sobre tu tumba, by Tom Feiling. Via The Guardian.

How journalists helped stabilize a new Colombia →

fjp-latinamerica:

CJR’s Justin D. Martin posted today an interesting article about the regeneration of Colombia through international coverage and the role that journalists have played to that effect. 

Via Columbia Journalism Review:

Michael LaRosa and German Mejia wrote in a 2012 history of the country: “Global media have shifted significantly in the way they cover Colombia. Stories focusing on tourism, restaurants, Colombian tennis stars, and positive reviews of literary works…suggest the US media’s perception of the Andean nation is evolving away from the myopic, one-dimensional view that marked earlier portrayals of the country.”

And as for domestic journalists and their perceptions: It’s easier for reporters to focus on a country’s positives when they aren’t being murdered.

A career in Colombian journalism today, though, is no longer a notarized death wish. Sporadic violence against reporters still exists but dead journalists are much less a seasonal feature in Colombia today.

Read on for thought-provoking quotes from former president César Gaviria and the editorial staff of national newspaper El Tiempo.

FJP: Probably the grandest Latin American pet peeve ever: Colombia ≠ Columbia

If you haven’t yet, take a look at what’s going on over at FJP Latin America. — Michael

fjp-latinamerica:

Biblioburro: a living library that gathers stories

We just came across with the Biblioburro project, a circulating library-on-hooves that connects the minds and imagination of needy Colombian children:

BiblioBurro (Biblio = Library / Burro=Donkey) is a traveling library that distributes books to patrons from the backs of two donkeys, Alfa and Beto. The combination of the donkey Names (Alfa and Beto compose he word alfabetpo = Alphabet).

Grade-school teacher Luis Soriano developed the idea after witnessing first-hand the power reading had on his students, most of whom had lived through intense life conflicts at a young age. Starting in the late 1990s, Soriano traveled to communities in Colombia’s Caribbean Sea hinterlands with a portable library, which began with 70 books. It now has 4,800 books.

Last year, the project was featured in a delightful POV documentary film (“heartwarming yet unsentimental”) directed by Carlos Rendón Zipagauta. Here is one of the passages that caught our attention:

In some of the film’s most affecting scenes, Soriano encourages the children who gather at his stopovers to tell stories and draw pictures describing their lives. One by one, horrific tales of paramilitary massacres, mutilations and other violent traumas emerge, and the children depict the sadness and fear that shadow their daily existence. 

FJP: Biblioburro has now become an institution in Colombia. Soriano still commutes from village to village in a one-man quest to rescue his country by rescuing some of its poorest children. For them, the Biblioburro represents recreation, education, and more recently, an outlet to tell their own stories to the world. We’ll listen.

Colombia has some very innovative programs for getting books into people’s hands. For example, Paradero Para Libros Para Parques places bookstands in parks, staffs them and lets people check out books.

Colombia Brings Libraries to the Park
Via Bilingual Librarian:

Monday morning I was out walking around downtown Bogota when I happened upon this lovely little library in the park. This stand makes part of the Paradero Para Libros Para Parques (PPP), a program created about 10 years ago to help promote literacy across the country. The program is part of Fundalectura in association with city parks.
Currently there are 47 PPP in various neighborhoods of Bogota, and a total of 100 across the country. Each stand is staffed for about 12 hours a week by volunteer (they do receive a small stipend, but apparently it isn’t much).
The PPP are often open during the weekend and while in service they offer regular library services. Patrons can check books out, and the person staffing the PPP organizes activities (mainly for children), is available to answer questions, and often help children with their homework.

Colombia Brings Libraries to the Park

Via Bilingual Librarian:

Monday morning I was out walking around downtown Bogota when I happened upon this lovely little library in the park. This stand makes part of the Paradero Para Libros Para Parques (PPP), a program created about 10 years ago to help promote literacy across the country. The program is part of Fundalectura in association with city parks.

Currently there are 47 PPP in various neighborhoods of Bogota, and a total of 100 across the country. Each stand is staffed for about 12 hours a week by volunteer (they do receive a small stipend, but apparently it isn’t much).

The PPP are often open during the weekend and while in service they offer regular library services. Patrons can check books out, and the person staffing the PPP organizes activities (mainly for children), is available to answer questions, and often help children with their homework.