posts about or somewhat related to ‘conflict reporting’

Photographing Ebola in Liberia
John Moore, a senior staff photographer from Getty Images, is covering the Ebola outbreak in Liberia.
In the New York Times, he writes:

I have worked in high-risk environments with some frequency in my career, but instead of a flak jacket and helmet, this time I brought anticontamination suits, including coveralls, masks, goggles, rubber gloves and boot covers, all of which are disposable after a single use in places like Ebola isolation wards. I stocked up on antiseptic gel, wipes and sprays. I also brought rubber boots, which were lent to me by my father-in-law, a retired journalist who is now a fisherman. He said I could keep them.
Here in Liberia, I wash my hands in chlorinated water at the entrance to most buildings, dozens of times a day, whether I have gloves on or not. Because Ebola is not airborne but is rather transmitted through bodily fluids, it’s important not to touch your face after being in contaminated areas. We tend to touch our faces many times per day without realizing it. I’m trying hard to stay safe.

The Times has a gallery of Moore’s images here.
Bonus: Yesterday, NPR interviewed Moore about an incident in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, where protestors attacked a quarantine center and forced its patients to leave the facility. Moore tells NPR that “a fair number of people… believe that the Ebola virus and the epidemic is a hoax, that it’s not real after all, and it’s a way for the Liberian government to bring in foreign money.”
Image: John Moore wears his “personal protective equipment” before joining a Liberian burial team that was removing the body of an Ebola victim from her home, via the Daily Mail. The Mail also has a gallery of Moore’s work. Select to embiggen.

Photographing Ebola in Liberia

John Moore, a senior staff photographer from Getty Images, is covering the Ebola outbreak in Liberia.

In the New York Times, he writes:

I have worked in high-risk environments with some frequency in my career, but instead of a flak jacket and helmet, this time I brought anticontamination suits, including coveralls, masks, goggles, rubber gloves and boot covers, all of which are disposable after a single use in places like Ebola isolation wards. I stocked up on antiseptic gel, wipes and sprays. I also brought rubber boots, which were lent to me by my father-in-law, a retired journalist who is now a fisherman. He said I could keep them.

Here in Liberia, I wash my hands in chlorinated water at the entrance to most buildings, dozens of times a day, whether I have gloves on or not. Because Ebola is not airborne but is rather transmitted through bodily fluids, it’s important not to touch your face after being in contaminated areas. We tend to touch our faces many times per day without realizing it. I’m trying hard to stay safe.

The Times has a gallery of Moore’s images here.

Bonus: Yesterday, NPR interviewed Moore about an incident in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, where protestors attacked a quarantine center and forced its patients to leave the facility. Moore tells NPR that “a fair number of people… believe that the Ebola virus and the epidemic is a hoax, that it’s not real after all, and it’s a way for the Liberian government to bring in foreign money.”

Image: John Moore wears his “personal protective equipment” before joining a Liberian burial team that was removing the body of an Ebola victim from her home, via the Daily Mail. The Mail also has a gallery of Moore’s work. Select to embiggen.

On this, the 100th anniversary of the day the first world war began, it is sobering to look back at the way that conflict was so badly reported. The catalogue of journalistic misdeeds is a matter of record: the willingness to publish propaganda as fact, the apparently tame acceptance of censorship and the failure to hold power to account.

Roy Greenslade, The Guardian. First world war: how state and press kept truth off the front page.

FJP: The more things change…

breakingnews:

AP photographer killed, reporter wounded in Afghanistan
AP: Veteran Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed and AP reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded on Friday when an Afghan policeman opened fire while they were sitting in their car in eastern Afghanistan.
Follow more on this story at Breaking News
Photo: Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus poses for a photograph in Rome. (AP File Photo)

FJP — Via the BBC:

The attack took place in the town of Khost near the border with Pakistan…
…[The two journalists] had been travelling with election workers delivering ballots in the Tanay district of Khost province.
An eyewitness said a police unit commander had opened fire on the journalists as they were waiting for their convoy to move inside a security compound.
The police officer behind the attack was taken into custody after surrendering to other police…
…The BBC’s Afghanistan correspondent, David Loyn, says the election is being protected by the biggest military operation since the fall of the Taliban.
Nearly 200,000 troops have been deployed across the country to prevent attacks.
Rings of security have been set up around each polling centre, with the police at the centre and hundreds of troops on the outside.
Reporting restrictions are in place, limiting what can be broadcast about the candidates.

For what it’s worth, Niedringhaus was a former Nieman Fellow. Some of her work can be seen on her Tumblr. See also her 2007 essay in Nieman Reports on the emotions of photography, and this 2013 photo essay of her work in Afghanistan from the Atlantic.

breakingnews:

AP photographer killed, reporter wounded in Afghanistan

AP: Veteran Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed and AP reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded on Friday when an Afghan policeman opened fire while they were sitting in their car in eastern Afghanistan.

Follow more on this story at Breaking News

Photo: Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus poses for a photograph in Rome. (AP File Photo)

FJP — Via the BBC:

The attack took place in the town of Khost near the border with Pakistan…

…[The two journalists] had been travelling with election workers delivering ballots in the Tanay district of Khost province.

An eyewitness said a police unit commander had opened fire on the journalists as they were waiting for their convoy to move inside a security compound.

The police officer behind the attack was taken into custody after surrendering to other police…

The BBC’s Afghanistan correspondent, David Loyn, says the election is being protected by the biggest military operation since the fall of the Taliban.

Nearly 200,000 troops have been deployed across the country to prevent attacks.

Rings of security have been set up around each polling centre, with the police at the centre and hundreds of troops on the outside.

Reporting restrictions are in place, limiting what can be broadcast about the candidates.

For what it’s worth, Niedringhaus was a former Nieman Fellow. Some of her work can be seen on her Tumblr. See also her 2007 essay in Nieman Reports on the emotions of photography, and this 2013 photo essay of her work in Afghanistan from the Atlantic.

Homs 2011 v Homs 2014
Via @_amroali. Select to embiggen.

Homs 2011 v Homs 2014

Via @_amroali. Select to embiggen.

Meanwhile, In the Central African Republic
Via the New York Times Lens Blog: 

When mostly Christian militias loyal to the ousted president launched an attack on the Central African Republic’s capital, Bangui, on the morning of Dec. 5, the Associated Press photographer Jerome Delay was in his hotel. Cut off from his driver because of the fighting, Mr. Delay walked and caught rides from pro-government forces instead.
Corpses were laid in front of Parliament, on the streets and inside a mosque where about 50 bodies of women and men were being prepared for burial. He found 200 more when he went to the morgue the next day.
"It was horrifying. I’m an old hand in a way, and so as terrible as it sounds, I’m used to the smell of death,” said Mr. Delay, who is 53. "But that was unbearable. Absolutely unbearable."

FJP: Don’t know much about the Central African Republic? Here’s the Guardian’s current reporting on the sectarian fighting happening in the country. Here’s the same from The New York Times. And here’s a timeline of the country’s history from the BBC. 
Over at the United Nations, Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson has told the Security Council that the country’s “population is enduring suffering beyond imagination.”
The French foreign minister, whose country now has troops on the ground, recently warned that the Central African Republic “is on the verge of genocide.” 
Image: A French soldier speaks with Sincere Banyodi, a suspected Christian militia member wounded by machete blows in the Kokoro neighborhood of Bangui. By Jarome Delay/AP, via The New York Times. Select to embiggen.

Meanwhile, In the Central African Republic

Via the New York Times Lens Blog

When mostly Christian militias loyal to the ousted president launched an attack on the Central African Republic’s capital, Bangui, on the morning of Dec. 5, the Associated Press photographer Jerome Delay was in his hotel. Cut off from his driver because of the fighting, Mr. Delay walked and caught rides from pro-government forces instead.

Corpses were laid in front of Parliament, on the streets and inside a mosque where about 50 bodies of women and men were being prepared for burial. He found 200 more when he went to the morgue the next day.

"It was horrifying. I’m an old hand in a way, and so as terrible as it sounds, I’m used to the smell of death,” said Mr. Delay, who is 53. "But that was unbearable. Absolutely unbearable."

FJP: Don’t know much about the Central African Republic? Here’s the Guardian’s current reporting on the sectarian fighting happening in the country. Here’s the same from The New York Times. And here’s a timeline of the country’s history from the BBC

Over at the United Nations, Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson has told the Security Council that the country’s “population is enduring suffering beyond imagination.”

The French foreign minister, whose country now has troops on the ground, recently warned that the Central African Republic “is on the verge of genocide.” 

Image: A French soldier speaks with Sincere Banyodi, a suspected Christian militia member wounded by machete blows in the Kokoro neighborhood of Bangui. By Jarome Delay/AP, via The New York Times. Select to embiggen.

RIP
Molhem Barakat, 17-year-old photographer, killed while covering battle at Al-Kendi Hospital, Aleppo, Syria. Via Dita Sely.

RIP

Molhem Barakat, 17-year-old photographer, killed while covering battle at Al-Kendi Hospital, Aleppo, Syria. Via Dita Sely.

Meanwhile, in Syria

Over the last five days the Syrian government has driving into rebel-held Aleppo in order to reclaim the territory.

This video, from a Syrian activist, alleges to show what happened this morning (GRAPHIC).

According to Doctors Without Borders, “Airstrikes in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo have killed at least 189 people and wounded 879 people since December 15, according to local medical sources, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today. Among the injured are 244 children.”

Related: Syria ‘abducting civilians to spread terror’, UN says, via the BBC.

At the moment of execution the rebels grasped his throat. The young man put up a struggle. Three or four rebels pinned him down. The man tried to protect his throat with his hands, which were still tied together. He tried to resist but they were stronger than he was and they cut his throat. They raised his head into the air. People waved their guns and cheered. Everyone was happy that the execution had gone ahead.

That scene in Syria, that moment, was like a scene from the Middle Ages, the kind of thing you read about in history books. The war in Syria has reached the point where a person can be mercilessly killed in front of hundreds of people—who enjoy the spectacle.

As a human being I would never have wished to see what I saw. But as a journalist I have a camera and a responsibility. I have a responsibility to share what I saw that day. That’s why I am making this statement and that’s why I took the photographs. I will close this chapter soon and try never to remember it.

TIME Lightbox, Witness to a Syrian Execution: “I Saw a Scene of Utter Cruelty”.

Via TIME:

The perpetrators of atrocities themselves often use digital cameras or smartphones to photograph or film their acts of torture and murder, uploading the images to the Internet. These images and videos are used for propaganda, and their authenticity is often impossible to verify. It is very rare that a group of fighters from either side gives a professional photojournalist from a country outside Syria full and unfettered access to chronicle an atrocity as it unfolds. The images above are products of that access.

The photographer in the piece goes unnamed in order to protect him from repercussions when he returns to Syria. He reports that this was the fourth execution he had seen that day.

Packing for a War Zone
War correspondent Kevin Sites is returning to Afghanistan and shares what he’s packing with Boing Boing’s Xeni Jardin:

For news gathering, Canon Vixia, Nikon D90, GoPro 2, Macbook Air, HyperDrive, collapsible, fold-flat tripod and assorted cables and other odds and ends (nothing top of the line, just reliable and functional.)
Personal maintenance, filter water bottle, some instant coffee packets and some anti-bacterial wipes, three-sets of quick-dry, insect repellant treated clothing (Robert Young Pelton, author of the World’s Most Dangerous Place says he’s going to take away my man-card for that.)
Kevlar helmet and Type IIIA body armor —required for military embeds but not particularly helpful or recommended when reporting in Afghan communities, unilaterally.

Read through for the rest.
Image: Packing for Afghanistan, by Kevin Sites via Boing Boing. Select to embiggen.

Packing for a War Zone

War correspondent Kevin Sites is returning to Afghanistan and shares what he’s packing with Boing Boing’s Xeni Jardin:

For news gathering, Canon Vixia, Nikon D90, GoPro 2, Macbook Air, HyperDrive, collapsible, fold-flat tripod and assorted cables and other odds and ends (nothing top of the line, just reliable and functional.)

Personal maintenance, filter water bottle, some instant coffee packets and some anti-bacterial wipes, three-sets of quick-dry, insect repellant treated clothing (Robert Young Pelton, author of the World’s Most Dangerous Place says he’s going to take away my man-card for that.)

Kevlar helmet and Type IIIA body armor —required for military embeds but not particularly helpful or recommended when reporting in Afghan communities, unilaterally.

Read through for the rest.

Image: Packing for Afghanistan, by Kevin Sites via Boing Boing. Select to embiggen.

Giles Duley Interview
ifilikeityoulikeit:

*Very interesting interview
“Giles Duley has been getting a lot of attention recently as the photographer who lost both his legs and an arm after stepping on a landmine in Kabul while documenting American troops in Afghanistan. Giles has been reluctant to speak about himself and his accident, but it’s the work that he’s been compiling for ten years that I really wanted to talk to him about.”
Read more

FJP: Definitely read more.

Giles Duley Interview

ifilikeityoulikeit:

*Very interesting interview

Giles Duley has been getting a lot of attention recently as the photographer who lost both his legs and an arm after stepping on a landmine in Kabul while documenting American troops in Afghanistan. Giles has been reluctant to speak about himself and his accident, but it’s the work that he’s been compiling for ten years that I really wanted to talk to him about.”

Read more

FJP: Definitely read more.

Six Months

cjchivers:

Today marks a half year since Austin Tice, a law student and former Marine infantry officer, disappeared in Syria. Austin is an independent journalist; he had used his summer break from studies to try his hand at photography and writing, and contributed to multiple news organizations during a period when very few journalists were inside Syria.  No one has acknowledged detaining him. The video showing him in the custody of armed men raises many more questions than answers. His family awaits word, as do the families of other journalists missing in Syria’s civil war, including the family of James Foley. The @FreeAustinTice twitter feed has been revived. Please follow it, and raise your voice to release all the unlawfully detained men and women in Syria, including our friends.

By an Employee of the New York Times in Damascus Syria and Anne Barnard

By an Employee of the New York Times in Damascus Syria and Anne Barnard

Training War Reporters in the Bronx
Last Spring, Sebastien Junger founded Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) in honor of his friend and Restrepo co-director Tim Hetherington’s 2011 death while covering the Libyan revolution. 
With the increase of freelancers covering conflict areas, RISC creates three-day training programs to “equip freelance journalists in all media to treat life-threatening injuries on the battlefield.”
Wired profiles a recent training session that took place in at the Bronx Documentary Center:

The need for medical training among journalists is especially desperate now as news outlets are employing freelancers — many without insurance or institutional support – to deliver stories.
“The industry is closing down bureaus. Increasing we are relying on freelancers for photographs. Look at the images from Syria, almost all of those are by freelancers, many of whom are without medical training or medical kits. It’s a recipe for disaster,” says [Michael] Kamber, who has reported from over a dozen conflict zones during his career and even admits that he was unprepared in the past.
In recent years, the deaths of several photojournalists have reminded us of the extreme dangers faced by reporters in conflict zones. Getty photographer Chris Hondros died in the same mortar explosion as Hetherington; Anton Hammerle was killed by Gaddafi loyalists in April 2011; and Rémi Ochlik died in the bombing of Homs, Syria, in February of this year.

Image: Conflict Training for Reporters, by Katie Khouri, via Wired

Training War Reporters in the Bronx

Last Spring, Sebastien Junger founded Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) in honor of his friend and Restrepo co-director Tim Hetherington’s 2011 death while covering the Libyan revolution. 

With the increase of freelancers covering conflict areas, RISC creates three-day training programs to “equip freelance journalists in all media to treat life-threatening injuries on the battlefield.”

Wired profiles a recent training session that took place in at the Bronx Documentary Center:

The need for medical training among journalists is especially desperate now as news outlets are employing freelancers — many without insurance or institutional support – to deliver stories.

“The industry is closing down bureaus. Increasing we are relying on freelancers for photographs. Look at the images from Syria, almost all of those are by freelancers, many of whom are without medical training or medical kits. It’s a recipe for disaster,” says [Michael] Kamber, who has reported from over a dozen conflict zones during his career and even admits that he was unprepared in the past.

In recent years, the deaths of several photojournalists have reminded us of the extreme dangers faced by reporters in conflict zones. Getty photographer Chris Hondros died in the same mortar explosion as Hetherington; Anton Hammerle was killed by Gaddafi loyalists in April 2011; and Rémi Ochlik died in the bombing of Homs, Syria, in February of this year.

Image: Conflict Training for Reporters, by Katie Khouri, via Wired

Austin Tice, an American freelance journalist in Syria who has not communicated with family and colleagues since mid August, is shown alive and in the custody of armed men in a video posted on YouTube.

In the 47-second clip, headlined “Austin Tice is alive,” Tice is shown blindfolded and disoriented, mangling an Islamic prayer before crying out, “Oh, Jesus.” He is surrounded by masked gunmen who act like militant Islamists, calling out “God is great!” and wearing the baggy traditional outfits of fighters operating in Afghanistan.

The video was posted Sept. 26 but escaped notice until early Monday, when a link to it appeared on a Facebook page that appears to support the Syrian government of President Bashar Assad. Tips and other evidence previously gathered by the news organizations to which Tice contributed has suggested he is in Syrian government custody.