posts about or somewhat related to ‘copywriting’

If Buzzfeed Titled Books

Waterstones asked Twitter how Buzzfeed would title books. The result: 16 #BuzzfeedBooks You Have To Read Before You Die.

Images: Screenshots of Harry Potter, The Inferno and the Bible, via Waterstones.

Someone’s Enjoying This Story
Yesterday’s New York Post.

Someone’s Enjoying This Story

Yesterday’s New York Post.

Thinking Through the Headline

We try to teach each other here at the FJP and our latest learnings look at writing headlines and titles on Tumblr.

While Tumblr specific, I hope this document can also help others who are teaching or trying to learn how to write headlines and titles more generally.

The Google doc is here. You can download the PDF here. — Michael

1+1 = more!
Circa 2005.

1+1 = more!

Circa 2005.

poynterinstitute:

Poynter’s Roy Peter Clark describes how good writing turns crap into a front-page natural: “This is tabloidism at its best, a combination of clever, almost offensive messages, created by a team – photographers, writers, editors, designers — who are, shall we say, on the same page.”

Vive Le Tabloid?

poynterinstitute:

Poynter’s Roy Peter Clark describes how good writing turns crap into a front-page natural: “This is tabloidism at its best, a combination of clever, almost offensive messages, created by a team – photographers, writers, editors, designers — who are, shall we say, on the same page.”

Vive Le Tabloid?

Going for the Rebrand, Maybe Not So Much for the Win
The Newspaper Association of America is out with a new marketing campaign with the ad above being tested in eight markets across the country.
Writing in Editor & Publisher, Gretchen Peck gives the campaign a thumbs up, stating that it tells the story of a dynamic industry that’s “not dead”.
"Literally, everyone at the agency, everyone on our committee, and then everyone on the board had a 100-percent positive reaction to that headline," says Donna Barrett, president and CEO of Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc. about the new “Smart is the new sexy” motto. “It sets a fun new tone for [the industry]. Who doesn’t want to be perceived as both smart and sexy? And if you can tie the two together? All the better!”
But can we get a copy editor in the room?
As Chris Rovzar writes in New York Magazine, the “X is the new Y” construction does not mean that both X and Y still hold. It means Y has been supplanted:

"Smart is the new sexy" means that smart has replaced sexy as… the thing that people want to be? I guess? It doesn’t mean “smart IS sexy.” It means that smart and sexy are two very distinct things that actually can’t co-exist because one’s toppling the other. So you’re deciding to be smart instead of sexy. Which is fine! But not what these people are trying to say.

Maybe the copy editors were canned in a newsroom consolidation.
Source: Editor & Publisher | New York Magazine.

Going for the Rebrand, Maybe Not So Much for the Win

The Newspaper Association of America is out with a new marketing campaign with the ad above being tested in eight markets across the country.

Writing in Editor & Publisher, Gretchen Peck gives the campaign a thumbs up, stating that it tells the story of a dynamic industry that’s “not dead”.

"Literally, everyone at the agency, everyone on our committee, and then everyone on the board had a 100-percent positive reaction to that headline," says Donna Barrett, president and CEO of Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc. about the new “Smart is the new sexy” motto. “It sets a fun new tone for [the industry]. Who doesn’t want to be perceived as both smart and sexy? And if you can tie the two together? All the better!”

But can we get a copy editor in the room?

As Chris Rovzar writes in New York Magazine, the “X is the new Y” construction does not mean that both X and Y still hold. It means Y has been supplanted:

"Smart is the new sexy" means that smart has replaced sexy as… the thing that people want to be? I guess? It doesn’t mean “smart IS sexy.” It means that smart and sexy are two very distinct things that actually can’t co-exist because one’s toppling the other. So you’re deciding to be smart instead of sexy. Which is fine! But not what these people are trying to say.

Maybe the copy editors were canned in a newsroom consolidation.

Source: Editor & Publisher | New York Magazine.

The Grammar of Social Media →

As technology evolves and words become more commonplace, debates emerge about their actual spelling. Blog author Kerry Jones attempts to do something about that:

New words entering common use but not yet part of mainstream language are called neologisms (impress your next dinner party with that one). It can take years before standards are set for a new word, and even then those rules and suggestions may continue changing. For example, within the last year the Associated Press Stylebook made two notable changes to online terms: e-mail is finally email, and Web site is now website (although the former is still acceptable). 

With the addition of “OMG" to the dictionary, it is hard to imagine what the dictionary of the future will look like.