posts about or somewhat related to ‘datajournalism’

Check out this great round up of data driven stories put together by the Guardian.co.uk

Check out this great round up of data driven stories put together by the Guardian.co.uk

It’s called datajournalism, but it isn’t just about slapping a pretty pie chart on a news story. Data journalists weave compelling narratives, often of the investigative variety, using statistics and numbers—and not, say, press statements or interviews—as their primary sources.

— Datajournalism: Reporting the Truth, in Numbers via DesignTaxi.com

(Source: designtaxi.com)

Mexican Drug Wars →

Via the Guardian:

The Mexican government has released a database it says covers all murders presumed to have a link to the country’s drug wars in which at least seven different cartels are fighting each other and federal forces deployed in a massive offensive against them launched in December 2006.

The number of deaths has risen rapidly since then to total 34,612 up until the end of 2010, by far the most violent year so far with 15,273 people killed.

The Guardian created some interactives from the dataset, and is releasing the spreadsheet to the public to see what hackers can do.

This infographic was created for The Times’ (of London) iPad app to illustrate the striking differences in health performance of regions in the North and South of England.

32 different indicators of health are accessed via a navigation wheel, giving access to colour coded maps of England. The profile of each region is accessible either via the map itself or through the navigation wheels at the foot of the page. A traffic light colour code indicates whether a statistic is better than (green), worse than (red) or not significantly different to (yellow) the national average.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Like chocolate and peanut butter, data and journalism naturally go together.

Paul Bradshaw writes at Poynter:

Statistics and numbers in general are nothing new to journalists. When I talk about data I mean information that can be processed by computers.

This is a crucial distinction: It is one thing for a journalist to look at a balance sheet on paper; it is quite another to be able to dig through those figures on a spreadsheet, or to write a programming script to analyse that data, and match it to other sources of information. Computers can also more easily analyse new types of data, such as live data, large amounts of text, user behaviour patterns, and network connections.

And that is potentially transformational. Adding computer processing power to our journalistic arsenal allows us to do more, faster, more accurately, and with others. All of which opens up new opportunities and new dangers. Things are going to change.

Image: Numbers by Luis Argerich via Flickr/Creative Commons.

Like chocolate and peanut butter, data and journalism naturally go together.

Paul Bradshaw writes at Poynter:

Statistics and numbers in general are nothing new to journalists. When I talk about data I mean information that can be processed by computers.

This is a crucial distinction: It is one thing for a journalist to look at a balance sheet on paper; it is quite another to be able to dig through those figures on a spreadsheet, or to write a programming script to analyse that data, and match it to other sources of information. Computers can also more easily analyse new types of data, such as live data, large amounts of text, user behaviour patterns, and network connections.

And that is potentially transformational. Adding computer processing power to our journalistic arsenal allows us to do more, faster, more accurately, and with others. All of which opens up new opportunities and new dangers. Things are going to change.

Image: Numbers by Luis Argerich via Flickr/Creative Commons.