Posts tagged with ‘datavisualization’

Mapping Ebola

Via The New York Times:

Patient Zero in the Ebola outbreak, researchers suspect, was a 2-year-old boy who died on Dec. 6, just a few days after falling ill in a village in Guéckédou, in southeastern Guinea. Bordering Sierra Leone and Liberia, Guéckédou is at the intersection of three nations, where the disease found an easy entry point to the region.

A week later, it killed the boy’s mother, then his 3-year-old sister, then his grandmother. All had fever, vomiting and diarrhea, but no one knew what had sickened them.

Two mourners at the grandmother’s funeral took the virus home to their village. A health worker carried it to still another, where he died, as did his doctor. They both infected relatives from other towns. By the time Ebola was recognized, in March, dozens of people had died in eight Guinean communities, and suspected cases were popping up in Liberia and Sierra Leone…

…Now, with 1,779 cases, including 961 deaths and a small cluster in Nigeria, the outbreak is out of control and still getting worse. Not only is it the largest ever, but it also seems likely to surpass all two dozen previous known Ebola outbreaks combined.

Images: What You Need to Know About the Ebola Oubreak, via The New York Times. Select to embiggen.

A feature length movie is an amazing dataset. You just need to know how to look at it, and you need the right tools.

For his senior project at the Royal Academy of Arts, Den Haag, Frederic Brodbeck created his own software programs that dissembled video files into their constituent parts. In this way he was able to identify elements such as video, audio, subtitles, as well as gathering information average shot length, motion measuring, color palettes and more. 

cinemetrics is about measuring and visualizing movie data, in order to reveal the characteristics of films and to create a visual “fingerprint” for them. Information such as the editing structure, color, speech or motion are extracted, analyzed and transformed into graphic representations so that movies can be seen as a whole and easily interpreted or compared side by side.

Brilliant, my fine friend. Brilliant.

h/t Motionographer

(Source: cinemetrics.fredericbrodbeck.de)

Visualizing UFO Sighting Across the US
Via Flowing Data:

The dataset is 60,000 sightings, but the above shows about 45,000 locations that could be geocoded immediately. The whiter the region, the more sightings there were in the area from 1906 to 2007.

The data is from the National UFO Reporting Center via Infochimps and is visualized in R.
Cue the space music.

Visualizing UFO Sighting Across the US

Via Flowing Data:

The dataset is 60,000 sightings, but the above shows about 45,000 locations that could be geocoded immediately. The whiter the region, the more sightings there were in the area from 1906 to 2007.

The data is from the National UFO Reporting Center via Infochimps and is visualized in R.

Cue the space music.

Earlier this year Google and Eyebeam, an art and technology center, collaborated on a competition for designers and developers to visualize where their US tax dollars go.

Called the Data Viz Challenge, data came from WhatWePayFor.com, criteria was based on Storytelling, Clarity, Relevance, Utility, and Aesthetics, and creativity came from those who got involved.

Anil Kandangath is this year’s winner. You can see what he did here.

The competition’s finalists are located here.

Digital tools help us create incredible datavisualizations and interactives.

Sometimes though, real-life sponges in the shape of maps will do.

Called Can We Keep Up?, the visualization shown here looks at the increase in the urban water usage by 2030. A sponge’s thickness demonstrates a country’s future water needs.

Create by Hal Watts, Matthew Laws and Luke Bennett.

H/T: Infosthetics.

File under: Visualization can teach us things we don’t know about.
Via Power of Data Visualization:

[The] above image looks like a giant potato, but it is actually our Earth. After just two years in orbit, European Space Agency’s GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) satellite has gathered enough data to map Earth’s gravity with unrivalled precision. Scientists now have access to the most accurate model of the ‘geoid’ ever produced to further our understanding of how Earth works.

Takeaway: we’re a mostly lumpy species living on a very lumpy planet.

File under: Visualization can teach us things we don’t know about.

Via Power of Data Visualization:

[The] above image looks like a giant potato, but it is actually our Earth. After just two years in orbit, European Space Agency’s GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) satellite has gathered enough data to map Earth’s gravity with unrivalled precision. Scientists now have access to the most accurate model of the ‘geoid’ ever produced to further our understanding of how Earth works.

Takeaway: we’re a mostly lumpy species living on a very lumpy planet.

Statistics is now the sexiest subject around.

Hans Rosling, professor of international health at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and founder of GapMinder.org, a datavisualization non-profit focussing on issues of global health.

Rosling and his sexy data can be seen in the BBC documentary, The Joy of Stats.

Via Natasha Singer, New York Times, When the Data Struts Its Stuff

History of the World in 100 Seconds

Gareth Lloyd and Tom Martin combed through 424,171 Wikipedia articles, and cross-referenced geographical coordinates and historical events to create this visualization of world history. From them, the two were able to pair up 14,238 events with coordinates.

Via Ragtag.info:

To make it, I built a python SAX Parser that sliced and diced an xml dump of all wikipedia articles (30Gb) and pulled out 424,000 articles with coordinates and 35,000 references to events. We managed to pair up 14,238 events with locations, and Tom wrote some Java to fiddle about with the coordinates and output frames. I’ve hacked around some more to add animation, because, you know, why not?

Why not, indeed.

H/T: Flowing Data.

We don’t know if taxes are as contentious in other countries as they are in the United States but Google and the non-profit art and technology center Eyebeam have teamed up to offer a $10,000 challenge for a visualization of how personal taxes are spent here.
Called DataVizChallenge, the competition runs until March 27 and provides data from WhatWePayFor.com. 
Should you enter, be sure to include a little bit about how military’s marching band budget is greater than that for public broadcasting.
Samples and examples are here.

We don’t know if taxes are as contentious in other countries as they are in the United States but Google and the non-profit art and technology center Eyebeam have teamed up to offer a $10,000 challenge for a visualization of how personal taxes are spent here.

Called DataVizChallenge, the competition runs until March 27 and provides data from WhatWePayFor.com

Should you enter, be sure to include a little bit about how military’s marching band budget is greater than that for public broadcasting.

Samples and examples are here.

Visualizing a social graph with Fizz, a playful release by the visualization group Bloom.

From Fizz you’re asked to connect to either Facebook or Twitter (in the video we chose Twitter), and then, as you can see, your Twitter stream starts to emerge as clustered bubbles.

Each enclosed bubble is a single user. Select a circle and see what people are saying.

Soundtrack not included.

If you’re a baseball junky you’ll love Pennant, an iPad app that visualizes every play from every Major League baseball game played since 1951. 

The app was created by Steve Varga for his Master’s of Fine Arts in Design and Technology thesis at Parsons in NYC.

The past century has seen a rapid progression in the way we see and experience live sports. As we now find ourselves with access to every live game detail imaginable across a multitude of devices, we must now ask ourselves the question “Where does all of this information go?” Pennant is both an attempt to explore the vast amount of baseball data that has been collected in the last sixty years as well as a study in using interactivity as a means for investigating the extremely large data sets that are becoming increasingly available.

Baseball not quite your thing? Think of this as a prototype of what could be done with deep data sets such as those coming out of the Open Gov movement.

Visualizing word frequency in the New York Times, 1981 - 2010. Via Jer Thorpe (blog | Flickr). 

Visualizing word frequency in the New York Times, 1981 - 2010. Via Jer Thorpe (blog | Flickr). 

See this animation? It’s made with a global life expectancy data set from the World bank that’s been imported into Google’s Public Data Explorer

Google’s been working on the Data Explorer ever since it acquired Gapminder and its Trendalyzer software. So far, visualizations like these have been created with Google’s in-house team. But not so anymore. They’ve released a Web interface for data journalists, academics and others with large data sets to upload their info and start visualizing.

Reports Nieman Lab:

[Benjamin] Yolken and Omar Benjelloun, Google Public Data’s tech lead, have written a new data format, the Dataset Publishing Language (DSPL), an XML-based format designed particularly to support animated visualizations. “DSPL is like those in the Public Data Explorer,” Benjelloun notes in a blog post announcing the opening. “We’ve been using DSPL internally to produce all of the datasets and visualizations in the product”; now, he writes, “you can now use it to upload and visualize your own DSPL-formatted datasets in your own applications.”

It’s an experimental feature that, like the Public Data Explorer itself — not to mention some of Google’s most fun features (Google Scribe, Google Body, Google Books’ Ngrams viewer, etc.) — lives under the Google Labs umbrella. And, importantly, it’s a feature, Yolken notes, that “allows users who may or may not have technical expertise to explore, visually, a number of public data sets.”

The newly open tool could be particularly useful for news organizations that would like to get into the dataviz game, but who don’t have the resources — of time, of talent, of money — to invest in proprietary systems. 

Good times.

Traditional organization charts look like pyramids. The boss is on top, followed by some executives, then middle managers and then an army of worker bots filling out the base.
Translate that to the traditional newsroom and you have a publisher on top, some editors on one side with writers, producers and other bots beneath them; and business and ad sales people on the other with a nice wall between the two sides to keep everything kosher.
But say your first name’s Walt, last name’s Disney, the year’s 1943 and you’re trying to come up with a new way to organize your five-year-old business. Solution: you create a new organizational structure that follows a completely different form. It’s circular, it’s inclusive, it looks more like a connected ecosystem than a traditional pyramid. (And a biggie version can be seen here.)
Can the new newsroom learn from Disney’s innovation?
Besides the traditional players we add technologists and — most importantly — audience. How do we incorporate those that interact with, share, promote and otherwise have at it with our content? How and where do we bring them into this inclusive circle?
Final question: if you were creating your new newsroom, what would your org chart look like?

Traditional organization charts look like pyramids. The boss is on top, followed by some executives, then middle managers and then an army of worker bots filling out the base.

Translate that to the traditional newsroom and you have a publisher on top, some editors on one side with writers, producers and other bots beneath them; and business and ad sales people on the other with a nice wall between the two sides to keep everything kosher.

But say your first name’s Walt, last name’s Disney, the year’s 1943 and you’re trying to come up with a new way to organize your five-year-old business. Solution: you create a new organizational structure that follows a completely different form. It’s circular, it’s inclusive, it looks more like a connected ecosystem than a traditional pyramid. (And a biggie version can be seen here.)

Can the new newsroom learn from Disney’s innovation?

Besides the traditional players we add technologists and — most importantly — audience. How do we incorporate those that interact with, share, promote and otherwise have at it with our content? How and where do we bring them into this inclusive circle?

Final question: if you were creating your new newsroom, what would your org chart look like?