Posts tagged demographics

Age Distribution on Social Networks
Image: By Pingdom with data from Google Ad Planner via Bit Rebels. Select to embiggen.

Age Distribution on Social Networks

Image: By Pingdom with data from Google Ad Planner via Bit Rebels. Select to embiggen.

Red v Blue, Not So True

Via Chris Howard:

America really looks like this - I was looking at the amazing 2012 election maps created by Mark Newman (Department of Physics and Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan), and although there is a very interesting blended voting map (Most of the country is some shade of purple, a varied blend of Democrat blue and Republican red) what I really wanted was this blended map with a population density overlay. Because what really stands out is how red the nation seems to be when you do not take the voting population into account; when you do so many of those vast red mid-west blocks fade into pale pink and lavender (very low population).

So I created a new map using Mark’s blended voting map based on the actual numbers of votes for each party overlaid with population maps from Texas Tech University and other sources.

Here’s the result — what the American political voting distribution really looks like.

Images: Chris Howard’s “blended” voting map, via Facebook (top); Mark Newman’s 2012 voting maps by state, county and percentage vote by county (bottom). Select to embiggen.

A Politico headline: “GOP soul-searching: ‘Too old, too white, too male?’”

Around noon Wednesday, I started hearing a voice inside my election-addled head: Where else had I seen numbers like these? Where had I heard that Politico description? Who else was getting a really good market share of a smaller and smaller slice of the population?

Ah, yes: the newspaper industry.
Big Data, Demographics and the Undiscovered Voter
The New York Times has a great piece on the final six weeks of the presidential campaign.
There’s a lot in there in terms of strategies, momentum and setbacks but the use of data and demographics is eye opening:

In Chicago, the [Obama] campaign recruited a team of behavioral scientists to build an extraordinarily sophisticated database packed with names of millions of undecided voters and potential supporters. The ever-expanding list let the campaign find and register new voters who fit the demographic pattern of Obama backers and methodically track their views through thousands of telephone calls every night.
That allowed the Obama campaign not only to alter the very nature of the electorate, making it younger and less white, but also to create a portrait of shifting voter allegiances. The power of this operation stunned Mr. Romney’s aides on election night, as they saw voters they never even knew existed turn out in places like Osceola County, Fla. “It’s one thing to say you are going to do it; it’s another thing to actually get out there and do it,” said Brian Jones, a senior adviser.

New York Times, How a Race in the Balance Went to Obama.
Image: An Obama victory party in Manchester, NH, via the New York Times.

Big Data, Demographics and the Undiscovered Voter

The New York Times has a great piece on the final six weeks of the presidential campaign.

There’s a lot in there in terms of strategies, momentum and setbacks but the use of data and demographics is eye opening:

In Chicago, the [Obama] campaign recruited a team of behavioral scientists to build an extraordinarily sophisticated database packed with names of millions of undecided voters and potential supporters. The ever-expanding list let the campaign find and register new voters who fit the demographic pattern of Obama backers and methodically track their views through thousands of telephone calls every night.

That allowed the Obama campaign not only to alter the very nature of the electorate, making it younger and less white, but also to create a portrait of shifting voter allegiances. The power of this operation stunned Mr. Romney’s aides on election night, as they saw voters they never even knew existed turn out in places like Osceola County, Fla. “It’s one thing to say you are going to do it; it’s another thing to actually get out there and do it,” said Brian Jones, a senior adviser.

New York Times, How a Race in the Balance Went to Obama.

Image: An Obama victory party in Manchester, NH, via the New York Times.

Newsroom Diversity, or Lack Thereof
Mainstream news organizations have long fallen short in reflecting the communities they serve. In an analysis of who’s writing front page stories for major publications, 4thEstate shows that 2012 political coverage is dominated by white reporters.
Via 4thEstate:

The latest in our infographic series shows that over 93% of front page print articles, covering the 2012 Presidential Election, were written by white reporters. The percentage of articles written by Asian American reporters is 4%, by African American reporters is 2.1%, and by Hispanic reporters is 0.9%. This under-representation of minorities reporting on the front page holds true across most media outlets for most ethnic groups. The Dallas Morning News stands out as an exception where 18.8% of their front page stories were written by African Americans. The most striking under-representation of minorities in our data is that of Hispanic journalists, considering the Hispanic population stands at approximately 16.3% of the U.S. population (according to the 2010 Census). At six point one percent (6.1%), The Miami Herald has the highest percentage of front page stories written by Hispanics. The Boston Globe had the highest percentage of front page articles written by Asian Americans at 11.5%.

And if you think demographic balance might find its way onto the opinion pages, think again. Earlier this year, Erika Fry examined opinion page diversity in the Columbia Journalism Review:

Women wrote 20 percent of op-eds in the nation’s leading newspapers—The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and The Wall Street Journal—between September 15 and December 7, 2011, according to a byline survey conducted by Taryn Yaeger of The OpEd Project, an organization that aims to diversify public debate…
…Though harder to track, statistics on racial, ethnic, and class diversity on opinion pages are just as jarring. A similar three-month byline survey, released in April by Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), showed one-half of one percent of op-eds in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were written by Latinos; in The Washington Post, it was 0 percent. Asian Americans authored an average of 2 percent; blacks roughly 5 percent (though that rate was lifted by the Post’s 10 percent).

Image: Newsroom Diversity, by 4thEstate. Select to embiggen.

Newsroom Diversity, or Lack Thereof

Mainstream news organizations have long fallen short in reflecting the communities they serve. In an analysis of who’s writing front page stories for major publications, 4thEstate shows that 2012 political coverage is dominated by white reporters.

Via 4thEstate:

The latest in our infographic series shows that over 93% of front page print articles, covering the 2012 Presidential Election, were written by white reporters. The percentage of articles written by Asian American reporters is 4%, by African American reporters is 2.1%, and by Hispanic reporters is 0.9%. This under-representation of minorities reporting on the front page holds true across most media outlets for most ethnic groups. The Dallas Morning News stands out as an exception where 18.8% of their front page stories were written by African Americans. The most striking under-representation of minorities in our data is that of Hispanic journalists, considering the Hispanic population stands at approximately 16.3% of the U.S. population (according to the 2010 Census). At six point one percent (6.1%), The Miami Herald has the highest percentage of front page stories written by Hispanics. The Boston Globe had the highest percentage of front page articles written by Asian Americans at 11.5%.

And if you think demographic balance might find its way onto the opinion pages, think again. Earlier this year, Erika Fry examined opinion page diversity in the Columbia Journalism Review:

Women wrote 20 percent of op-eds in the nation’s leading newspapers—The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and The Wall Street Journal—between September 15 and December 7, 2011, according to a byline survey conducted by Taryn Yaeger of The OpEd Project, an organization that aims to diversify public debate…

…Though harder to track, statistics on racial, ethnic, and class diversity on opinion pages are just as jarring. A similar three-month byline survey, released in April by Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), showed one-half of one percent of op-eds in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were written by Latinos; in The Washington Post, it was 0 percent. Asian Americans authored an average of 2 percent; blacks roughly 5 percent (though that rate was lifted by the Post’s 10 percent).

Image: Newsroom Diversity, by 4thEstate. Select to embiggen.

US Life Expectancy by County, 1989 and 2009

Via the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation:

IHME analyzed new mortality data by age, sex, and county for the US from 1989 to 2009. Across US counties, life expectancy in 2009 ranged from 66.1 to 81.6 years for men and 73.5 to 86.0 years for women. From 1989 to 2009, life expectancy for men improved by 4.6 years on average but only by 2.7 years for women. And throughout the country, women were more likely than men to have no progress in life expectancy or to have their lifespans get shorter over time.

In 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999. By comparison, life expectancy for men stopped or reversed in 166 counties. This troubling trend is occurring in 84% of Oklahoma counties, 58% of Tennessee counties, and 33% of Georgia counties.

The gap between women living the longest lives and those living the shortest lives is growing, too. In Collier, Florida, women live 85.8 years on average. In McDowell, West Virginia, they live to be 74.1. That’s an 11.7-year gap. In 1989, the gap was 8.7 years. For men, the gap is larger – 15.5 years – but it has grown by less than a year since 1989. Men live the longest in Marin, California, at 81.6 years. They live the shortest lives on average in Quitman and Tunica, Mississippi, at 66.1.

The range of life expectancies is so broad that in some counties, such as Stearns, Minnesota, lifespans rival some of the places where people live the longest – Japan, Hong Kong, and France – while in other counties, life expectancies are lower than places that spend far less on health care – Egypt, Indonesia, and Colombia. Even within states, there are large disparities. Women in Fairfax, Virginia, have among the best life expectancies in the world at 84.1 years, while in Sussex, Virginia, they have among the worst at 75.9 years.

At the same time, the life expectancy gap between black Americans and white Americans is closing. In 1989, black men could expect to live to be 63.8 on average, while white men had an average lifespan of 72.5, a difference of 8.7 years. In 2009, black male life expectancy improved by nearly a decade to 71.2 years, and white male life expectancy improved at a slower rate to 76.7 years, a 5.5-year gap. The gap between black women and white women is even narrower: 3.6 years. Black women on average in 2009 had a life expectancy of 77.9 years, compared to 81.5 years for white women.

Images: Screenshots, Life expectancy by county and sex (US), 1989-2009. Top, 1989. Bottom, 2009. Via IHME.

Where the iPad Roams (US Edition)
Chitika, an online advertising network, has tracked where millions of new iPads are being activated. 
By mapping their data with US demographic data, they show the luxury tablet remains in wealthier states.
As GigaOm points out, the same holds true for iPad and iPhone penetration in China. Wealthy coastal and industrial areas adopt the devices. The rest of the country? Not so much.
Image: iPad adoption by state, via Chitika Labs.

Where the iPad Roams (US Edition)

Chitika, an online advertising network, has tracked where millions of new iPads are being activated. 

By mapping their data with US demographic data, they show the luxury tablet remains in wealthier states.

As GigaOm points out, the same holds true for iPad and iPhone penetration in China. Wealthy coastal and industrial areas adopt the devices. The rest of the country? Not so much.

Image: iPad adoption by state, via Chitika Labs.

Exploring Diversity at NPR

In an honest look in the mirror, NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos explores its newsroom and audience:

To see if Latino, black and Asian listeners find programming that appeals to them, I broke down NPR audience figures by higher education and income. I discovered that within these categories, the levels of representation of the minority groups and whites are not far apart. Minority staffing in the newsroom and on air, meanwhile, continues to improve. NPR does significantly better than the industry averages in radio, television and newspapers. But then, we expect NPR to do better…

…But I do have a… caveat. To look at race and ethnicity does not mean that I believe NPR should write any goals into stone. Race and ethnicity still matter in America, but less as time goes by. I used to teach immigration policy at Harvard, and that background tells me that the United States is the single most successful example in world history of a multi-racial and multi-ethnic society. Sociologists and market researchers today have identified what some call “a new mainstream” in which the educated and the young identify with each other more than with their ethnic and racial roots, though the roots don’t disappear.

Read through for the details.

The United Nations gives a loose estimate that the world population will hit seven billion people sometime in the next few days.
It wasn’t so long ago that we hit six billion, and looking back 60 years global population was 2.5 billion.
At the Wall Street Journal, William McGun writes that added mouths to feed shouldn’t concern us. Instead, he suggests, we should look at the human potential among us:

At Columbia University’s Earth Institute, Prof. Jeffrey Sachs tells CNN “the consequences for humanity could be grim.” Earlier this year, a New York Times columnist declared “the earth is full,” suggesting that a growing population means “we are eating into our future.” And in West Virginia, the Charleston Gazette editorializes about a “human swarm” that is “overbreeding” in a way that “prosperous, well-educated families” from the developed world do not.
The smarter ones acknowledge that Malthus’s ominous warnings about a growing population outstripping the food supply were not borne out in his day. The track record for these scares in our own day is not much better. Perhaps the most famous was Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 “The Population Bomb,” which opened with these sunny sentences: “The battle to feed all humanity is over. In the 1970s, the world will undergo famines—hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now.”…
…The truth is that the main flaw in Malthus is precisely his premise. Malthusian fears about population follow from the Malthusian view that human beings are primarily mouths to be fed rather than minds to be unlocked. In this reasoning, when a pig is born in China, the national wealth is thought to go up, but when a Chinese baby is born the national wealth goes down.

Thoughts?

The United Nations gives a loose estimate that the world population will hit seven billion people sometime in the next few days.

It wasn’t so long ago that we hit six billion, and looking back 60 years global population was 2.5 billion.

At the Wall Street Journal, William McGun writes that added mouths to feed shouldn’t concern us. Instead, he suggests, we should look at the human potential among us:

At Columbia University’s Earth Institute, Prof. Jeffrey Sachs tells CNN “the consequences for humanity could be grim.” Earlier this year, a New York Times columnist declared “the earth is full,” suggesting that a growing population means “we are eating into our future.” And in West Virginia, the Charleston Gazette editorializes about a “human swarm” that is “overbreeding” in a way that “prosperous, well-educated families” from the developed world do not.

The smarter ones acknowledge that Malthus’s ominous warnings about a growing population outstripping the food supply were not borne out in his day. The track record for these scares in our own day is not much better. Perhaps the most famous was Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 “The Population Bomb,” which opened with these sunny sentences: “The battle to feed all humanity is over. In the 1970s, the world will undergo famines—hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now.”…

…The truth is that the main flaw in Malthus is precisely his premise. Malthusian fears about population follow from the Malthusian view that human beings are primarily mouths to be fed rather than minds to be unlocked. In this reasoning, when a pig is born in China, the national wealth is thought to go up, but when a Chinese baby is born the national wealth goes down.

Thoughts?

If you’re an 18-29 year old black or hispanic woman with some high school education, and living in a household that makes under $30 thousand a year, you’re most likely a texting machine. (Select image to embiggen.)
The Pew Internet and American Life Project study on Americans and Text Messages finds young adults in general have mighty thumbs:

18-24 year olds send or receive an average of 109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts per day (or around 1,500 messages per month).
One quarter of 18-24 year old text messaging users (23%) report sending or receiving more than 100 texts per day.
Just over one in ten (12%) say that they send or receive more than 200 messages on an average day—that equals 6,000 or more messages per month.

Image: Pew Internet and American Life Study via Flowing Data.

If you’re an 18-29 year old black or hispanic woman with some high school education, and living in a household that makes under $30 thousand a year, you’re most likely a texting machine. (Select image to embiggen.)

The Pew Internet and American Life Project study on Americans and Text Messages finds young adults in general have mighty thumbs:

  • 18-24 year olds send or receive an average of 109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts per day (or around 1,500 messages per month).
  • One quarter of 18-24 year old text messaging users (23%) report sending or receiving more than 100 texts per day.
  • Just over one in ten (12%) say that they send or receive more than 200 messages on an average day—that equals 6,000 or more messages per month.

Image: Pew Internet and American Life Study via Flowing Data.

Hunch, the psycho-social graph engine that attempts to customize the web around your tastes, collects a lot of data. It has to in order to do what it sets out to do.
And so, when you sign up Hunch suggests you answer questions about your tastes and other assorted proclivities that it can use to customize the Web just for you.
A lot of people do just that. The image above is a detail of a larger infographic that pulls together 388,315 answers to “Are You A Mac Person or a PC Person.”
Found amongst the answers: Mac owners are younger, more urban and more liberal than their PC counterparts; PC people like to “fit in” more and throw less parties; and PC people prefer impressionist art while Mac people prefer modern.
Click through for more details.

Hunch, the psycho-social graph engine that attempts to customize the web around your tastes, collects a lot of data. It has to in order to do what it sets out to do.

And so, when you sign up Hunch suggests you answer questions about your tastes and other assorted proclivities that it can use to customize the Web just for you.

A lot of people do just that. The image above is a detail of a larger infographic that pulls together 388,315 answers to “Are You A Mac Person or a PC Person.”

Found amongst the answers: Mac owners are younger, more urban and more liberal than their PC counterparts; PC people like to “fit in” more and throw less parties; and PC people prefer impressionist art while Mac people prefer modern.

Click through for more details.

Journalists of Color Decline for 3rd Year

Via Maynard Institute:

U.S. “Minority” Population at 46%; in Newsrooms, 12.79%

The number of journalists of color in daily newspaper and online-only  newsrooms declined for the third consecutive year, the American Society of News Editors reported Thursday in disclosing the results of its annual diversity survey…

…The decline in journalists of color contrasts with the news industry’s stated goal of parity with the number of people of color in the general population by 2025, and as demographic changes show the nation heading toward majority-minority status.

Cartogram of Global Muslim Population
Created from a dataset from the Guardian Datastore.
The Economist has an interesting story about it.

Cartogram of Global Muslim Population

Created from a dataset from the Guardian Datastore.

The Economist has an interesting story about it.

wedia:

TV and newspapers decline, radio remains stable, as Internet continues to rise as public’s main news source. From January 4, 2011 PEW study.

Nicely done.

wedia:

TV and newspapers decline, radio remains stable, as Internet continues to rise as public’s main news source. From January 4, 2011 PEW study.

Nicely done.