posts about or somewhat related to ‘development’

Your Solar Powered Laptop
Via David Snir:

A month ago we revealed SOL to the world. SOL is a solar laptop that runs on Linux. It runs on direct sunlight! Free Software & Free energy. SOL is rugged, waterproof and very affordable at $350-$400. It was created to enhance education in developing countries. SOL is first launching in Ghana this month…
A lot (A LOT haha) of people have asked a few question about SOL - so here’s one image that answers two: Yes, SOL will come in various colors (shown here is SOL Black Mamba model) and Yes, there are 4 PV panel powering the unit.
SOL’s website (www.solaptop.com) will be updated next week - We’ve promised to the community product specifications, better product views and prices and you will have those coming in the website’s update.

Image: The Black Mamba Laptop, via SOL. Select to embiggen.

Your Solar Powered Laptop

Via David Snir:

A month ago we revealed SOL to the world. SOL is a solar laptop that runs on Linux. It runs on direct sunlight! Free Software & Free energy. SOL is rugged, waterproof and very affordable at $350-$400. It was created to enhance education in developing countries. SOL is first launching in Ghana this month…

A lot (A LOT haha) of people have asked a few question about SOL - so here’s one image that answers two: Yes, SOL will come in various colors (shown here is SOL Black Mamba model) and Yes, there are 4 PV panel powering the unit.

SOL’s website (www.solaptop.com) will be updated next week - We’ve promised to the community product specifications, better product views and prices and you will have those coming in the website’s update.

Image: The Black Mamba Laptop, via SOL. Select to embiggen.

Tools Developers Like
Via ReadWriteWeb:

The folks at BestVendor.com interviewed 500 developers and compiled this profile of the tools that they actually use. A few stalwarts, such as Git, Eclipse, AWS, Dropbox, MySQL, and Google Analytics. But a few surprises too, including 23% use Notepad++ as their text editor and 8% using Heroku for hosting their apps.

Image: Detail from “The Developer’s Toolkit”. Click through for the whole shebang. 

Tools Developers Like

Via ReadWriteWeb:

The folks at BestVendor.com interviewed 500 developers and compiled this profile of the tools that they actually use. A few stalwarts, such as Git, Eclipse, AWS, Dropbox, MySQL, and Google Analytics. But a few surprises too, including 23% use Notepad++ as their text editor and 8% using Heroku for hosting their apps.

Image: Detail from “The Developer’s Toolkit”. Click through for the whole shebang. 

The early mistake I made in WordPress development was trying to do it all myself, even though it was an Open Source project. In the WordPress community a consistent theme has been that the more people contribute their best work the better the end product is, and my primary job is just to get out of the way. It took me a while to learn that, but now it’s ingrained.

— Matt Mullenweg, Founder, WordPress. The future of WordPress: Q&A with founder Matt Mullenweg.

It’s Competition Time
Global Pulse, a United Nation’s initiative focusing on real-time data and analysis, is teaming up with Visualizing.org on a contest that tries to understand how populations are managing the global economic crisis.
Called “Giving Voice to the Vulnerable through Data and Design,” the challenge provides survey data from Uganda, Iraq, Ukraine, India and Mexico.
Via Global Pulse:

Last year, Global Pulse launched a large-scale mobile phone based survey to ask people from 5 countries in different regions of the world how they are dealing with the effects of the global economic crisis. 
Based on the survey results, we’re looking for clear, informative, and creative visualizations that tackle one or more of the following: How do people in different nations describe their quality of life? What types of changes do people make in order to cope with economic uncertainty? How to individuals perceive their future outlook?
This first data visualization challenge from UN Global Pulse is a testing ground for a global experiment in giving voice to vulnerable populations and making real-time data actionable.

The competition deadline is July 25, 2011 with winners announced in August.
Details here.

It’s Competition Time

Global Pulse, a United Nation’s initiative focusing on real-time data and analysis, is teaming up with Visualizing.org on a contest that tries to understand how populations are managing the global economic crisis.

Called “Giving Voice to the Vulnerable through Data and Design,” the challenge provides survey data from Uganda, Iraq, Ukraine, India and Mexico.

Via Global Pulse:

Last year, Global Pulse launched a large-scale mobile phone based survey to ask people from 5 countries in different regions of the world how they are dealing with the effects of the global economic crisis. 

Based on the survey results, we’re looking for clear, informative, and creative visualizations that tackle one or more of the following: How do people in different nations describe their quality of life? What types of changes do people make in order to cope with economic uncertainty? How to individuals perceive their future outlook?

This first data visualization challenge from UN Global Pulse is a testing ground for a global experiment in giving voice to vulnerable populations and making real-time data actionable.

The competition deadline is July 25, 2011 with winners announced in August.

Details here.

Nick Kristof

—Nick Kristof

Nick Kristof on Story Telling & Development

New York Times columnist Nick Kristof visits the Center for Global Development to talk about his reporting, his recent book and how he tries to use both to draw attention to issues in the developing world.

Run Time: ~20:00 | Download (Right / CRTL Click)

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.
The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.
The Argument: 

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…
…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.
It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”. 

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.

The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.

The Argument:

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…

…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.

It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”.

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry