Posts tagged with ‘drupal’

It’s the bane of every community editor: the wack-a-mole trolls who won’t go away. Ban them and they re-register to flame another day.
There’s relief though. If you use Drupal, Daniel Braksator released a module called Misery. What does it do? Makes life miserably for certain users. How does it do it? Let us count the ways:
Delay: Create a random-length delay, giving the appearance of a slow connection. 
White screen: Present the user with a white-screen. 
Wrong page: Redirect to a random URL in a predefined list. 
Random node: Redirect to a random node accessible by the user. 
403 Access Denied: Present the user with an “Access Denied” error. 
404 Not Found: Present the user with a “Not Found” error. 
Forms don’t submit: Redirect back to the form during validation to prevent submission. 
Crash IE6: If the user is using Internet Explorer 6, this will crash their browser.
Want to inflict other miseries? Like all good modules, there are hooks for that.

It’s the bane of every community editor: the wack-a-mole trolls who won’t go away. Ban them and they re-register to flame another day.

There’s relief though. If you use Drupal, Daniel Braksator released a module called Misery. What does it do? Makes life miserably for certain users. How does it do it? Let us count the ways:

  • Delay: Create a random-length delay, giving the appearance of a slow connection.
  • White screen: Present the user with a white-screen.
  • Wrong page: Redirect to a random URL in a predefined list.
  • Random node: Redirect to a random node accessible by the user.
  • 403 Access Denied: Present the user with an “Access Denied” error.
  • 404 Not Found: Present the user with a “Not Found” error.
  • Forms don’t submit: Redirect back to the form during validation to prevent submission.
  • Crash IE6: If the user is using Internet Explorer 6, this will crash their browser.

Want to inflict other miseries? Like all good modules, there are hooks for that.

Anonymous asked: Seeking your insights into why you chose Tumblr over Wordpress. I'm considering the same move but would like to know more on your decision.

Tough question: you’re asking how we chose between two flavors of awesome.

Here’s a bit of what our needs were/are and our thinking.

In November we decided to launch a blog to get word out about the Future Journalism Project; curate ideas and themes we came across in our research and interviews; and interact with others who are both concerned with and excited by changes taking place in American news media.

To engage publicly we needed a platform to do so. Twitter was a starting point and we post away at @futureJproject.

As said above though, we wanted to curate ideas so needed something that allowed for something more substantial than 140 characters. We could have installed WordPress, Drupal or Expression Engine but that’s overkill for where we are in the project. More importantly, it wouldn’t immediately connect us with a community.

So we looked at hosted solutions and online communities. Facebook was a thought. It’s obviously an easy place to set up a page and post links and such to it like we do here. But it doesn’t paginate, which we like. And it’s Facebook, which with its shifting user agreements and privacy issues we don’t particularly like. With that caveat aside, we will do something there in the upcoming months. It’s simply too big a gorilla to ignore.

WordPress.com was thought about but involves a level of complexity around posting that we didn’t need. Not that it’s difficult to post, just that it takes a few minutes longer than on Tumblr or Posterous. Also, while you can subscribe to blogs, much like you can follow blogs on Tumblr, and like posts, much like you can heart them on Tumblr, and even reblog posts just like you do here at Tumblr, the vibe isn’t as intimate as Tumblr’s.

Put another way, it’s a User Experience thing.

Tumblr positions community as the primary medium with tools given to members to share content with one another. The User Interface of the Dashboard (ie., post a photo, post a link, post a video, etc.) more or less keeps published items short and sweet.

WordPress.com positions publishing as the primary medium with tools given to create some community. The User Interface of its Dashboard suggests creating longer articles and posts.

Since long articles and other content management complexity wasn’t a concern, we went with community. When we do need a more “sophisticated” platform, we’ll still Tumble.

Here are a few reasons why:

We can’t be all happiness and rainbows though. What do we dislike about and/or think could be improved?

For one, some mechanism for back channel conversation. For others, check this lengthy list over on Quora.

Like we said up top though, you’re asking why we chose between two flavors of awesome.

It’s not an either/or proposition. For us it will be both/and… or we should say, we’ll be using a self-hosted WordPress multisite install when the time comes. Right now though, Tumblr accomplishes — and accomplishes very well — everything we need.

What's New in Drupal 7 →

Publishers using Drupal should like what they see with the release of Drupal 7.0.

So too in-house developers responsible for maintaining, upgrading and expanding the CMS to meet publishing goals.

From what we’ve seen so far, the administration interface received a much needed overhaul, common modules such as CCK are included and, importantly, it’s taken a giant step toward the semantic web by incorporating the Resource Description Framework (RDF), a suite of specifications for defining and understanding content metadata.

Nettuts+ gives an overview. Drupal.org gives the details.

A nifty new iPhone app from the French firm breek.fr helps those using Drupal as their Content Management System, uh, manage their content while on the go.
As explained by Brad Flora over on MediaShift:

Drupad (currenty $4.99 in the iPhone app store), is an iPhone app that lets anyone running a Drupal 6 site read and moderate the latest comments, content, and user sign-ups from their iPhone…
…While Drupad is in not aimed specifically at community news publishers, I believe any publisher running a Drupal 6 site who installs it will immediately find it indispensable.

Read Brad’s review for three reasons why Drupad could be your indispensable mobile Drupal tool.

A nifty new iPhone app from the French firm breek.fr helps those using Drupal as their Content Management System, uh, manage their content while on the go.

As explained by Brad Flora over on MediaShift:

Drupad (currenty $4.99 in the iPhone app store), is an iPhone app that lets anyone running a Drupal 6 site read and moderate the latest comments, content, and user sign-ups from their iPhone…

…While Drupad is in not aimed specifically at community news publishers, I believe any publisher running a Drupal 6 site who installs it will immediately find it indispensable.

Read Brad’s review for three reasons why Drupad could be your indispensable mobile Drupal tool.