posts about or somewhat related to ‘editors’

Associate Animals Editor at BuzzFeed in New York, NY →

One of you intrepid reporters is applying for this, yes?

Here’s what your day would like like:

  • Scour the web looking for content to post to BuzzFeed.com
  • Create original, highly shareable lists, posts, and articles about cute animals 
  • Help run the Animals social media accounts with style and verve

For other BuzzFeed jobs, check here. There’re a bunch.

Silly Season Stories

Selected panels from Brian McFadden’s The Strip. New York Times.

Bonus: Read Jihii’s post on why slow news cycles lead to hyped scandals.

Select images to embiggen.

From Editor to Curator: How to Generate Engaging Content

Jenny Rooney, editor of Forbes CMO Network, discusses her evolving role as an editor-curator in the digital age. She has previously covered interactive advertising for Advertising Age, marketing for Business 2.0, and been editor at Chief Executive magazine and Sales & Marketing Magazine. 

Great content, like a great product, is still the essential ingredient for audience-building. But how can we broaden the conversations around it when we have less control over who produces content? Here, Rooney explains her work at Forbes, which largely centers on finding and bringing novel, innovative, expert voices into the conversation and providing them with the publishing tools to engage an audience.

Bonus: She offers tips for recent grads interested in journalism.

In Which Editors Become Brand-Managers →

Click through to read John Koblin’s piece on the new role editors have had to take on as magazines develop into multi-platform brands. Highlights below.

Some aren’t worried.

Everyone at Condé Nast is supportive of the most important thing — editorial freedom and independence — and, at the same time, I know that financial health is essential and so is getting our work to new readers through new technologies. Still, I don’t much love the talk of ‘brand’ and ‘brand managers’ — I prefer ‘the magazine’ and ‘editors.’ Harold Ross used to talk about The New Yorker as a cause and that’s what it is for me and for all of my colleagues.

-David Remnick, Editor, The New Yorker

Some are a bit worried.

Journalism, photography, design, creative thinking, editing and packaging, they’re what drive it all; they require a great deal of care, thought and attention, and I don’t hear a lot about them these days. What I hear is ‘That’s great for the brand.’ No, that is the brand!

-Jim Nelson, Editor-in-Chief, GQ

The consensus: This isn’t a bad problem to have.

Even though it can be annoying to hear magazines talked about as brands — because magazines themselves are fantastic creatures and brands sounds a little more homogenized — they are brands. I’m just a big believer in a good editor to understand his or her reader and their needs better than anyone. I like the future of a magazine industry that puts editors in charge of directing their brands in partnership with publishers. Would any of us really want a world that those decisions are being completely made by people who are not relating to our readers?

Cindy Leive, Editor-in-Chief, Glamour

FJP: I’d like to pull a different question out of this debate, one related to a comment Nelson made when interviewed. He argued that editorial work suffers on account of the meetings that distract from it.

Meantime, magazine making? It’s become an assumption that that’s the easy part of your day; you’ve got that covered. But it has never been easy, and the day you take your focus off it is the day the magazine becomes less interesting. So yeah, I worry about ADD, about being spread too thin, absolutely. And sometimes I think we’re pushed to do too much with too little. And I’m concerned about stress levels, for quality-of-life and quality-of-job reasons but also because, crucially, you need mental space for creativity and excellence.

Mental space for creativity and excellence. I’m instantly reminded of a Digiday piece I read yesterday, on whether privacy or collaboration better fosters creativity. It referenced an earlier NY Times opinion on the same topic, in which Susan Cain wrote, 

Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption.

Now this isn’t completely related to the editor-turned-brand-manager dilemma, but it is some interesting food for thought. I think Nelson’s point about needing mental space for creativity and excellence warrants a lot of attention. That allotting time for non-editorial endeavors is crucial for the financial health of a publication is indisputable. But I do wonder what steps publications are taking to nurture the creative health of their content.
—Jihii

All great editors are passionate and a little control-freaky about their product.

John Heilemann (via nusca)

I think we’ve known one or a few of these.


Most Major Newspaper Editors Don’t Even Use Twitter
Thanks to Jim Romenesko, who went and looked at the the ten editors of America’s ten largest newspapers, and what they’re doing on the Twitter.
Four of the ten appear to have no Twitter account whatsoever.
Three others have accounts that are secret or inactive.
Two others have not tweeted since June. (Except, whoops, Bill Keller just did, as I was writing this! He reads Romenesko, obv.)
One (NYDN editor Kevin Convey) has an active, currently updated Twitter account.

for the whole article, see Gawker#mce_temp_url#

Most Major Newspaper Editors Don’t Even Use Twitter

Thanks to Jim Romenesko, who went and looked at the the ten editors of America’s ten largest newspapers, and what they’re doing on the Twitter.

  • Four of the ten appear to have no Twitter account whatsoever.
  • Three others have accounts that are secret or inactive.
  • Two others have not tweeted since June. (Except, whoops, Bill Keller just did, as I was writing this! He reads Romenesko, obv.)
  • One (NYDN editor Kevin Convey) has an active, currently updated Twitter account.

for the whole article, see Gawker#mce_temp_url#

Let me tell you a thing or two about editors. Most that I’ve known have mistakenly thought they, and not the writers, deserved the credit for all the good pieces that run in their publication and none of the blame for the bad ones. (I think this held true for me, too, when I was an editor!) Try complimenting an editor sometime about a good piece in his publication, and you’re certain to get this eye-rolling response: “You shoulda seen it when it came in!” For this reason alone, editors should be sentenced to perpetual anonymity

…Not to go all Ed Anger on you, but editor credits make my bowels seize the same way the “letters from the editor” in some magazines do. Graydon Carter! Shut up and let me read my Vanity Fair in peace! I don’t want to know more about the writer of the story, how the story came together, and how wonderful it is. Just let me intuit all of that from reading the story itself.
You cannot produce great journalism unless editors are running the show.

— Arianna Huffinton, in response to to a question at the paidContent 2011 conference in New York, about how she will manage and direct HuffPo and AOL’s other publications.

Adventures in Freelancing

In which our hero must find women who trade their children for luxury Hermes hand bags.

Writer: “Three years ago I would have gotten $4,000 for a story that took this much work.”

Editor: “That was the old media.”