Posts tagged with ‘errors’

Ireland’s Central Bank Issues Commemorative Coin to Celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses, Misquotes the Text
The bank inserted an extra word (“that”) into a sentence taken from Ulysses. Not the biggest error, but still.
"While the error is regretted," the bank said in a statement, "it should be noted that the coin is an artistic representation of the author and text and not intended as a literal representation."
Meantime, some Joyce scholars think its fun. Via the Guardian:

Mark Traynor, manager of the James Joyce Centre, which is dedicated to promoting the author’s life and work, called the slip-up “unfortunate”, but said there was “certainly a humorous side to it too (no ‘flip side of the coin’ pun intended)”.
"For one thing, Joyce was an author who embraced errors. As Stephen remarks in Ulysses, ‘A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery’," said Traynor. "So if there is any value in the little mistake by the minters it is that it has bred a new, unexpected narrative. What should have been a fairly mundane launch of a commemorative coin has suddenly reached a much wider audience than expected."
It also just goes to show, Traynor added, “that – even after the cessation of copyright on Joyce’s major works – you still can’t reproduce a couple of sentences without causing a bit of scandal”.

Image: Front and back of the Ulysses commemorative coin.

Ireland’s Central Bank Issues Commemorative Coin to Celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses, Misquotes the Text

The bank inserted an extra word (“that”) into a sentence taken from Ulysses. Not the biggest error, but still.

"While the error is regretted," the bank said in a statement, "it should be noted that the coin is an artistic representation of the author and text and not intended as a literal representation."

Meantime, some Joyce scholars think its fun. Via the Guardian:

Mark Traynor, manager of the James Joyce Centre, which is dedicated to promoting the author’s life and work, called the slip-up “unfortunate”, but said there was “certainly a humorous side to it too (no ‘flip side of the coin’ pun intended)”.

"For one thing, Joyce was an author who embraced errors. As Stephen remarks in Ulysses, ‘A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery’," said Traynor. "So if there is any value in the little mistake by the minters it is that it has bred a new, unexpected narrative. What should have been a fairly mundane launch of a commemorative coin has suddenly reached a much wider audience than expected."

It also just goes to show, Traynor added, “that – even after the cessation of copyright on Joyce’s major works – you still can’t reproduce a couple of sentences without causing a bit of scandal”.

Image: Front and back of the Ulysses commemorative coin.

This Photo Isn't Real →

This morning we posted a photo from the RNC that shows a “We Built This” sign underneath the national debt clock. 

Good ironic humor that. Unfortunately, as BuzzFeed points out, the photo is a fake. 

We’ve updated the original post to indicate the error. 

With 2,400 notes attached to it and counting, we’re confronted with the social media conundrum of how to reel it back in.

Craig Silverman’s one of the best thinkers around in this regard and recently wrote up some ideas at Poynter:

We will always make mistakes. The process of gathering, packaging, editing and publishing/broadcasting news is rife with opportunities for things to go wrong. Every part of the process has potential points of failure.

Preventing mistakes is of huge importance, but so too is setting the stage to correct them quickly and fully by taking advantage of the networked news environment. Doing so not only meets our obligations to the public, but can in fact build trust and help us feel better about our work as journalists. Bottom line: corrections are important.

Read through for his advice on what to do when the errors get you.

By Suspect in Custody
Via @jfdulac.

By Suspect in Custody

Via @jfdulac.

This American Error →

In January, This American Life broadcast an episode that explored labor practices at Foxconn, the world’s largest electronic component maker.

Turns out, there was a lot there that wasn’t true.

Via Public Radio International:

This American Life and American Public Media’s Marketplace will reveal that a story first broadcast in January on This American Life contained numerous fabrications.

This American Life will devote its entire program this weekend to detailing the errors in the story, which was an excerpt of Mike Daisey’s critically acclaimed one-man show, “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.” In it, Daisey tells how he visited a factory owned by Foxconn that manufactures iPhones and iPads in Shenzhen China. He has performed the monologue in theaters around the country; it’s currently at the Public Theater in New York. Tonight’s This American Life program will include a segment from Marketplace’s Rob Schmitz, and interviews with Daisey himself. Marketplace will feature a shorter version of Schmitz’s report earlier in the evening…

…Some of the falsehoods found in Daisey’s monologue are small ones: the number of factories Daisey visited in China, for instance, and the number of workers he spoke with. Others are large. In his monologue he claims to have met a group of workers who were poisoned on an iPhone assembly line by a chemical called n-hexane. Apple’s audits of its suppliers show that an incident like this occurred in a factory in China, but the factory wasn’t located in Shenzhen, where Daisey visited…

…In Schmitz’s report, he confronts Daisey and Daisey admits to fabricating these characters. “I’m not going to say that I didn’t take a few shortcuts in my passion to be heard,” Daisey tells Schmitz and Glass. “My mistake, the mistake I truly regret, is that I had it on your show as journalism, and it’s not journalism. It’s theater.”

We wrote about Foxconn at the time and have updated the post to reflect this retraction.

Sometimes a Crease Creates a Headline Wrinkle
And sometimes print can get you in trouble. From the Detroit Free Press: United Auto Workers Talks Shit to Ford.
If only it were so. A crease in the paper obscured an ever important “F” in the headline.
Via Poynter/Romenesko.

Sometimes a Crease Creates a Headline Wrinkle

And sometimes print can get you in trouble. From the Detroit Free Press: United Auto Workers Talks Shit to Ford.

If only it were so. A crease in the paper obscured an ever important “F” in the headline.

Via Poynter/Romenesko.

Felix: There’s been a lot of shamefacedness and embarrassment on Twitter from... →

@poynterinstitute: Agreed if you include his statement that the organizations themselves (eg., @WSJ, @Reuters, etc) need be held to a higher standard. Doesn’t wash if @NYTimes posts errors and comes back saying, Don’t mind that, it’s idle water cooler gossip. — Michael

poynterinstitute:

Agree?

felixsalmon:

There’s been a lot of shamefacedness and embarrassment on Twitter from people who tweeted the false news that Piers Morgan had been suspended from CNN. … That said, one of the things I like about Twitter is that it behaves in many ways a lot more like a newsroom than a newspaper. Rumors happen there, and then they get shot down — no harm no foul.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter
That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.
Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.
The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:
Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.
If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter

That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.

Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.

The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:

  1. Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
  2. Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
  3. Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
  4. Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.

If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.

You say Osama, I say Obama. We cool?

Craig Silverman walks us through a week of verbal gaffes:

Yes, U.S. media dominated the mistaken news. To name but a few examples, Geraldo Rivera said on air that, “Obama is dead, I don’t care … what am I saying?”, NPR’s website declared, “Obama Bin Laden Is Dead, Officials Say”, and the website for ABC World News with Diane Sawyer reported that, “Sources Tell ABC News’ Jon Karl That Obama Will Be Buried At Sea.”

Is it really so hard?

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).
Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.
What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.
Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.
Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 
"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."
And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).

Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.

What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.

Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.

Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 

"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."

And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.