posts about or somewhat related to ‘espn’

The story, even if it is a good story, is not the most important thing.

Maria Headley in Sinatra’s Cold is Contagious.

Headley writes in reaction to Caleb Hannan’s Grantland story, Dr. V’s Magical Putter, which has become something of a case study in journalism ethics since it was published on January 15. 

On the Media recaps here:

Last week, ESPN’s  Grantland ran a remarkable story titled “Dr. V’s Magical Putter,” a journalistic odyssey that began with curiosity about a supposedly revolutionary golf club, and ended by focusing on the chaotic life of its inventor, a woman named Essay Anne Vanderbilt. The reporter, Caleb Hannan, discovered that Vanderbilt was transgender, and he revealed his knowledge of this fact to Vanderbilt. Shortly after, Vanderbilt committed suicide.

The piece subsequently made its rounds on the web, sparking outrage and raising a discussion on transgender rights in media, and the ethics of outing.

Vice takes us through Hannan’s reporting process and what he ultimately decided to publish:

He tells us “everything he knows,” which is definitely not the same thing as “everything that’s relevant.” He refers to Dr V as “he” and publishes her old name. He discusses her life before she transitioned to female. He tells us she was married. And that she’d tried to kill herself once before, a few years previously. Never mind that she was clearly vulnerable, it was all just another fantastic twist in the plot for Caleb. “What began as a story about a brilliant woman with a new invention had turned into the tale of a troubled man who had invented a new life for himself.” And never mind that faking her scientific credentials had nothing to do with being transgender. Caleb, who has been found guilty of sloppy journalism before, was simply recycling a media narrative that casts trans people as liars and fakes. 

Grantland’s Editor-in-Chief Bill Simmons has since publicly apologized for the story, taking the blame for his writer’s mistakes and lamenting that he failed Hannan as an editor. Simmons admitted that the Grantland staff was not sensitive enough with the story and uninformed on transgender people’s rights, high suicide rates among trans* people, and even correct pronoun usage. 

FJP: As Headley points out, there are a few things that should come before the all-important story for a journalist. Right after “Seek the truth and report it” on SPJ’s Code of Ethics comes “Minimize harm — Ethical journalists treat sources, subjects and colleagues as human beings deserving of respect.” 

Nate Silver Talks Plans for Moving FiveThirtyEight to ESPN

Nate Silver, the stats-driven political forecasting superstar, has left the New York Times to set up shop with ESPN. In this video, he and Grantland’s Bill Simmons discuss what goes into starting a new publication, from people hired, to creating an editorial voice to eventually standing on your own two feet.

Celebrating Bodies

For the last four years, ESPN the Magazine has celebrated the human form by shooting athletes from mainstream and alternative sports in the buff. They call it the Body Issue.

Here are a few of the athletes that caught our gaze (from top to bottom):

Courtney Force, NHRA funny car driver. 2012 Rookie of the Year.
"When we launch off the starting line, it’s about 3 to 4 g’s, and you’re pulling those g’s all the way to the end until you hit 300 mph. It’s like being strapped to a rocket."

Sydney Leroux, Forward, US national soccer team.
I like that I have a lot of scars. I like that I feel tough. It reminds me of how hard I like to play.

Tara Geiger, motorcross racer. Six-time X Games medalist.
"People assume I’m this gnarly, badass tough chick who wants to beat people up or show the guys that I’m stronger than they are, but that’s not the case. My arms are just like that because they’re a byproduct of my sport. I’m a lover, not a fighter. But yeah, I could probably beat them up if I wanted to."

Images: Via ESPN. Select to embiggen.

Athletes Recreating Iconic Album Covers

As ESPN The Magazine’s music issue hits the stands they’ve recreated old album covers with current day athletes.

Here we have:

Click through for slideshows of each photo shoot. Select to embiggen.

Oksana Masters
ESPN the Magazine’s annual celebration of the athletic form hits the stands this week with six different covers (Rob Gronkowski, Jose Bautista, Tyson Chandler, Daniela Hantuchova, Candace Parker and Ronda Rousey).
Says Deputy Editor Neely Lohmann about pulling the issue together:

I can’t begin to imagine how many images we shot for this issue — thousands, certainly. And whittling down those images to our favorites is both tremendously fun and incredibly difficult. But the photographers do the first edit; they send us the ones they are most happy with. From that group, I work closely with the photo editors, Karen Frank and Nancy Weisman, creative director, John Korpics, and Editor-in-Chief, Chad Millman, to select the ones we feel best represent the athlete. But even then, we have some tough calls. That’s why we include exclusive extras in our online photo gallery.

And that gallery would be here.
Image: Oksana Masters, Paralympic rower from the Ukraine. ESPN the Magazine: Bodies We Want 2012.

Oksana Masters

ESPN the Magazine’s annual celebration of the athletic form hits the stands this week with six different covers (Rob Gronkowski, Jose Bautista, Tyson Chandler, Daniela Hantuchova, Candace Parker and Ronda Rousey).

Says Deputy Editor Neely Lohmann about pulling the issue together:

I can’t begin to imagine how many images we shot for this issue — thousands, certainly. And whittling down those images to our favorites is both tremendously fun and incredibly difficult. But the photographers do the first edit; they send us the ones they are most happy with. From that group, I work closely with the photo editors, Karen Frank and Nancy Weisman, creative director, John Korpics, and Editor-in-Chief, Chad Millman, to select the ones we feel best represent the athlete. But even then, we have some tough calls. That’s why we include exclusive extras in our online photo gallery.

And that gallery would be here.

Image: Oksana Masters, Paralympic rower from the Ukraine. ESPN the Magazine: Bodies We Want 2012.

We’d wonder what they were thinking but that would assume they were thinking.
Via ESPN:

Last night, ESPN.com’s mobile web site posted an offensive headline referencing Jeremy Lin at 2:30 am ET. The headline was removed at 3:05 am ET. We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.

We’d wonder what they were thinking but that would assume they were thinking.

Via ESPN:

Last night, ESPN.com’s mobile web site posted an offensive headline referencing Jeremy Lin at 2:30 am ET. The headline was removed at 3:05 am ET. We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.

Visualizing Football Player Media Coverage
Player height is scaled to number of mentions he received on ESPN’s Sportscenter or Sunday NFL Countdown during the 2011 season.
Via the New York Times.
Click to embiggen.

Visualizing Football Player Media Coverage

Player height is scaled to number of mentions he received on ESPN’s Sportscenter or Sunday NFL Countdown during the 2011 season.

Via the New York Times.

Click to embiggen.

What’s taking preference now is to try to get as ubiquitous as possible. Program and design from the mobile standpoint first, then extrapolate what could be applied for the PC, television and print experience.

Michael Bayle, VP and general manager of ESPN Mobile. ESPN Deems Mobile First Screen.

In a keynote at MediaPost’s Mobile Insider Summit, Bayle said that users spent 45% more time with ESPN mobile content in 2011 than 2010, with 150,000 people using the networks mobile products at any one time.

Via MediaPost:

One of Bayle’s initiatives since joining ESPN last fall has been to reduce its focus to a handful of apps from the scores of titles released in recent years. That means the strongest focus on apps would be dedicated to Sports Center, collegiate sports, sports fantasy leagues, ESPN the Magazine and international sports like soccer and cricket.

He noted that apps overall still account for the vast majority of the company’s mobile usage, although the embrace of HTML5 programming should swing the balance back in favor of the mobile Web in the coming years.

ESPN’s mobile strategy is seen in terms of “bridges,” connecting people to its broader digital offerings, TV and mobile commerce. Mobile is the gateway to other screens and media formats. It also embraces social properties, like Twitter and Facebook, to distribute content more widely and allow fans to connect around live sporting events and hometown teams.

When it comes to TV, part of the goal is to capitalize on two-screen viewing and the gradual shift toward interactive television. As an example, Bayle pointed to a new partnership the network unveiled today with Shazam that allows Winter X Games viewers on ESPN to use the Shazam smartphone app to access video highlights, photos and even music from the event.