Posts tagged with ‘exhibits’

Whitney Curtis -- Gateway Mercy Ministries orphanage in the Natete community of Kampala, Uganda. GMM provides services to 72 boys and girls in the slums of Uganda's capitol city. Dmitry Markov -- Rostok, a Russian organization that manages a boarding school and social adaptation program for adolescent boys with disabilities who are learning how to live independently. Rachael Jane -- True Light Family Resource Center, a US organization that gives shelter, social services, and food to homeless families in need. Jonathan Torgovnik -- Foundation Rwanda. Established in 2008 to support the mothers and children surviving the trauma of the 1994 genocide. Adam Nadel --The Malaria Consortium, an international non-profit organization with the aim of improving disease control at global, regional and local levels. Gyula Sopronyi -- Foundation for the Future of the Carpathian Basin supports childcare institutions and schools for children in need. Katie Orlinsky -- Caritas provides medical relief with a mobile clinic to areas that lack basic medical services. Orlinsky took this photograph at the Beach Refugee Camp in Gaza. Dmitry Markov -- Rostok, a Russian organization that manages a boarding school and social adaptation program for adolescent boys with disabilities who are learning how to live independently. Zoriah Miller -- Raising Up Hope for Uganda, a small organization run by a young man who made it out of the slums of Kampala and decided he wanted to help other orphans to find better lives. Mary Calvert -- A Congolese National Army soldier, who is not accused of rape, listens to sensitivity training sponsored by Women For Women International.

picturedept:

Right Before Your Eyes: Photography Driven By Social Change

Right Before Your Eyes honors the work of photographers who bring attention to the most pressing public policy, human rights, and environmental concerns, through collaboration with existing nonprofit organizations. Presented by PhotoPhilanthropy, an organization that promotes social change and charitable work by connecting photographers with nonprofits, the visual stories expressed by these mutually inspiring partnerships have the potential to influence policy around the world.

The exhibition is free, hosted in the Visitors Lobby of the United Nations building, and open to the public August 16 – September 10. For detailed information about visiting requirements and hours, visit the “Exhibit” page on the United Nations website.

FJP: And… added to this month’s field trips.

Photographs from Fukushima
Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.
If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.
In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.

Photographs from Fukushima

Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.

If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.

In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.