Posts tagged exhibits

picturedept:

Right Before Your Eyes: Photography Driven By Social Change

Right Before Your Eyes honors the work of photographers who bring attention to the most pressing public policy, human rights, and environmental concerns, through collaboration with existing nonprofit organizations. Presented by PhotoPhilanthropy, an organization that promotes social change and charitable work by connecting photographers with nonprofits, the visual stories expressed by these mutually inspiring partnerships have the potential to influence policy around the world.

The exhibition is free, hosted in the Visitors Lobby of the United Nations building, and open to the public August 16 – September 10. For detailed information about visiting requirements and hours, visit the “Exhibit” page on the United Nations website.

FJP: And… added to this month’s field trips.

Photographs from Fukushima
Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.
If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.
In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.

Photographs from Fukushima

Last week we wrote about Japan’s Memory Salvage Project, a beautiful volunteer initiative that seeks to restore some of the 750,000 found photographs collected in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami.

If you’re in New York next month, Aperture is exhibiting some of the images as part of a show that started in Japan and then moved to Los Angeles.

In an interview with the New Yorker, project lead Munemasa Takahashi explains:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs. Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

The photographs will be on display at the Aperture Foundation from April 2 through April 27.