Posts tagged with ‘feminism’

#NotYourNarrative

Related: The danger of a single story, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, via TED.

Lulu App Allows Women to Rate Guys They’ve Dated

The Lulu app is a private app for females to review men based on their personal experiences with them. Women sync the app with their Facebook profiles, Lulu locates all their friends who are male, and the app shows the male friends’ ratings and reviews.

The app is only for women — meaning you can’t log in unless you’re listed as a female on Facebook. Women can’t leave personalized reviews, but they can review men based on hashtags provided by the app, which include everything from #GreatHair and #Big.Feet to #TotalF**kingDickhead.

Lulu’s founder, Alexandra Chong, says, “I created the app because my girlfriends and I needed it” — for “girl-talk” apparently. You know, the kind of girl-talk that lets you publicly shame a guy for his past mistakes if you so choose.

FJP: Ladies, we don’t like it when men treat us like numbered pieces of meat that can be defined by a few basic categories. By imitating the habits of chauvinist pigs, we’re doing nothing for feminism and we’re giving guys the right to turn around and rag on us all they want. Don’t be a #TotalF**ckingDickhead. Lead by example, and say no to Lulu. — Krissy

P.S. There’s a Lulu Dude app that allows guys to see their ratings and reviews. But according to this fella, it’s not user-friendly. 

The site is transparently fake and designed to embarrass anyone vain or careless enough to “Invite 25 friends to INSTANTLY reveal” their Lulu score. Given that these scores are for ladies’ eyes only, with plenty of security to that effect, skepticism should prevail here. 

If you bring up the site online, it teases that “2 Girls have favorited you” and “3 Girls have checked you out”—even before you tell it who you are. It also asks to use your location and begins to send you faintly mocking emails (“Hey, handsome,” “Congrats, big man!”) that  encourage the recipient to click on dubious blind links.

#SoLame.

Video: Lulu

Tween Girls Ask The Internet If They’re Pretty or Ugly

Am I Pretty or Ugly” is a social media phenomenon where tween girls post YouTube videos of themselves and ask viewers to tell them if they’re pretty or ugly. All of the videos have more or less the same “script;” the girls will say that some people tell them they’re pretty, and some people tell them they’re ugly, but they just want to know “the truth.” They then request that people leave a comment with their opinion on whether or not they’re attractive.

A global study conducted for Dove’s Real Beauty Campaign revealed that 90 percent of 15-to 17-year-old girls are dissatisfied with their physical appearance. 13 percent of them admit to having an eating disorder and nearly a quarter of them would consider plastic surgery.

So the fact that adolescent girls don’t like their bodies and they’re straight up asking the Internet whether or not they’re attractive is unfortunate — but not shocking. 

In 1997, adolescent girls identified the mass media as their primary source for health and body image information — and that was before the Internet really took off.

Now in 2013, social media is becoming the preferred source of body image information for young girls, and they’re trusting Internet users to give them “the truth” about their appearance. This so-called “truth” is hurting them — with 68 percent of girls saying they’ve had negative experiences on social networking sites and 53 percent of them becoming unhappy with their bodies by age 13

Tumblr blogs like “Fuck Yeah Thigh Gap” and  “Bikini Bridge” urge women to look bony and frighteningly thin in order to be hot. And we can’t forget Thinspiration — where girls encourage each other to be anorexic or bulimic for the sake of “attractiveness.” 

FJP: The ironic thing about girls turning to social media to determine whether or not they’re attractive is that most adolescent girls present false images of themselves on the Internet.

Seventy-four percent of girls agree that most girls their age use social media sites to make themselves look “cooler” than they are in real life, and forty-one percent of them admit that this describes them, according to a 2010 study by Girl Scouts. 

If you take away the Instagram filters, Photoshop, creative camera angles, and the sweet Tumblr layouts, what do you have left? Normal tween girls with zits and cellulite, most likely. 

If these girls are looking at Photoshopped images of one another all day long, their ideas of what’s physically achievable is going to be tragically skewed. Actresses and models still seem larger than life to a lot of young girls. But when tweens see their own friends looking impossibly good in their photos, the pressure to be pretty is far more intense. The “Am I Pretty or Ugly” YouTube videos are a clear indicator that the body image pressure levels for tween girls are officially in the danger zone. — Krissy

Satirical Video Mocks India’s Rape Culture 

The comedy group All India Bakchod satirizes India’s habit of victim blaming and mistreating women in the video, “It’s Your Fault.” The actresses in the skit say that wearing skirts and dresses, working late at night, and cooking Chow Mein for men makes women responsible for being raped.

The sad part about all this? All of these “joke instances” have actually been used in real world situations to victim-blame women.

Funny in a sad way, eh? 

humanrightswatch:

The Price of Sex (Trailer):

The Price of Sex is a feature-length documentary about young Eastern European women who’ve been drawn into a netherworld of sex trafficking and abuse. Intimate, harrowing and revealing, it is a story told by the young women who were supposed to be silenced by shame, fear and violence. Photojournalist Mimi Chakarova, who grew up in Bulgaria, takes us on a personal investigative journey, exposing the shadowy world of sex trafficking from Eastern Europe to the Middle East and Western Europe. Filming undercover and gaining extraordinary access, Chakarova illuminates how even though some women escape to tell their stories, sex trafficking thrives. Learn more at www.priceofsex.org .

FJP: The Price of Sex was written, directed and produced by Mimi Chakarova, won the 2011 Nestor Almendros Award for Courage in Filmmaking at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival, and the 2011 Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting.

If you’re in DC there’s a screening of the film this evening.

Forty years ago, a group of feminists, led by Gloria Steinem, did the unthinkable: They started a magazine for women, published by women — and the first issue sold out in eight days. — New York Magazine.

In the years leading up to the birth of Ms., women had trouble getting a credit card without a man’s signature, had few legal rights when it came to divorce or reproduction, and were expected to aspire solely to marriage and motherhood. Job listings were segregated (“Help wanted, male”). There was no Title IX (banning sex discrimination in federally funded athletic programs); no battered-women’s shelters, rape-crisis centers, and no terms such as sexual harassment and domestic violence.
Few women ran magazines, even when the readership was entirely female, and they weren’t permitted to write the stories they felt were important; the focus had to be on fashion, recipes, cosmetics, or how to lure a man and keep him interested.  “When I suggested political stories to The New York Times Sunday Magazine, my editor just said something like, ‘I don’t think of you that way,’ ” recalls Gloria Steinem. “It was all pale male faces in, on, and running media,” says Robin Morgan, who was Ms.’s editor in the late eighties and early nineties.
But in the mid-sixties, feminist organizations such as New York Radical Women,Redstockings, and NOW began to emerge. On March 18, 1970, about a hundred women stormed into the male editor’s office of Ladies’ Home Journal and staged a sit-in for eleven hours, demanding that the magazine hire a female editor-in-chief. Says feminist activist-writer Vivian Gornick, “It was a watershed moment. It showed us, the activists in the women’s movement, that we did, indeed, have a movement.”

Image: Ms. staff meeting in June 1972. From left: Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Gloria Steinem, Margaret Sloan-Hunter, Suzanne Levine, Mary Thom, Harriet Lyons, Patricia Carbine, and Ruth Sullivan. Photo by Nancy Crampton.

Forty years ago, a group of feminists, led by Gloria Steinem, did the unthinkable: They started a magazine for women, published by women — and the first issue sold out in eight days. — New York Magazine.

In the years leading up to the birth of Ms., women had trouble getting a credit card without a man’s signature, had few legal rights when it came to divorce or reproduction, and were expected to aspire solely to marriage and motherhood. Job listings were segregated (“Help wanted, male”). There was no Title IX (banning sex discrimination in federally funded athletic programs); no battered-women’s shelters, rape-crisis centers, and no terms such as sexual harassment and domestic violence.

Few women ran magazines, even when the readership was entirely female, and they weren’t permitted to write the stories they felt were important; the focus had to be on fashion, recipes, cosmetics, or how to lure a man and keep him interested. “When I suggested political stories to The New York Times Sunday Magazine, my editor just said something like, ‘I don’t think of you that way,’ ” recalls Gloria Steinem. “It was all pale male faces in, on, and running media,” says Robin Morgan, who was Ms.’s editor in the late eighties and early nineties.

But in the mid-sixties, feminist organizations such as New York Radical Women,Redstockings, and NOW began to emerge. On March 18, 1970, about a hundred women stormed into the male editor’s office of Ladies’ Home Journal and staged a sit-in for eleven hours, demanding that the magazine hire a female editor-in-chief. Says feminist activist-writer Vivian Gornick, “It was a watershed moment. It showed us, the activists in the women’s movement, that we did, indeed, have a movement.”

ImageMs. staff meeting in June 1972. From left: Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Gloria Steinem, Margaret Sloan-Hunter, Suzanne Levine, Mary Thom, Harriet Lyons, Patricia Carbine, and Ruth Sullivan. Photo by Nancy Crampton.

curiositycounts:

Visualizing Gender Stereotypes – designer Valentina D’Efilippo explores the biased gendered cues children receive through visual communication. Reminiscent of The Pink and Blue Projects.

curiositycounts:

Visualizing Gender Stereotypes – designer Valentina D’Efilippo explores the biased gendered cues children receive through visual communication. Reminiscent of The Pink and Blue Projects.

(via curiositycounts)

While the prominence of women in the revolutions has been moving, there is a psychology behind celebrating and glorifying women’s political activity when it is part of a popular push. In these times women are almost tokenised by men as the ultimate downtrodden victims, the sign that things are desperate, that even members of the fairer sex are leaving their hearths and taking to the streets. The perception isn’t that women are fighting for their own rights, but merely that they are underwriting the revolution by bringing their matronly dignity to the crowd like some mascot.

Web serial Vag Magazine has pretty much nailed the complexities and intrigue of one of New York City’s most coveted industries.

In these hilarious webisodes, third-wave feminists Fennel, Sylvie and Bethany use the proceeds from their Etsy store to start their own magazine Vag, in the offices of Gemma, a fashion magazine “that has fallen, as all patriarchal regimes eventually will,” says Fennel.

The plotlines and characters are uproarious, with staffers like Reba, a legend of gonzo feminist pop culture journalism,  Heavy Flo, a vapid hero of the roller derby circuit, and oh…also Meghan, a holdover from Gemma, and the only one who knows anything about magazines.

Deftly put together by comedians from the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in New York, the Vag Magazine saga is a self-aware but sidesplitting takedown of Brooklyn hipsterism, feminist cliches, and the drama of life at a bi-monthly rag.

(Source: gigaom.com)