posts about or somewhat related to ‘filter bubbles’

Popping the "Filter Bubble" →

When those of a certain generation first hear of the “Filter Bubble,” they might reflect on that brief two weeks in the mid-’90s when the band Filter was kind of popular. These days, the Filter Bubble, according to former MoveOn.org executive director Eli Pariser, is the means by which the Information Superhighway functions more like a private driveway upon which only targeted and personalized information travels at the expense of the broader range of knowledge.

A fascinating read on how the Web we experience is completely different for each person, based on browsing history, and online behavior, as tracked by Google and the many free services upon which we depend. Eli Pariser calls these “filter bubbles.” We live within the bubbles our filters create, and we’ll bet you didn’t know that Google calculates 57 separate variables before delivering search results custom tailored to meet your needs.
Web services now act as the gatekeepers and editors of much our lives. While these communication tools know an incredible amount about us, and can be quite powerful, what is left out is in many ways more important that the things we actually do see.
Pariser says:

The primary purpose of an editor [is] to extend the horizon of what people are interested in and what people know. Giving people what they think they want is easy, but it’s also not very satisfying: the same stuff, over and over again. Great editors are like great matchmakers: they introduce people to whole new ways of thinking, and they fall in love.

A fascinating read on how the Web we experience is completely different for each person, based on browsing history, and online behavior, as tracked by Google and the many free services upon which we depend. Eli Pariser calls these “filter bubbles.” We live within the bubbles our filters create, and we’ll bet you didn’t know that Google calculates 57 separate variables before delivering search results custom tailored to meet your needs.

Web services now act as the gatekeepers and editors of much our lives. While these communication tools know an incredible amount about us, and can be quite powerful, what is left out is in many ways more important that the things we actually do see.

Pariser says:

The primary purpose of an editor [is] to extend the horizon of what people are interested in and what people know. Giving people what they think they want is easy, but it’s also not very satisfying: the same stuff, over and over again. Great editors are like great matchmakers: they introduce people to whole new ways of thinking, and they fall in love.