Posts tagged firefox

Since <Blink> won’t blink in Blink, Firefox would be the only remaining browser that allows text to actually flash using the <Blink> element.

Vijit Assar, The Evolution of the Web, In a Blink, The New Yorker.

FJP: It must have been really fun to write that sentence. The whole piece is worth a read if you want an easy enough 101 on the history of internet browsers and what’s coming next. Which, if you use a web browser, you should. And it’s in The New Yorker, so you can show this to your grandma and maybe she’ll read it too.

Pick a site, any site, and &#8220;share&#8221; buttons are littered all over the place.
Mozilla/Firefox is asking why not bring that basic functionality up to the browser. 
Via Webmonkey:

Mozilla wants to help stop the proliferation of “share this” badges currently cluttering the web. These days nearly every page you visit is plastered with dozens of icons offering to like, or tweet, or +1, or thumbs up, or otherwise tell your friends what you think of the page in question. The clutter can be distracting or even overwhelming and, if Mozilla has anything to say about it, unnecessary.
Firefox has a plan to clean up the clutter and move the sharing power into the browser itself. Mozilla Labs has announced a new project, Firefox Share, a Firefox add-on that makes it easy to share webpages on Twitter or Facebook right from the Firefox URL bar.
Firefox Share is currently an alpha quality release and may have some bugs, but if that doesn’t bother you head on over to the download page and install it (Firefox Share does not require a restart).
Once installed the new add-on adds a paper airplane icon to the URL bar; click that icon and a drop down panel allows you to post to Twitter or Facebook or e-mail a message to a friend.

Of course, there are already a number of plugins, add-ons and extensions for different browsers to accomplish this but offloading this functionality from site to browser as a native function is an interesting idea. 

Pick a site, any site, and “share” buttons are littered all over the place.

Mozilla/Firefox is asking why not bring that basic functionality up to the browser. 

Via Webmonkey:

Mozilla wants to help stop the proliferation of “share this” badges currently cluttering the web. These days nearly every page you visit is plastered with dozens of icons offering to like, or tweet, or +1, or thumbs up, or otherwise tell your friends what you think of the page in question. The clutter can be distracting or even overwhelming and, if Mozilla has anything to say about it, unnecessary.

Firefox has a plan to clean up the clutter and move the sharing power into the browser itself. Mozilla Labs has announced a new project, Firefox Share, a Firefox add-on that makes it easy to share webpages on Twitter or Facebook right from the Firefox URL bar.

Firefox Share is currently an alpha quality release and may have some bugs, but if that doesn’t bother you head on over to the download page and install it (Firefox Share does not require a restart).

Once installed the new add-on adds a paper airplane icon to the URL bar; click that icon and a drop down panel allows you to post to Twitter or Facebook or e-mail a message to a friend.

Of course, there are already a number of plugins, add-ons and extensions for different browsers to accomplish this but offloading this functionality from site to browser as a native function is an interesting idea. 

AP Embraces Mozilla’s ‘Do Not Track’ Header

A new feature in Firefox 4 is support for something called a DNT header. Activate it in your browser preferences and Firefox will tell servers that you do not want to accept any tracking cookies.

This is a big deal for lots of people, both those who have privacy concerns and advertisers who’d like to allay those concerns, plop a cookie on your browser, track you as you go about your business and serve up behavioral ads based on that business.

Publishers like tracking because it helps them know who their visitors are which, in turn, lets them work with marketers and advertisers to deliver high valued, premium ads. 

All of which makes it all the more remarkable that the Associated Press is endorsing DNT headers.

Via Wired:

Mozilla announced today that the AP News Registry has implemented support for the DNT header across 800 news sites, which see more than 175 million unique visitors every month. That’s a huge shot in the arm for Do Not Track, which was previously a great idea, but one with little real-world application.

Starting today, provided you turn on the DNT preference in Firefox 4, the AP News Registry will no longer set any cookies.

What do these have to do with journalism?
Nothing&#8230; absolutely nothing.
'Cept that journalists need shoes too.

What do these have to do with journalism?

Nothing… absolutely nothing.

'Cept that journalists need shoes too.

Google Drops Native H.264 Support

If you’re a video producer, have friends who are video producers, or are just freaky geeky, take note: Google’s dropping native support for the H.264 video codec from the next version of Chrome.

This matters to those who are moving towards HTML5 and clashes with publishers’ existing attempts to deliver video across platforms. Simply, Apple’s dominant mobile platforms (various iThings) only play video encoded as H.264.

As WebMonkey explains:

Google has rather nonchalantly dropped a bombshell on the web — future versions of the Chrome browser will no longer support the popular H.264 video codec. Instead Google is throwing its hat in with Firefox and Opera, choosing to support the open, royalty-free WebM codec.

Google says the move is meant to “enable open innovation” on the web by ensuring that web video remains royalty-free. While H.264 is widely supported and free for consumers, sites encoding videos — like YouTube — must pay licensing fees to the MPEG Licensing Association, which holds patents on AVC/H.264

Prior to Google’s announcement, the web video codec battle was evenly split — Firefox and Opera supported the open Ogg and WebM codecs, while Safari and Internet Explorer supported H.264. Google took the egalitarian path and supported all three codecs.

Google’s move away from H.264 makes sense given that Google is already heavily invested in WebM. In fact, the only reason the WebM codec exists is because Google purchased On2, the creators of the VP8 codec. Once Google acquired the underlying code it turned around and released VP8 as the open source WebM project.

There’s been considerable outcry from developers concerned that they now need to support two video codecs to get HTML5 video working on their sites. However, given that Firefox — which has a significantly greater market share than Google’s Chrome browser — was never planning to support the H.264 codec, developers were always going to need to support both codes for their sites to work across browsers.

Takeaway: if delivering video, make sure you’re encoding it, or using a video service provider that’s encoding it, with both H.264 and WebM.

Update

Ars Technica’s Peter Bright thinks dropping H.264 is a step back, writing:

Google’s justification doesn’t really add up, and there’s a strong chance that the decision will serve only to undermine the use of the <video> tag completely. This is not a move promoting the open web. If anything, it is quite the reverse.